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Ragged Glory

4.7 out of 5 stars 60 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (Sept. 11 1990)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Reprise
  • ASIN: B000002LMK
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars 60 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #6,325 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)
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1. Country Home
2. White Line
3. F*!#in' Up
4. Over and Over
5. Love To Burn
6. Farmer John
7. Mansion On The Hill
8. Days That Used To Be
9. Love and Only Love
10. Mother Earth (Natural Anthem)

Product Description

Product Description

Rockin' 1990 album with CRAZY HORSE back in the saddle! Features"Fuckin Up", "Mansion On The Hill" & "Mother Earth"

Amazon.ca

After a long period of unfocused weirdness, Young spotted grunge around the corner and declared unity with the loud, scruffy sounds coming from Seattle. The countryish ballads, such as the opening "Farmer John", get roaring Crazy Horse treatment, and the headbanging "Fuckin' Up" is the most self-effacing rock anthem since the Who recorded "I'm a Boy". Amid the clatter, though, there is beauty: Crazy Horse's sympathetic backup vocals turn "Mansion on the Hill" into a pretty pop song despite the electric guitars, and even the white noise that closes the 1990 album is soothing in a scream-therapy kind of way. --Steve Knopper


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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
I feel compelled to respond to the two reviews below ( the one star and two star raters), this is an album for the ages. A sign of the times, a snap shot of the 90"s. There aren't many musicians that can adapt to the musical movements and tastes of a certain period and generation. Neil remains one those of the special artists. However, that said, I totally get that those two particular reviewers, who are totally in the minority by the way. They moved on to something else musically. How unfortunate their appreciation for this is no more. No one can torture a guitar like Neil can, and still make it sound so soulful. Just buy it...you won't be sorry. Read all the other "positive" reviews if in doubt.
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Format: Audio CD
In the first chapter of the grunge and garage Bible, it is written that Neil told his followers to turn the amps up to 11. But master, said his disciples, "the amps only go to 10". When they looked back down, the amps had miraculously been turned way past 10. In the next chapter, Neil told his disciples to lay down a mostly country music style backbeat, and they did. But, the scripture from the gospel according to Neil that is most widely quoted among those preaching his gospel to this day is the one where he proclaimed "You will play till your fingers bleed, and then you will play some more!!". Make no mistake, this is the holy scripture of any band that even has a remote connection to garage or grunge. While there are many musicians preaching the scripture according to Neil today, no one will ever be able to replicate the feeling of Ragged Glory. It will stand as a testament for generations to come on how massive double lead electric guitar rock is supposed to sound. This CD may sit in the CD stack unplayed for periods at a time, but it's always going to sound glorious, just as the title implies. There isn't a bad song on the album. You'll be looking for that proverbial "11" on your stereo too.
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By A Customer on Sept. 20 2002
Format: Audio CD
I love Neil Young, and when you have a musician who seems to improve with every album, or who is practically a musical shape-shifter like Neil Young who seems just as comfortable rocking out as he does strumming his acoustic folk. This album is very heavy on rocking out, and that is a real treat to Neil's fans. Obviously Neil has many followers, in fact Pearl Jam plays some of his songs pretty frequently in their concerts, including the song "F@#king Up" which is a standout track on this album. This album sounds like a group of friends (which all happen to be gifted musicians) joined together in a garage, turned up the amps, and tried to ... off the neighbors. It has Neil's loose feel to it, after all, only Neil could have recorded this album. I Even though it isn't his most well known, you will love it especially if you like his rock side, or even if you are a fan of Pearl Jam or Nirvana, cause there are elements of his music in both those bands. If you are looking to get into Neil Young, this is the perfect place to start, and if you like Neil Young, there is no reason not to have this album. It's really remarkable that a musician like Neil can stay relevant for so long. His albums from the sixties are just as important as his albums now, and just as good. ...this album is just as good as his stuff in the 80's 70's and 60's. He really hasn't lost a step, and he truly is a living legend. Great Album.
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Format: Audio CD
In a previous life, in the Days that Used to Be, Neil Young was a raptor, not the bird but the alpha among one of those astonishingly intelligent packs lizards that hunt cooperatively as they depopulate those Jurassic Park movies. Sometimes, in this incarnation, waves of that past life no doubt wash over Mr. Young on nights when the moon is full and his kundalini flows unabated lighting up his power chakras like the starting lights at a drag strip. At such times, his guitar becomes a weapon that cuts through the fog which settles over the mind, raging torrents of feedback and power.
On these musical odysseys Neil Young clearly hears something we do not----perhaps sirens luring him ever closer to a point of no return beyond the White Line. Perhaps he fastens a manacle around his ankle, chaining himself to Mother Earth and tells Crazy Horse to follow me. Like Odysseus'crew, oblivious to the siren's lure, Crazy Horse takes to their instruments, propelling Mr. Young along, as he fires electric salvos Over and Over (and Over and Over, and Over and Over) in homage to his muse.
Poor Crazy Horse valiantly labor to keep up as they construct the musical scaffolding that Mr. Young repeatedly ascends. This music will not conjure up images of a rustic Country Home set among manicured gardens but it will rattle the windows in the home.
This music is fun in the same way a mosquito zapper brings joy when you hear that loud "zppppttt" sound and perhaps see a flash of blue light should you be in the right place! Ahhh, the pleasures of Ragged Glory!!
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Format: Audio CD
Wanna see a bunch of 70's folkies run? Just put on Ragged Glory and crank it up. This definitely isn't the Neil Young that I suffered through highschool with in the early 70's. It's not that he didn't write great songs. It's not that he couldn't sing. It's not that I was listening to too much Jeff Beck and Ten Years After at the time. I'ts just that I had too bad memories of those Neil Young folkie wannabees who liked to bring their acoustic guitars to school and give their own lame (and flat) renditions of "Heart Of Gold" or "Only Love Can Break Your Heart". Ugh. So, I never was a big fan. But then Neil Young met this little garage band called Crazy Horse, and everything was good again. Which brings us to this Raggedly Glorious album. What a way to wring out the New Wavish 80's and bring in the Grungy 90's. Yes this is sloppy. And yeah, it's noisy. But it's also melodic. And it's also some of THE best Neil Young songwriting since those early 70's days. It's a very unique album that's mixes stretched out notes of distortion ( a great Crazy Horse trademark) and extended guitar solos that, as the old 70's phrase goes, "I can really get into man". Songs like the great 7 minute opener "Country Home", which is actually one of Young's leftover songs from the 70's with Crazy Horse that he had never recorded before. And "Mansion On The Hill" feature some of Young's best songwriting of his career. They also can play some flat out mean grungy Seattle type rock with the excellent 60's garage classic "Farmer John" and "Love To Burn". I love the way they end this too, with a kind of acapella version of Mother Earth done live with just a hint of a quietly distorted guitar playing in the background. Young doesn't sound half bad when he's singing a chorus with someone else. Especially on a song this catchy.Read more ›
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