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Remembering Our Childhood: How Memory Betrays Us Hardcover – Mar 22 2009


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (March 22 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0199218404
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199218400
  • Product Dimensions: 21.8 x 2.5 x 13.7 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 399 g
  • Average Customer Review: Be the first to review this item
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,628,040 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

Review

Lively investigation. Andrew Robinson, Lancet Never less than fascinating. William Leith, Financial Times A terrific book. Sabbagh's journey into childhood memory shows keen insight into how it works and what it means. He offers a masterfully original and beautifully written perspective on one of the most fundamental aspects of the human mind. Elizabeth F. Loftus, Distinguished Professor, Department of Psychology and Social Behavior, University of California, Irvine

About the Author

Karl Sabbagh was educated at King's College, Cambridge, where he studied experimental psychology. He then spent many years as a documentary television producer for broadcasters in the U.K. and the U.S. before becoming a full-time writer.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3.7 out of 5 stars 3 reviews
0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Such a sad story. It has taken her years to recover ... July 9 2014
By Susan - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A friend (and her family) were traumatized by a well meaning (I guess) therapist who convinced her that her depression stemmed from being satanically abused as a child. Such a sad story. It has taken her years to recover from those fraudulent "recovered memories” that he encouraged, perhaps placed, in her psyche.
4 of 9 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars dull and very dated Feb. 1 2013
By Anonymous - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
this book starts with an obvious bias rather than looking at the topic opening

also many recent scientific research has been shown to demonstrate the *traumatic* memories cannot be falsely remembered and are often repressed as a coping mechanism, all this is ignored in the book - really the author needs to start again since he has ignored nearly all post-2000 research
2 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Scientific Approach To Memory And False Memory Syndrome Nov. 4 2012
By Douglas - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The author notes near the end of the book that "serious scientific research rarely makes it into the public consciousness." How sadly true. It is much easier to read pseudo-science "self help" tripe and let some self-proclaimed therapist (mind-rapist?) brainwash you into what you remember than it is to actually read a scientifically based book on memory like this one. Remembering Our Childhood shows how our memories work, and often don't work, and gives us much better ideas about when to trust them and when to doubt.


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