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Reality

4.1 out of 5 stars 145 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (Sept. 16 2003)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Sony Music
  • ASIN: B0000AR8NK
  • In-Print Editions: Audio CD  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars 145 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #15,692 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)
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1. New Killer Star
2. Pablo Picasso
3. Never Get Old
4. The Loneliest Guy
5. Looking for Water
6. She'll Drive the Big Car
7. Days
8. Fall Dog Bombs the Moon
9. Try Some, Buy Some
10. Reality
11. Bring Me the Disco King

Product Description

Product Description

Limited Edition Japanese pressing of this album comes housed in a miniature LP sleeve. 2007.

Amazon.ca

Expectations have long been the mixed blessing of David Bowie's illustrious, if at times frustrating career. Whether he addresses the inherent paradoxes of his own chameleonic past on this loose concept album (or, given his statements arguing that there's "not any ultimate reality," is it anti concept?) is almost beside the point: The real glue that holds it together is the renewed strength of Bowie's songwriting. If his success at reinvention arguably went off the rails sometime between the dance-club affectations of Let's Dance and Tin Machine's noisy, overweening art-rock, he continues the renewed embrace of basics heralded by Heathen here. Not surprisingly that album's producer, Tony Visconti, has returned, framing Bowie's muscular efforts in ever more ambitious and far-ranging productions that paradoxically echo both Bowie's modern Manhattan roots and his 60's-70's musical prime (an era during which Visconti was often a key collaborator). Be they oblique, if cutting commentaries on current geo-politics (the Low/Heroes-era evoking "New Killer Star," "Fall Dog Bombs the Moon" and "Looking For Water"), surprising cover choices (Jonathan Richman's "Pablo Picasso" all dizzy and beefed-up; a suitably grand, Wall-of-Sound recreation of Ronnie Spector's obscure, George Harrison-penned "Try Some, Buy Some") or more personal concerns (the vaguely Incan "Days"; the rhythmic Low-isms of "Never Get Old"), Bowie's work here is powered by a renewed sense of dramatic focus and musical purpose that's refreshingly free of the shackles of fashion and self-imposed reinvention. It's true you can't go home again; but damned if Bowie hasn't found his most compelling music in decades trying. --Jerry McCulley


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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
If you found this review, you're probably specifically looking for the Reality SACD. It's fairly hard to find, because sony has done a poor job of issuing this release. First of all, its a CD/SACD hybrid, so why they decided they needed to issue a regular cd version, a special edition version and a hybrid SACD version of this release is beyond me. Secondly, the SACD release date was pushed back for so long that many people who might have bought the hybrid disc have already purchased one version or another. This might explain why stores don't seem to be stocking the SACD version--they probably have more than enough unsold special editions sitting on their shelves. Sorry for the rant, but sony's approach to sacd pisses me off: first they issue sacd only discs that won't play on a normal cd player, then when they finally realize how stupid that was and issue hybrid discs like this, they screw it up as well.
That said, this is a very good production from Bowie. Nothing jaw-dropping (though Pablo Picasso might come as a shock to Modern Lovers fans), but not boring either. Given that the album's music has more of a "live" sound, it's not surprising that the 5.1 mix is pretty straight forward. There's a few songs where the drums and effects are spread out to the surrounds, but Bowie's voice mostly stays center. Sounds good though.
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Format: Audio CD
The limited edition includes 3 songs not on the normal release - FLY, QUEEN OF ALL THE TARTS, and REBEL REBEL. Rebel Rebel is a totally new version, and it's pretty incredible. Now for the CD ... This is brilliant! "NEW KILLER STAR" starts the album with a big bang. Bowie is hooky and edgey all at once! Then he covers "PABLO PICASSO" which some may remember from the film REPO MAN. The album continues in a very strong way, and I find it hard to describe. BOWIE has always been about art rock, and combining many elements not unlike a painter who is using sound as his landscape. He changes with every album, but at the core is a strong voice and an impeccable poet. The last song on this outing is called BRING ME THE DISCO KING. It's probably a dig at the music that became pop in the 70s that killed his own art rock/glam revolution. This CD is produced along with long time collaborator Tony Visconti. It combines jazz with techno - sort of TONIGHT meets EARTHLING if you can imagine. You need this if you're a fan! The most interesting release so far this year as far as I'm concerned. Others can have their pop princess, but for me this year is all about Bowie.
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Format: Audio CD
On the allmusic.com website, this album was likened to capturing the sound that "Heroes" through Scary Monsters explored between '77 and 1980; Heathen was apprently the rekindling of music between Hunky Dory and Low. I really fail to see that connection. While I understand that Bowie was more melodically-minded on Heathen - I think motivated and anchored by what seemed to be a need to prove himself as an energetic and tight songwriter - and thus may have appealed to a more Ziggy-minded, glammy audience, I think he was aiming to convey a certain peacefulness (or even softness). His early '70s works, I would argue, don't take that road. They don't really try. Reality does, however, speak of the sonic raucous that Bowie was flexing within Heroes (especially tracks 1,2,4,5), parts of Lodger (tracks 3,9), and Scary Monsters (tracks 1,3,6,7,8). There's a more treble-oriented scraping in the foreground with a lot of tracks on Reality, which at times struck me as a kind of purposeful distraction from some of the smoother undertones. His singing, while more appealing and adventurous on Heathen, is no less impressive (outstanding on "Try Some, Buy Some", "Fall Dog Bombs the Moon", "Reality", and the highlight "Bring Me the Disco King"), as he hits dead on all the right notes (and perfectly lands the wrong ones- something I've always admired about his singing).
Absolutely worth buying, this album is good for much exploration on the listener's part.
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Format: Audio CD
Unlike "Heathen," which I fell in love with immediately, this album is so drastically different than anything he has done in years, that it took 3-4 full listens to have it grab ahold of me. Many of the songs on this album bring back the flavor of his 70's work, yet with modern music technology and edge. If you loved "Scary Monsters" and earlier Bowie albums, you will LOVE this album. It's destined to be a CLASSIC. Some standouts on the album are "New Killer Star" "Pablo Picasso" and "Never Grow Old." He then slips effortlessly into a more "sultry" Bowie (the sad type of music that haunts you for hours, which he has become known for) with songs like "The Loneliest Guy" and "Bring me the Disco King." Those two songs could be easily compared with "The Motel (from 1995's "Outside") and "The Bewlay Brothers" from the classic "Hunky Dory." They are eerie and dark, and practically put you in a trance. The title track is similar to his style on the "Outside" album, in that it has a very industrial feel like the song "Hallo Spaceboy." Then there are the uptempo, pop-style songs such as "Days" and "Fall Dog Bombs the Moon." This album is a GEM, and is Bowie at his Best in YEARS. Vocally, it is more impressive that "Heathen" as his pitch is higher for nearly the whole album, sounding like the younger Bowie. No two albums from Bowie are alike. It's amazing. After a few listens, you will be hooked. I HIGHLY RECOMMEND THIS ALBUM to anyone, not just Bowie fans!!!
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