Le Poeme De L Extase/Pno ... has been added to your Cart

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Le Poeme De L Extase/Pno Cto/P Import

5.0 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

Price: CDN$ 35.39 & FREE Shipping. Details
Only 1 left in stock - order soon.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
26 new from CDN$ 14.70 3 used from CDN$ 22.55


Product Details

  • Audio CD (May 25 1999)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Deutsche Grammophon
  • ASIN: B00000JLEP
  • In-Print Editions: Audio CD
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews
  •  Would you like to update product info, give feedback on images, or tell us about a lower price?


1. Le Poème de l'extase, op. 54
2. Concerto for Piano & Orchestra in F Sharp Minor, op 20: I - Allegro
3. Concerto for Piano & Orchestra in F Sharp Minor, op 20: II - Andante
4. Concerto for Piano & Orchestra in F Sharp Minor, op 20: III - Allegro moderato
5. Promethee, Le Poème du Feu, op. 60

Product Description

Amazon.ca

If you want to hear music suited to the millennial frenzy, a prime place to start is with Russian maverick composer Alexander Scriabin. In the final years of his unfortunately brief life, he dreamed up transcendent musical projects that make Wagner seem like parlor entertainment. Among the relatively few orchestral works Scriabin did complete are some stunners that blaze a uniquely visionary, idiosyncratic path beyond the impasse of ripe fin-de-siècle romanticism. The three starkly contrasting pieces gathered here offer a splendid entrée into his music. Henry Miller once described the Poem of Ecstasy as "a bath of cocaine, ice, and rainbows." Boulez conjures oceanic heavings and flickering, perfumed washes of color from his players, leading to a mighty orgasm of sound. The composer was also a dynamic virtuoso pianist (a classmate of Rachmaninoff's), and his early concerto shows its debt to Chopin while pursuing an original and tightly integrated blend of soloist and orchestra. Pianist Anatol Ugorski's unflapping conviction reveals the piece for the gem it is--the slow movement's melody is particularly indelible--leaving you wondering why this concerto is programmed so rarely. The piano also adds an important color in Scriabin's 1910 symphonic poem Prometheus, where he ventures even beyond the Poem of Ecstasy into progressive musical territory. From this amalgam of occult mysticism and pioneering harmony, Boulez fashions a majestically textured, multidimensional account that sounds opulent but unclotted. If this whets your appetite for a truly unique composer, try the Scriabin twofer on Chandos that includes his bizarrely brilliant Divine Poem Symphony. --Thomas May

