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Postmodern Fairy Tales: Gender and Narrative Strategies Paperback – Dec 24 2004

5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press; 2nd Revised ed. edition (Dec 24 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0812216830
  • ISBN-13: 978-0812216837
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 1.3 x 21.6 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 136 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #749,270 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

Review

"An extraordinary book, and a 'first' on the topic."--Jack Zipes

"Examining the workings of the powerful desire machines built into postmodern versions of 'Snow White, ' 'Little Red Riding Hood, ' 'Beauty and the Beast, ' and 'Bluebeard, ' Cristina Bacchilega's astute rereadings uncover intriguing mirrorings and revisions."--Ruth B. Bottigheimer, State University of New York at Stony Brook

"Examining the workings of the powerful desire machines built into postmodern versions of 'Snow White, ' 'Little Red Riding Hood, ' 'Beauty and the Beast, ' and 'Bluebeard, ' Cristina Bacchilega's astute rereadings uncover intriguing mirrorings and revisions." Ruth B. Bottigheimer, State University of New York at Stony Brook"

"An extraordinary book, and a 'first' on the topic." Jack Zipes"

About the Author

Cristina Bacchilega is Associate Professor of English at the University of Hawaii at Manoa and editor of the Italian-language volume La narrativa postmoderna in America: Testi e contesti.

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Cristina Bacchilega's exploration of postmodern revisions and appropriations of fairy tales is a superb endeavor. She provides an excellent overview of the fairy tale as a genre and goes on to explicate narrative and gender strategies in well-known tales like "Snow White," "Little Red Riding Hood," "Beauty and the Beast" and "Bluebeard." She frames her analysis of postmodern tales through a deconstructive lens, looking for each revision's ability to challenge conventional fairy tale morals, to be both "questioning and affirmative without necessarily being recuperative or politcally subversive." Her approach is exciting and her analysis brings new depth and meaning to fairy tales, making the familiar new once again.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0xa24a9150) out of 5 stars 2 reviews
14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa24b1a80) out of 5 stars Postmodern Fairy Tales May 25 2000
By Jennifer Aldridge - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Cristina Bacchilega's exploration of postmodern revisions and appropriations of fairy tales is a superb endeavor. She provides an excellent overview of the fairy tale as a genre and goes on to explicate narrative and gender strategies in well-known tales like "Snow White," "Little Red Riding Hood," "Beauty and the Beast" and "Bluebeard." She frames her analysis of postmodern tales through a deconstructive lens, looking for each revision's ability to challenge conventional fairy tale morals, to be both "questioning and affirmative without necessarily being recuperative or politcally subversive." Her approach is exciting and her analysis brings new depth and meaning to fairy tales, making the familiar new once again.
HASH(0xa24b1df8) out of 5 stars Great fairytale scholarship March 3 2016
By Margaret - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Bacchilega outlines her main questions for this research in her introduction: "Three questions direct my efforts. What kind of images of woman and story do these rewritings/revisions project? What narrative mechanisms support these images? And finally which ideologies of the subject underlie these images? In short, this book explores the production of gender, in relation to narrativity and subjectivity, in classic fairy tales as re-envisioned in late twentieth-century literature and media for adults."

To this end, she analyzes the retellings of 4 fairy tales: Snow White, Little Red Riding Hood, Beauty and the Beast, and Bluebeard. She unpacks the works of writers such as Angela Carter, Margaret Atwood, and Robert Coover, just to name a few, in order to determine in what ways the authors use fairy tales to subvert the gender strategies of the original tales. She argues that these tales are postmodern in their deconstruction of gender politics within fairy tales. She focuses specifically on 'mirroring,' how these tales subvert by mirroring the originals, "while at the same time make the mirroring visible to the point of transforming its effects."

You need to have read The Bloody Chamber and Other Stories by Angela Carter before diving into this academic study. Bacchilega relies heavily upon Carter's retellings in every chapter. You can get by without being familiar with the other modern writers, though it's easy to find the short stories she uses online.

This is an excellent study for those interested in fairy tale research on gender. It is dense, particularly the introduction, but worth tackling.


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