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RINO 110 TWO-WAY RADIO RINO 110 W/AMERICA POINT DTBS

5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.
  • Combination two-way radio and GPS receiver
  • Radio specs: 14 FRS channels for 2-mile range, 7 GMRS channels for 5 mile range, 38 subcodes per channel, hands-free VOX,
  • GPS specs: 12-channel, WAAS-enabled receiver, up to 500 waypoints, trip computer with speed tracking
  • Beam location to another Rino user within a two-mile range using the FRS spectrum
  • Waterproof construction, includes lanyard and belt clip

Garmin Back to School



Product Details

  • Product Dimensions: 5.1 x 10.2 x 19 cm ; 363 g
  • Shipping Weight: 408 g
  • Item model number: 010-00270-00
  • ASIN: B000065DQ1
  • Date first available at Amazon.ca: June 14 2010
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #736,734 in Electronics (See Top 100 in Electronics)
  • Discontinued by manufacturer: Yes
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Product Description

Garmin Rino 110 Portable Navigator 010-00270-00 Handheld Navigators


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Top Customer Reviews

For those who love to hike, camp, hunt or enjoy outdoor activities, this little device may soon become a standard. It has remarkable communications range, with the option of choosing from the Family Band (range: 2 miles or so) or the wider-ranging (but more battery-consuming) General Mobile Radio Service (5 miles or so). These frequences aren't used nearly as much as other bands and are more likely to be free from unnecessary cross-talk and interference, which makes for clearer communication. But what makes this stand out from standard outdoor devices is the GPS satellite link, which allows you to pinpoint your position accurately, and even has a feature that keeps tabs on your trail, making backtracking a breeze. You can also send your current position to another person (as long as they are using one of these, of course), which is handy if someone gets separated, hurt, or needs assistance. In addition, they are waterproof up to one meter (so dropping one into a stream--as I did--won't kill it), and it's pretty durable--one of my friends dropped his nearly twenty feet onto rock, and it still works! All of these features help account for the somewhat high price, and since they are sold singly, count on having to buy two or more. But they are more than worth the cost, especially for those who take their outdoor activities seriously. Highly recommended.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0xa17ceb40) out of 5 stars 36 reviews
45 of 46 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa16d7204) out of 5 stars In the field Aug. 8 2004
By J. Sanford - Published on Amazon.com
I am presently stationed in Iraq and our unit purchased dozens of the Rinos. My Rino has survived 145 degree temeratures, sand, grime water, and the other hardships that we find here and has never missed a beat. I feel good knowing I have it with me as we fly about the desolate terrain here. The accuracy is exceptional and it does an excellent job of tracking everyone operating another Rino. Yes, the radio is a bit weak, but if we rely on other systems for that. I can see no better value for the recreational GPS user than the Rino. If it's good enough for an Army aviation unit, I believe it's good enough for Joe Citizen out on the hiking trail. Can't wait to see what Garmin comes up with next (keep them ruggedized, pls!).

JS
57 of 61 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa31c59e4) out of 5 stars A must for outdoors people Nov. 19 2002
By Christian Wheeler - Published on Amazon.com
For those who love to hike, camp, hunt or enjoy outdoor activities, this little device may soon become a standard. It has remarkable communications range, with the option of choosing from the Family Band (range: 2 miles or so) or the wider-ranging (but more battery-consuming) General Mobile Radio Service (5 miles or so). These frequences aren't used nearly as much as other bands and are more likely to be free from unnecessary cross-talk and interference, which makes for clearer communication. But what makes this stand out from standard outdoor devices is the GPS satellite link, which allows you to pinpoint your position accurately, and even has a feature that keeps tabs on your trail, making backtracking a breeze. You can also send your current position to another person (as long as they are using one of these, of course), which is handy if someone gets separated, hurt, or needs assistance. In addition, they are waterproof up to one meter (so dropping one into a stream--as I did--won't kill it), and it's pretty durable--one of my friends dropped his nearly twenty feet onto rock, and it still works! All of these features help account for the somewhat high price, and since they are sold singly, count on having to buy two or more. But they are more than worth the cost, especially for those who take their outdoor activities seriously. Highly recommended.
33 of 35 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa191e790) out of 5 stars Rhino in Iraq Dec 8 2003
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
OUTSTANDING to say the least. I carried a Rhino 110 for a year during operation Iraqi Freedom. It suffered more abuse in this year than any normal person would subject it to in 2 lifetimes. The radio performed well when other handheld radios failed from abuse and dirt. The GPS is user friendly and proved to be as accurate or more accurate than Army issue. I personally know at least 20 other soldiers who are using either Rhino 110s or 120s here who are equally satisfied with this piece of equipment. The only hiccup I have found so far is the unit will shut down from a sharp blow, but it will always power up again.
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa188ad14) out of 5 stars Very good. May 3 2005
By SKULLY DOG - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
It seems that you either love or hate the Rino 110 Frs/Gmrs/Gps. Before I bought mine, I had heard of some that used theirs in Iraq and loved them, and some that left them in the sand. But I must say that I love mine. I got it last week and have put it through a few paces, and so far it is great. It looks and feels solid...even before you put the batteries in, which give it a nice heft. The only problem that I have seen is the fact that when you use the GPS and GMRS radio at the same time, you can almost feel the alkaline batteries draining. But I fixed this when I went to 2300 mAh Ni-Mh batteries. As they say, it just keeps going and going. It is also nice (considering where I live in the Pacific Northwest) to not have to worry about getting it wet. And also not to have to carry both a GPS and separate radio. I also just bought the data cable (got it on ebay for only 3.25 FRNs!) so I can download all the latest software updates from Garmin. BTW, this little sucker is just a little bit complicated, but the menus are intuitive and the guide book well written.
23 of 26 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa1a98240) out of 5 stars Fun Toy, Awkward Tool May 8 2003
By Orome - Published on Amazon.com
These radios cram a lot of great features in a package that almost fits in a pocket. And the price isn't bad for the combination of a decent radio and an adequate GPS, especially when you can do neat things like broadcast your position to other Rinos so that it appears on their GPS map display. But all these great features only really work if you are paying close of attention. There are simply too many features to use conveniently as part of any real outdoor activity. A superb, well thought out user interface might solve the problem, but that's not what you get with this product -- not by a long shot. Garmin has done a decent workmanlike job with its menus and buttons, but it simply isn't nearly enough to save these from being much more than toys.
Two further points worth noting. The longer range GMRS radio does not broadcast location information, and in order to use GMRS you must apply for a license with the FCC, involves a fee and several very confusing forms.