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Real-Time 3D Terrain Engines Using C++ and DirectX9 Paperback – Jun 30 2003

3.6 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews

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Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 374 pages
  • Publisher: Charles River Media; 1 edition (June 30 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1584502045
  • ISBN-13: 978-1584502043
  • Product Dimensions: 23.6 x 18.8 x 2.6 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 794 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,612,620 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Review

PART I: A Foundation In 3d 1 Chapter1 Getting Started With Directx 9.0 Andd3dx Chapter 2 Fundamental 3d Objects Chapter 3 The High-Level Shader Language Chapter 4 Gaia Engine Overview PART II: Introduction To Terrain Systems 97 Chapter 5 World Management Chapter 6 Basic Terrain Geometry Chapter7 The Roam Terrain System Chapter 8 Tiled Geometry Techniques Chapter 9 Texturing Techniques PART III: Extending The Engine 221 Chapter 10 Big Sky Country Chapter 11 Rendering Outdoor Scenes Chapter 12 The 3d Gardener Chapter 13 Ocean Water Appendix A Gaia Utility Classes Appendix B Floating-Point Tricks Appendix C Programming Reference Sheets Appendix D Recommended Reading Appendix E About The CD-Rom

About the Author

Greg Snook (Sammamish, WA) has been a game programmer and artist for over eight years. He has worked on a number of successful games with several game development companies. He currently works as an Xbox programmer for Bungie Studios, and has contributed to all three volumes of the Game Programming Gems series.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Not an easy book to learn from, all the code from the first demo program on up use the (complicated) final engine to do their rendering, and you'll have to go spelunking through it to try and figure out what's going on. The emphasis of this book is on the whole game engine itself and you're locked into his way of doing it, you're never given smaller programs that teach you how to do specific topics, it's all or nothing.
The first third of the book barely touches on terrain, you'll get overviews of things like memory management, resource pools, High Level Shader Language, render queue's, and a dozen other topics. And if you already have your own systems for these things or don't like his systems, too bad, because they are interwoven in the code throughout the rest of the book and it's difficult to seperate it out.
Like the review above, I have to agree that the terrain looks a bit aged for such a new book, and it runs slow on my P4 2.4ghz with GeForceFX card. I've seen plenty of recent games that look much better and run smooth as silk on my setup. You'll need a very high end system for his techniques to run smoothly on.
It's hard to recommend this book when you'll find much better tutorial code on the internet that's more to the point and has better looking results than you will get in this book. It does bring many techniques all together, but not in an easily learnable format when it comes to actually programming it.
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Format: Paperback
This is a tough book to recommend. If you need your hand held through detailed examples, this is not a good source at all, especially since the sample programs are (1) overly complex and platform-dependent and (2) slow and ugly. On the other hand, this DOES discuss texturing, quadtrees, a few CLOD algorithms, sky and water rendering, Perlin noise, and a few other things as they relate to terrain, and can be a useful source of ideas for the not-quite-novice. Yes, most of the information here can be found on the web, but that's true of practically any programming book.
By the way, a MAJOR annoyance here is the really rather astounding number of typos and basic usage errors ("discreet" vs. "discrete," etc) that somehow were not caught in editing. There seems be a trend to this effect in game programming books lately, but this one is really exceptionally error-ridden.
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By A Customer on March 23 2004
Format: Paperback
this book doesn't give you any background or theory on how to create a terrain engine. insted it only shows you code, code and more code!
The little theory presented here seems to be the one in DirectX SDK documentation and it only uses of D3DX functions...
Well... don't buy it!
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Format: Paperback
The book is exactly how the title describes it. It is developing a 3d terrain engine and if that is what you are looking to do then this is well worth the 30 bucks, in my opinion. The author is an experienced programmer and it shows through the code. The design of the engine is elegant and if you learn nothing else from the book you will at least walk away with a better understanding of engine design.
The book not only shows you the theory behind terrain programming but also resource management, scene management and integrating pixel and vertex shaders. This book seems to always be laying around open on my desk.
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Format: Paperback
Basically, I'm a professional OGL/D3D programmer and rather because I don't have days to devote to discerning the differences between DX8.x's PS/VS pipeline and the DX9 pipeline, I have found this book to be a great segway into porting to DX9. You don't need any previous DX experience to get a ton out of this book; however, I would recommend some 3D experience prior to indulging in its mysteries. The author writes very practically and well, and explains the problems and solutions to large scale terrain rendering clearly and informatively.
I can't recommend this book enough.
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Format: Paperback
Not an easy book to learn from, all the code from the first demo program on up use the (complicated) final engine to do their rendering, and you'll have to go spelunking through it to try and figure out what's going on. The emphasis of this book is on the whole game engine itself and you're locked into his way of doing it, you're never given smaller programs that teach you how to do specific topics, it's all or nothing.
The first third of the book barely touches on terrain, you'll get overviews of things like memory management, resource pools, High Level Shader Language, render queue's, and a dozen other topics. And if you already have your own systems for these things or don't like his systems, too bad, because they are interwoven in the code throughout the rest of the book and it's difficult to seperate it out.
Like the review above, I have to agree that the terrain looks a bit aged for such a new book, and it runs slow on my P4 2.4ghz with GeForceFX card. I've seen plenty of recent games that look much better and run smooth as silk on my setup. You'll need a very high end system for his techniques to run smoothly on.
It's hard to recommend this book when you'll find much better tutorial code on the internet that's more to the point and has better looking results than you will get in this book. It does bring many techniques all together, but not in an easily learnable format when it comes to actually programming it.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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