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Harry Potter And The Prisoner Of Azkaban Children's Hardcover Hardcover – Jan 18 2011

4.8 out of 5 stars 2,039 customer reviews

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Hardcover, Jan 18 2011
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Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 317 pages
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Press; Classic ed edition (Jan. 18 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0747542155
  • ISBN-13: 978-0747542155
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 2.8 x 19.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 358 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars 2,039 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #97,070 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

From Amazon

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban is the third, and possibly the best, book in the phenomenally successful, award-winning Harry Potter series by JK Rowling.

After just about surviving yet another summer with the dreadful Dursleys, the arrival of Aunt Marge is the final straw and, in a fit of anger, Harry casts a spell on her, causing her to blow up like a balloon. He fully expects to be expelled from Hogwarts for his blatant flaunting of the rule not to use magic outside term time, but the arrival of the mysterious Knight Bus and a meeting with Cornelius Fudge, the Minister of Magic, result in Harry enjoying the rest of the holidays in the wonderful surroundings of the Leaky Cauldron.

Meanwhile Sirius Black--one-time friend of Harry's parents, implicated in their murder and follower of "You-Know-Who"--escapes from Azkaban and this has serious implications for Harry. Back at Hogwarts, Harry's movements are restricted by the presence of the Dementors--guards from Azkaban on the look-out for Black.

Stephen Fry's endearingly snooty vocal chords are a perfect match for Rowling's superb storytelling, and Fry manages to give even further depth to a complex and absorbing plot by adding an irreverent wit and a deep-rooted touch of class to a compelling and magical tale that, once heard, will never be forgotten. --Susan Harrison --This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition.

From Publishers Weekly

In this third installment in the projected seven-volume series, Sirius Black, imprisoned for killing 13 people with one curse, escapes from Azkaban. As he heads for Hogwarts, the chilling Dementors who trail him quickly descend upon the school. "Each successive volume expands upon its predecessor with dizzyingly well-planned plots and inventive surprises," said PW in a Best Books of 2001 citation. Ages 8-up.

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I've held out for so long, being a die-hard fiction fan, refusing to read the Harry Potter books. I usually stick with bestsellers such as MIDDLESEX or even the ubiquitous DA VINCI CODE (which,if you haven't read ARE great) but now I'm hooked on the HP series. No wonder Rowling wrote so many as she was in love with her characters as much as we all are. Great fun and not at all what I'd expect.
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By A Customer on Oct. 21 1999
Format: Hardcover
I put this 1* to get your attention, because i never read the 5*s. This book series is the best in the world. I have read all of them and i am half way through 'Philosphers Stone' for a second time. After I finished 'Philosphers Stone' I gave it to a friend to read because I thought it was sssssoooooo good. It took her a while to get into it, but as soon as she read chapter 2 she was loving it just as much as i had. It took her a while to finish it because she is the kind of reader who reads a bunch of books at a time. By the time she finished it I was already done 'Chamber of Secrets'and 'Prisinor of Azkaban'. Rowling has done it again by mixing you up, and then making you compleatly suprised by what happens at the end. I was SURE it was Professor Snape in 'Philosphers Stone', for who would of thought it was Professor Qurirrell who was supposedly afraid of everything he taught? And then in 'Chamber of Secrets', i was sure it was Malfoy. If you ever read this review, J.k, I'm telling you, you have one super dee duper sence of a wonderful imagination!! Please email me!! Your #1 fan Emilie Cox
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Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
It was surprisingly a good read. I enjoy it very much. Harry finally stood up on his own (against the Dursley) makes me smile. Ah, the joy of seeing them panic over magic... just like good old days in Book 1. The author is good in leaving her readers with several suspicions as to who Sirius really is. The answer is very satisfying. I also enjoy reading about all the exciting classes the students have at Hogwarts. (especially Professor Lupin's and the ever-so-useful Marauders' Map)
I recommand this wonderful book for anybody thrilling for an exciting read.
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Format: Paperback
Harry and his friends go to Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry for the third year. Just before they get back to school, a prisoner – Sirius Black – escapes the wizard prison, Askaban. He is supposed to be a crazy murderer and from Lord Voldemort’s side. Is that the truth?

Then there is Buckbeak, the hippogriff – yet another fantastical creature brought to the school by Hagrid. While Hagrid is absolutely fascinated by such beasts, the school students – especially those belonging to Slytherin – Malfoy, Crabbe and Goyle – don’t agree. Black and Buckbeak are both in danger of being killed by the Ministry Of Magic officials. Will Harry and his friends be able to save them?

For the first time, the students have a good – no, great – defense against the dark arts teacher in the form of Professor Lupin. But, what they don’t know is that he is a werewolf. While Snape helps Lupin with the perfectly made potion so that the latter feels better, the former can’t wait to let everyone know that Lupin is a werewolf.

Ron and Harry also take up the new subject, Divination, much to their regret. Professor Trelawney keeps predicting Harry’s death during every class. If she had had her way, Harry would have died a few hundred times during his third year.

Dementor – another magical being introduced in this book. But unlike most others, Dementors are horrid creatures that suck the happiness out of souls and if allowed the souls themselves. Harry learns to make a ‘patronus’ to chase away the dementors. There is no witch or wizard his age who could produce a full-fledged patronus.

Hermione takes up three times as many subjects as the rest of the other students.
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Format: Hardcover
As Harry and friends enter the emotionally charged teen world, this third volume in the series has become one of my favourites. From tormented family memories to gruesome mass murder to infernal government corruption, our heroes face many problems beyond the typical for thirteen year olds. And they find ways to conquer these trials and emerge triumphant. Harry, Ron and Hermione fight the power!

So many topics and themes to cover in what could be described as the first truly adult book in the series. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by J.K. Rowling starts with our first real taste of the corruption inside the Ministry of Magic, since it is not spelled out in the text, but I firmly believe they are aware of Sirius Black's innocence. Just a feeling, a vibe so to speak, I pick up from J.K. all along the way. But this is kept top level secret, hence even the Hogwart's Professors not knowing the truth. Harry is treated like a child (to prevent him from finding the truth), lied to (once he starts getting pieces of the truth), and not listened to (when he speaks the truth). All these experience give him the courage and knowledge to speak back to the know nothing adults throughout the other tales to come. Sometimes it feels like Harry in the only honest man in a room full of liars. Good for him!

The central issue the Ministry of Magic is trying to scrub clean is another decidedly mature concept. Never shown, even by Pensieve, is the mass murder slash terrorist attack which Sirius Black was imprisoned for. Death has been apart of J.K.'s writings straight from the start, and the subject of parental demise is a common trope, but the destruction of so many unnamed innocents is slightly more rattling then the norm for a book aimed at young adults. And I give J.K.
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