CDN$ 20.64 + CDN$ 3.49 shipping
Only 1 left in stock. Sold by thebookcommunity_ca
+ CDN$ 3.49 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by Round3CA
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Shipped next day from GA, United States. All products are inspected and playing quality guaranteed (excluding any digital content). Our friendly multilingual customer service team will be happy to resolve your queries.
Compare Offers on Amazon
Add to Cart
CDN$ 27.69
+ CDN$ 3.49 shipping
Sold by: @ ALLBRIGHT SALES @
Add to Cart
CDN$ 30.90
+ CDN$ 3.49 shipping
Sold by: Founders Factory JPN4CA
Add to Cart
CDN$ 50.38
+ CDN$ 3.49 shipping
Sold by: langton_distribution
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Private Press Import

4.1 out of 5 stars 74 customer reviews

Price: CDN$ 20.64
Only 1 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by thebookcommunity_ca.
12 new from CDN$ 20.64 8 used from CDN$ 1.28


Product Details

  • Audio CD (June 4 2002)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Mca
  • ASIN: B000067AT9
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars 74 customer reviews
  •  Would you like to update product info, give feedback on images, or tell us about a lower price?


1. (Letter From Home)
2. Fixed Income
3. Un Autre Introduction
4. Walkie Talkie
5. Giving Up The Ghost
6. Six Days
7. Mongrel Meets His Maker
8. Mongrel Meets His Maker
9. Right Thing/GDMFSOB (Clean Instrumental Version)
10. Monosylabik
11. Mashin' On The Motorway
12. Blood On The Motorway
13. You Can't Go Home Again
14. (Letter From Home)

Product Description

Product Description

Asian Re-pressing featuring a Bonus Six Track EP.

Amazon.ca

Countless copycats have landed on the bandwagon since Josh Davis's debut, Endtroducing..., wreaked havoc in the dance and hip-hop world. But Davis, a.k.a. DJ Shadow, kept on top of his game with various collaborations--Blackalicious, U.N.K.L.E., Cut Chemist--and superlative 12-inches like "High Noon" and "Pre-Emptive Strike."

Now, a full six years later, he's back with a follow-up that is every bit as impressive as his debut, albeit in a different way. Once again, the producer has pushed his sampler to the limits, but this time he's brought with it a deeper, hungrier, more bad-ass spirit that's rarely found in modern dance music. There's a fabulous '80s vibe throughout (principally on tracks like "Monosylabik" and "You Can't Go Home Again"), along with the expected forays into b-boy culture (check the growling, massive "Treach Battle Break" and the funky-ass "Mashin' on the Motorway"). While it's identifiably Shadow, it ain't Endtroducing...Part 2. It is, however, a worthy and imaginative follow-up, with humor, wisdom, and musical understanding aplenty. --Paul Sullivan