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
In the absence of the availability of the Ashkenazy recording of these same works on the London CD label (I am a "library listener" right now!), I finally had a chance to listen to and study these orchestral works by Alexander Scriabin. I found myself feeling impressed.
Many critics and detractors constantly point out the overly analytical aspect of Pierre Boulez's musical interpretations, a fact he himself admitted to. However, I think that his thoughtfulness, knowledge of orchestral sonorities, attention to detail and architecture, and striving for perfection make for crisp, warm, and full-bodied interpretations.
The "Poem of Ecstasy" is performed with clarity, attention to detail, and an air of mystery. Boulez's French background give this piece an overall sound and feeling that recalls his recording of "Daphnis et Chloe," by Maurice Ravel. The trumpet plays with excellent tone and clarity. The strings seem to balance well with the rest of the orchestra. Perhaps there is too much of a feeling of Ravel and Debussy in this piece, but I find the interpretation very convincing. The final orchestral climax is most impressive, indeed!
Next, I found myself enjoying the collaboration of Anatol Ugorski and Boulez in the Piano Concerto in F-sharp minor and the "Poem of Fire." Ugorski plays with beauty, sensitivity, and crystalline clarity. He is an accomplished virtuoso pianist. Ugorski's playing shows the strong connection with Scriabin and his reverence for the piano music of Frederic Chopin. The orchestra gives a performance full of precision and the attention to detail that never escapes Boulez.
The "Poem of Fire" is even more mysterious and evocative to me than the "Poem of Ecstasy.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
I love this disc (which to be fair, has received very mixed comments). Boulez, with his typical focus on clarity, tackles this volcanic composer's overheated music with compelling results. It's not the only way to play Scriabin -- some may prefer a more overtly emotional thrust -- but it works.
The fabulous Chicago Symphony sounds thrilling, with the gleaming brass dominating but not overpowering the dense textures. I especially like this version of "Prometheus," which includes the choral part - here sung by the excellent Chicago Symphony Chorus.
Other versions may sound "more Russian" or be more passionate, but the approach here works on its own glittery, crystalline terms.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
By A Customer on Jan. 26 2000
Format: Audio CD
I own two recordings: the Ashkenazy and Ugorski. Both are good performances and I cannot say I prefer one to the other.
The Ugorski is a more brisk and technically brilliant performance. DG has produced a very nice sounding album, the quality of which certainly exceeds that of the Ashkenazy performance. The CSO has quite a reputation and I won't bother with further praise here.
Ashkenazy's somewhat slower tempi and more liberal rubatos yield a more romantic and less technically precise and rigid performance. The Ugorski, in some ways, lacks the strength of the former. Either performance is an excellent addition to one's collection.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0xa2ee3e88) out of 5 stars 12 reviews
23 of 24 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa6ed5fc8) out of 5 stars Another Wonderful Boulez Performance Aug. 6 2002
By Paul Rossi - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
In the absence of the availability of the Ashkenazy recording of these same works on the London CD label (I am a "library listener" right now!), I finally had a chance to listen to and study these orchestral works by Alexander Scriabin. I found myself feeling impressed.
Many critics and detractors constantly point out the overly analytical aspect of Pierre Boulez's musical interpretations, a fact he himself admitted to. However, I think that his thoughtfulness, knowledge of orchestral sonorities, attention to detail and architecture, and striving for perfection make for crisp, warm, and full-bodied interpretations.
The "Poem of Ecstasy" is performed with clarity, attention to detail, and an air of mystery. Boulez's French background give this piece an overall sound and feeling that recalls his recording of "Daphnis et Chloe," by Maurice Ravel. The trumpet plays with excellent tone and clarity. The strings seem to balance well with the rest of the orchestra. Perhaps there is too much of a feeling of Ravel and Debussy in this piece, but I find the interpretation very convincing. The final orchestral climax is most impressive, indeed!
Next, I found myself enjoying the collaboration of Anatol Ugorski and Boulez in the Piano Concerto in F-sharp minor and the "Poem of Fire." Ugorski plays with beauty, sensitivity, and crystalline clarity. He is an accomplished virtuoso pianist. Ugorski's playing shows the strong connection with Scriabin and his reverence for the piano music of Frederic Chopin. The orchestra gives a performance full of precision and the attention to detail that never escapes Boulez.
The "Poem of Fire" is even more mysterious and evocative to me than the "Poem of Ecstasy." One can hear the increase of fourth chords, augmented chords, whole tone scales, and tritone modulations that give Scriabin's sound world its unique sonorities. Once again, Ugorski gives a wonderfully detailed, evocative performance, and Boulez gives an outstanding accompaniment. The sound quality of this CD is absolutely outstanding!
Overall, I understand that the Ashkenazy recording of these works is the definitive performance and recording of them, but one cannot go far wrong with this CD. If you can overlook the "Frenchness" of this interpretation and don't mind thoughtful, analytical music-making, this CD is well worth your money and time investment.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xb3ac6284) out of 5 stars tender Scriabin -- does it need a bit more oomph? Aug. 28 2014
By Stanley Crowe - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
The "Poeme De L'Extase" (1908) comes across here like an impressionistic water-piece, with undulating figures forming the "backbone" (no, not the best word for a watery piece, but the best I can do!), in greatly varied orchestral guises, but often with the solo violin and solo flute rising out of aural mix to lovely effect, At times it sounds like a blend of early Schoenberg, with some gestures towards dissonance, and Tchaikovsky, but as it builds to what seem to me its climaxes (at approximately 9:00, 14:45, and 20:00 minutes), these moves (which never altogether lose the basic undulant character) are introduced by solo trumpet figures, with heavier brass to follow, until, in the final one, there seems to be some tubular bells in the mix, and a touch of Mussorgsky's "Pictures" comes to mind. The whole thing hangs together very well, and it's played with great refinement here. Is it too languorous? Maybe . . . there was a moment or two when I felt Boulez was going to cut loose with Stravinskian energy, but it never quite came. Still, a very nice performance.

