1 used from CDN$ 64.15

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Psycho

2.5 out of 5 stars 187 customer reviews

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1 used from CDN$ 64.15


Product Details

  • Format: Special Edition, NTSC
  • Number of tapes: 1
  • MPAA Rating: R
  • Studio: Universal Music Group
  • VHS Release Date: Aug. 28 2001
  • Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars 187 customer reviews
  • ASIN: 0783243456
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #554 in Video (See Top 100 in Video)
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Product Description

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Numerous critics had already sharpened their knives even before Gus Van Sant's shot-for-shot color "re-creation" of the 1960 black-and-white Hitchcock classic was released, chiding the Good Will Hunting director for defiling hallowed ground. This intriguing cinematic curiosity, though, is hardly as sacrilegious as critics would lead you to believe. If anything, Van Sant doesn't take enough liberties with his almost slavish devotion to the material, now updated with modern references. At times, you wish Van Sant would cut loose with a little spontaneity, a little energy, a little something. Unfortunately, when he does venture outside Hitchcock's parameters, with inserted shots of storm clouds during the murder sequences, it's to little effect. Granted, he liberally splashes color throughout the film (especially in the case of the infamous shower scene), and this is a great-looking movie, but in his obsession with adding a new physical dimension to the film, there's little insight into these characters that Hitchcock hadn't already provided. Vince Vaughn, a robotic and giggly Norman, doesn't crawl under your skin the way boy-next-door Anthony Perkins did, and Anne Heche is admirable if not very sympathetic in the Janet Leigh role. Van Sant does score a minor coup, though, in his casting of the supporting roles: Julianne Moore provides a welcome shot of energy as Heche's irritable and curious sister, William H. Macy is a perfect small-time detective, Viggo Mortensen is studly enough to make you understand why Heche would want to run away with him, and James LeGros walks away with his one brief scene as a used car salesman. And Danny Elfman's gorgeous rerecording of Bernard Herrmann's score is a potent supporting character unto itself. Students and fans of the original film will get a kick out of the modern revisions, but don't expect anything of Hitchcockian caliber; watch it for the sum of its intriguing parts, but not the whole. --Mark Englehart --This text refers to the DVD edition.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I love the cast list in this movie. It was also directed to match the original movie scene by scene. Check it out! Vince is sooo gorgeous in this, even with his psychotic baby face! And for the boys, naked scenes!!!
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By EA Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on Feb. 23 2014
Format: DVD
When asked why he made a shot-for-shot remake of Alfred Hitchcock's "Psycho," Gus Van Sant reportedly said "so no one else would have to."

That is not a good enough reason.

While remaking one of the greatest movies in history is a bad idea in itself, the 1998 remake of "Psycho" is an exercise in hollow tedium, laziness and bad casting. Van Sant does not even try to put any kind of personal stamp on the movie, instead piggybacking off the skills of Hitchcock himself -- and what little he does contribute is bizarre and/or disgusting.

Secretary Marion Crane (Anne Heche) is entrusted with $400,000, which she's supposed to deposit in the bank for her employer. Instead, she steals the money for her impoverished boyfriend, Sam Loomis (Viggo Mortensen). She ends up staying overnight at a remote motel, where the only other people are the owner Norman Bates (Vince Vaughn) and his crazy invalid mother.

Then someone kills Marion in the shower. Believing his mother is responsible, a desperate Norman cleans up the crime scene and hides the body. Meanwhile, Marion's sister Lila (Julianne Moore) is doing her best to find both her sister and the $400,000, hiring a private eye and trying to figure out where Marion went before her disappearance. Teaming up with Sam Loomis, she begins seeking out whoever saw her last -- but neither of them are prepared for the true horror of Bates Motel.

Imagine that someone allowed you to pick up and handle the Mona Lisa. You lay a piece of thin paper over it and trace over the painting. What you have after that is not a piece of timeless deathless art.... but a hollow, soulless copy that just follows the same lines.
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Format: VHS Tape
Perhaps if the film makers behind this video anachronism had actually invested some originality into their project, taken Hitchcock's original plot and showed us a new perspective, or perhaps even adapted one of original author Robert Bloch's sequels to the Norman Bates saga, almost anything other than a pointless shot-by-shot and line-by-line colorization of the original masterpiece, then maybe this would have been something other than an empty waste. But they didn't, and it is. Some have tried to justify this remake by claiming today's moviegoers-especially the youth--don't know the original and won't watch a black & white movie. Well, that's their loss. The original Psycho's black & white photography was so beautifully manipulated it actually looks better than the remake, color or not. Anne Heche and Vince Vaughn are adequate as Marion Crane and Norman Bates, but they don't make anybody forget they're not Janet Leigh and Anthony Perkins. On the other hand, Julianne Moore as a spazzed out Lila Crane is a disaster, and takes every one of her scenes like the bad medicine they are. Viggo Mortenson's Sam Loomis is even worse, an empty-headed redneck evidently just looking for a cheap feel. Bottom line? If you want to see Psycho, arguably the most terrifying thriller ever filmed, skip this one and see the original.
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By tmp on April 6 2001
Format: VHS Tape
I thought this when I first heard that there was going to be a shot-for-shot remake of Psycho, and I repeated it when I finally saw it. Why? Psycho is a great movie- one of the best. It changed the way that thrillers we seen, and movies were made. But you can no more re-create the impact that it had in 1960 in 2000 than you can recreate the way the country felt when JFK was shot. Up until then, no movie would have killed off the heroine in the first 20 minutes; no movie would have even shown a toilet at that time for god's sakes. There's no way that a contemporary audience can be jolted by this movie in the same way that Psycho did in 1960.
Also, since the movie actually does not recreate shot-for-shot every scene, you have to wonder why they didn't do a little more updating. The dialogue between Sam and Marion at the hotel, which seems fine in the 1960 version, seems incredibly stilted in the 90's. "These long lunches give my boss excess gas" or whatever it was- people don't talk like that anymore. The whole buying the new car scene rings really false (and California license plates stopped having 6 characters in the 70's), and do we really need Vince Vaughn making it all to clear what he is doing at the peephole?
van Sandt said that he really wanted to introduce the original to a new geneeration, maybe he did just that. I certainly popped my copy of the Hitchcock classic into the VCR after the last reel of this turkey, and had a much better time.
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Format: VHS Tape
No one-word review could be more accurate, I reckon. This film was meant to be a tribute to Hitchcock's eternal and ageless masterpiece and instead it came across as a painfully pathetic film that was virtually unwatchable. I always thought a masterpiece should never be remade because the result could never be nothing short of an insult. I couldn't get past the infamous shower scene, because I just couldn't believe what I was seeing. It was, in fact, shot word for word, scene by scene. Plus new "innovating" scenes that really made this film fall really low. I always have said that there can only be one person who could play the role of Norman Bates effectively and that was/is Anthony Perkins. Forty years ago, when Hitchcock released his film, times were way different. You didn't need to spill excessive amounts of blood on screen or use sex or vulgarity to conquer an audience.
Well, forty years later, times have changed, have changed aplenty. One scene in particular made me sick in this new version of Psycho, and it convinced me not to watch it any further. When Norman is watching Marion in the bathroom, you can hear him unzip his pants...and (well, guess what he's doing as she's stripping her clothes off?)the whole film was extremely sick. Not sick as in gross, but just a sheerly disrespectful version of a film that should NEVER have been redone.
It may have been an attempt at a tribute to the best suspense film ever made but the end result is a shameful, disrespectful film that is nothing other than a waste of time.
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