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
For his second real album (I think of Preemptive Strike as a compilation rather than a cohesive unit), DJ Shadow delves even deeper into his fascination with eerie samples and odd voices. The Private Press is not quite as brilliant as his debut, but DJ Shadow still knows how to put together a gorgeous, torpid patchwork of sound that is instantly identifiable as his own.
The first song on the album, "Fixed Income," is classic DJ Shadow. He takes the march of a drum beat and marries it to some mysterious acoustic guitar samples (including something that may have come from a Spaghetti Western) and an ominous bass. Throw in a voice here and there and you've got the direct descendant of Endtroducing's "Midnight in a Perfect World." Wicked and addictive.
Skipping ahead, "Giving Up the Ghost" is a tough name for a song to live up to, but Shadow delivers in spades. Disenchantment, disillusion, doubt, regret -- all conveyed by one sample in a loop that makes up the first sixty seconds. I find that this song gets stuck in my head when I get in that kind of a mood. Extremely evocative and more than a little sad.
This is followed by the shimmering torpor of "Six Days," and the fast-paced but downright creepy "Mongrel...Meets His Maker." A single meandering guitar ties the song together, augmented by a flute, a piano, and a ringing telephone(!) Along the same lines, "Blood on the Motorway" brings to mind the morbid transcendentalism of "What Does Your Soul Look Like, part 2," but with some decidedly 80s-ish samples used to achieve the effect. That three-second silence speaks volumes, like the transition from life to death or ignorance to knowledge. Hypnotizing and profound without being maudlin or heavy-handed.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
DJ Shadow is perhaps the most innovative musician of the latest decade, at least of those, who received relatively noticable attention. With his debut, "Endtroducing", he created a whole new genre of instrumental hip-hop music entirely made of samples. His rare talent and attention to details ensured that even now "Endtroducing" stands as a template for such music, and nobody succeeded in getting anywhere close to it. Following such a success often proves impossible for artists. Did Shadow manage to do it?
On "Private Press" Shadow leaves that specific retro-feel of "Endtroducing" behind him, and goes for a modern sound. It results into more variety to tracks, and even addition of a vocal part in a couple of them. He strays further away from hip-hop and funky rhythms of his debut, successfully adding a touch of rock, and electronica beats. DJ Shadow tries to create an aural adventure, a sonic movie of sorts, and I'd say the results are fairly good. Spoken samples add to the "adventure feel".
But on the down side of this variety, this record doesn't sound as consistent as the debut, because not all the ideas really work. To me, personally, the addition of a singer is a very questionable novelty (it's what killed the creativity in Chemical Brothers). While Shadow manages to pull it with taste, the tracks "Walkie Talkie" and "Six Days" are not equal to the rest of the album. And somehow they spoil the flow of the musical adventure. Other than this relatively small gripe, the album is very good. It's great to see Shadow is still as creative and perfectionistic musician, as he proved he was in 1996. I'm looking forward to hearing more from him in future.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
The irrepressible beat master and mixing wizard shines on his latest outing. If this album falls short compared to some of his previous efforts, Shadow makes up for it with originality.
THE PRIVATE PRESS would be %100 groove-friendly if it weren't for one little complaint: I feel he overuses sampled speech. I suppose this practice lends the proceedings more personality, but with repeated listens, I get tired of hearing the same vocal interjections. The music would flow more smoothly without %80 of it (and it's the FLOW I'm usually after when it comes to this kind of music).
I also didn't appreciate hearing the sample of the "El Condor Pasa" intro from one of the biggest albums of all time, BRIDGE OVER TROUBLED WATER by Simon and Garfunkel on "You Can't Go Home Again." However, I'm more used to it now and it is an intriguing mix none the less.
I know, these are pretty picky complaints. By far, this music is totally tripped out and extremely groove-worthy. Kudos to the Shadow.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
So Private Press falls a little short, but come on now, did it ever really have a chance of equalling Entroducing? Nope. If he did produce an Entroducing... sound-a-like he would have been nailed as unoriginal and banking on his previous successs,like that album Moby released after Play that sounds exactly like Play. So Shadow tries something new and goes for primarily 80's source material instead of soul, jazz, funk and RnB. And yet people break his balls for "straying to far" from his own sound. What kinda crap is that? Yes I know what ur thinking, the 80's...yech, but Shadow pulls it off and manages to bring a little respect to musics ugliest decade. Hey, you gotta hand it to him, who woulda thought you could make hip-hop outta new wave samples? Private Press has a definitely more anguished, aggressive and manic feel then Entroducing... On tracks like "Right Thing/GDMFSOB" and "Walkie Talkie" Shadow brings furious breaks, and even uses a Leonard Nimoy "pure energy" sample. "You Can't Go Home Again" is simply epic. The double standard is completley unwaranted here; Private Press sounds distincley Shadow and yet nothing like Entroducing... By any other artist this would be a hailed as a classic. Too bad hes got that other album constantly hanging over his head.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse

Most recent customer reviews



Look for similar items by category


Feedback