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Place of Execution,A(CD)Lib(Unabr.) Audio CD – Audiobook, CD, Unabridged

4.5 out of 5 stars 77 customer reviews

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Audio CD, Audiobook, CD, Unabridged
CDN$ 121.50
CDN$ 121.50

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
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Product Details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio; Library edition (Sept. 5 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1441840605
  • ISBN-13: 978-1441840608
  • Product Dimensions: 21.3 x 6.4 x 17.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 998 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 77 customer reviews
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Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

This superb novel should make Gold Dagger-nominee McDermid's reputation and bring her new readers in droves. It's December 1963 and teenage girls all over Britain are swooning to the Beatles' "I Want to Hold Your Hand." In the tiny, remote village of Scardale, Derbyshire, 13-year-old Alison Carter is envied by her peers because her stepfather buys her all the latest records. When Alison goes missing one dark night, Dist. Insp. George Bennett takes control of the case, despite being new to the job and the district. Other children have gone missing recently from towns and cities in the north, but somehow Alison's case is different. Although the police feverishly track down clues and organize searches over the moors, any hope that they'll find the girl fades as the days go by. Obsessed by the case, George is tormented by his lack of success and by the suffering of Alison's mother. Little more can be said without giving away key plot points, but McDermid spins a haunting tale whose complexity never masks her adroitness at creating memorable characters and scenes. Her narrative spell is such that the reader is immersed immediately in the rural Britain of the early '60s. She clearly did extensive research on how police work was done at the time, and it has paid off beautifully. The format of the novel is unusual, with much of it purporting to be a true crime book, but McDermid keeps the suspense taut, and her pacing never flags. This is an extraordinary achievement, and it's sure to be on many lists of the best mysteries of the year. 10-city author tour. (Sept. 20)
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Booklist

Readers will be reminded of the real-life Moors Murders and of Stephen King's fictive eerie-village tales as they make their way through this compelling, funhouse-mirror mystery. McDermid turns the English village cozy on its head as she presents Scardale, a village whose hard-bitten inhabitants try to keep the world out and their secrets in. Part of the mystery is set in the '60s, when several children disappeared and were later found murdered in nearby Manchester. The stepdaughter of Scardale's leading citizen goes missing next. The local police investigating the disappearance are met with byzantine resistance from the villagers at every turn. The mystery deepens throughout, even extending, with a shocking ending, 30 years into the future. McDermid, who won the British Gold Dagger Award in 1995 for Mermaid Singing, brings some cunning new twists to the psychological-suspense genre. Connie Fletcher
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By lawyeraau TOP 500 REVIEWER on Nov. 11 2008
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This Edgar Award finalist and New York Times Notable Book of the Year is a beautifully crafted, intriguing mystery, with well-fleshed characters and an intricate plot. Quintessentially English to its core, this mystery will captivate the reader, not only with its plot but with the vivid imagery that the author skillfully conjures for the reader. Filled with a myriad of twists and turns, this book will keep the reader riveted to its pages.

In the winter of 1983, a thirteen year old girl, Alison Carter, out for a walk with her dog, suddenly vanishes from her sleepy, insular English hamlet. Although there is no corpse, an unexpected discovery in a local cave brings George Bennett, the young Inspector assigned to the case, to an inevitable conclusion, leading to an arrest. Despite its resolution, this case will continue to haunt Inspector Bennett for decades to come.

When journalist Catherine Heathcote decides to write a book about the Derbyshire murder case, the now retired George Bennett fully cooperates until the eve of publication, when he suddenly requests that the book not be published for reasons that he refuses to share with Ms. Heathcote. Suddenly, the intrepid journalist senses that there is more to this story than meets the eye, and she sets out to unravel the secret of what really happened to Alison Carter in the winter of 1963. It is a journey of discovery that will fascinate the reader.

Those who enjoy beautifully written, well-plotted mysteries will simply love this highly atmospheric book. The author is clearly a superlative writer, with real talent for writing intricately plotted mysteries, while creating memorable characters. Bravo!
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By A Customer on Jan. 13 2001
Format: Hardcover
Don't believe the hype. I purchased this book based on all the glowing reviews. I expected something unique and original -- the literary equivalent to the suprise at the end of "The Sixth Sense."
I came away bitterly disappointed. No more than 50 pages into the book, I had a theory about "whodunnit" that seemed so obvious, I thought my theory couldn't possibly be the widely-hyped plot twist. After racing through the book to find out what the "real" surprise was going to be, it turned out that my theory was right on target. So much for the unguessable surprise ending!
I also had a problem with the denouement because it seemed so implausible. I won't spoil the ending for others, but there is no way that these events could occur in real life. The complete lack of nexus between the plot and plausibility made the book seem downright silly.
I suppose if my expectations had not been so high, I would have enjoyed this book more. The format is unusual; the writing is adequate; and the book is not unreadable. But if you purchase this book thinking that you will be getting something truly out of the ordinary, you will be sorely disappointed.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Now, I'm not tooting my own horn, nor do I think I was particularly clever...but the "shocking ending" was, to me, obvious by about halfway through the book. I found a previous reviewer's comments interesting - the reviewer stated that upon rereading the book, he/she was able to pick up on many little things previously missed...my problem was the "little things" seemed glaringly to point to the ending upon initial read! Maybe I've read too many similar books to be fooled, but it was a disappointment to me.
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Format: Kindle Edition
When a thirteen-year-old girl goes missing from a small village in the middle of nowhere George Bennett takes notice. He immediately suspects foul play and with the freezing temperatures puts a team together to find the child. When people in the village clam up it takes a persistent man to make them trust him enough to release what little they know. Slowly he puts a case together but without a body, he’s on shaky ground.
I usually enjoy a detective book but this one didn‘t grip me as I hoped it would. I felt that the characters were not engaging enough, but I did persevere. I was disturbed by the continual description of smoking habits, was it necessary? I really felt that the entire line-up of character’s obsessive chain-smoking was getting in the way of the story, so much so that I actually wondered if it was done for the purpose of word filling.
I appreciated the remote setting’s authentic feel and the parochial villagers. The story was good if a little long and drawn out.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Remember when the food and drink naming trend began? The trend of reaching for increased verisimilitude in novels by describing the exact nature of the nourishment consumed by the characters? The protagonist didn�t just discuss something over an undefined dinner. He or she spoke while ingesting sweetbreads smothered in a delicate sauce of�well you get the picture. In �A Place of Execution� we are informed every time that a character smokes a cigarette. Not only are we enlighted about the lighting up ceremony, but we are also told the brand of the cigarette, and kept abreast of events by updates on ash flicking, inhaling and stub extinguishing. Not that this makes for an unworthy novel; its just odd that Ms McDermid has decided to spend so much time on this particular vice. My hunch is that the author had just given up smoking when writing the novel, and that she is smoking vicariously through her characters.
The novel concerns a young girl who has disappeared from her home in a tiny, secluded town in England. Police Inspector George Barnett is in charge of the case and a dedicated man he is. He devotes most of his time in trying to find young Alison, and we readers share the effort being dragged through hill and dale in the search. The townspeople, being very secluded, would be good candidates for biological research in the investigation of the genetic effects of inbreeding. They are horrified about Alison�s disappearance, yet are strangely uncooperative with the police. Yet the diligence of George�s intensive search while smoking pack after pack of cigarettes pays off. Someone is arrested for the crime, and is convicted of murder. Then we jump 30 years and find new information about the disappearance that is quite disconcerting.
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