The Piano Concerto comes across as the earlier piece that it is (c.1896)-- it is richly orchestrated, but a good deal of the piano writing is of a Chopinesque delicacy. The music moves by quite short motifs rather than extended melodic themes, and the piano and orchestra are collaborators rather than combatants. Ugorski's playing is lucid and beautiful throughout, and the highlight of the piece is the lovely middle movement, where the orchestra does most of the thematic work and opens and closes on a lovely melodic passage, while the piano winds its way around the orchestral material. The first and third movements are as well played, but less memorable in the impression they leave, and in this recording, I felt at times that the orchestra needed to be more present in the aural picture, not to the piano's diminution but precisely because their parts seem so intimately related. Overall -- as with the "Poeme De L'Extase" -- the effect was of tenderness, an effect perhaps more appropriate to the spirit of this piece than the "Poeme."

"Promethee" is a woolier piece than the others, requiring the full Romantic orchestra as well as a pianist (Ugorski again) and a wordless Chorus. As with the concerto, I felt that that the orchestral presence could have been better -- it all comes at one from a distance, not so great that the textures can't be savored, but still . . . I didn't find the piece itself particularly compelling, though the playing by all concerned seemed fine. Unlike the "Poeme," it came across as a series of "special effects" though one does realise that that there is shape to it, but not finally a highly interesting one -- to my ears at least.
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa29cdc60) out of 5 stars Cool Boulez meets fiery Scriabin April 16 2002
By Bruce Hodges - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I love this disc (which to be fair, has received very mixed comments). Boulez, with his typical focus on clarity, tackles this volcanic composer's overheated music with compelling results. It's not the only way to play Scriabin -- some may prefer a more overtly emotional thrust -- but it works.
The fabulous Chicago Symphony sounds thrilling, with the gleaming brass dominating but not overpowering the dense textures. I especially like this version of "Prometheus," which includes the choral part - here sung by the excellent Chicago Symphony Chorus.
Other versions may sound "more Russian" or be more passionate, but the approach here works on its own glittery, crystalline terms.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa354e870) out of 5 stars Incredible music April 5 2009
By B. Kemper - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
To be honest, I probably needn't bother with writing this: anyone looking at recordings of Scriabin's music knows that he was a genius (a bit bizarre personally, but a genius). So just in case you need a bit of prompting here: this is amazing, deep music. Not a lot of hummable tunes, but if you are looking here, you probably aren't that interested in hummable tunes anyway. Whether you are a fan of Scriabin's or not, buy this and listen to it multiple times. It is beautiful, deep, dark, a bit twisted, and just plain amazing.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa2815fcc) out of 5 stars a superb Poem of Ecstasy July 19 2006
By D. Jack Elliot - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This is a spectacular reading of the Poem of Ecstasy. Boulez's calculated logic and mathematical objectivity are not always effective in the mainstream, "common practice" repertory (his performances of the Mahler symphonies, for example, range from passable to simply awful, cold and emotionally disfunctional), but in the Poem of Ecstasy they reveal a masterpiece of thematic development and elegance of line. Where other readings (Neeme Järvi's, for example, recorded nine years earlier with this same orchestra) render this music an amorphous, directionless exercise in ambience, Boulez fascinates by his grasp of symphonic architecture and ability to bring subtle details of counterpoint and orchestration out of the dense texture. And what an orchestral performance!

As an aside, this was my first acquaintance with the Piano Concerto, and I was struck by how much it sounds like Chopin. By the time of the two symphonic poems on this disc Scriabin had come a long way down the radical experimental path he took in his short career; but the Piano Concerto is an earlier work, accessible and immediately likeable while still possessed of the progressive, experimental elements of Scriabin's writing in their early stages.



Feedback