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Requiem for a Dream / Pi (Double Feature)

4.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Format: NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Studio: Alliance Films
  • Release Date: Feb. 24 2009
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews
  • ASIN: B001NHX3OE
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #41,688 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)
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Product Description

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Requiem for a Dream
Employing shock techniques and sound design in a relentless sensory assault, Requiem for a Dream is about nothing less than the systematic destruction of hope. Based on the novel by Hubert Selby Jr., and adapted by Selby and director Darren Aronofsky, this is undoubtedly one of the most effective films ever made about the experience of drug addiction (both euphoric and nightmarish), and few would deny that Aronofsky, in following his breakthrough film Pi, has pushed the medium to a disturbing extreme, thrusting conventional narrative into a panic zone of traumatized psyches and bodies pushed to the furthest boundaries of chemical tolerance. It's too easy to call this a cautionary tale; it's a guided tour through hell, with Aronofsky as our bold and ruthless host.

The film focuses on a quartet of doomed souls, but it's Ellen Burstyn--in a raw and bravely triumphant performance--who most desperately embodies the downward spiral of drug abuse. As lonely widow Sara Goldfarb, she invests all of her dreams in an absurd self-help TV game show, jolting her bloodstream with diet pills and coffee while her son Harry (Jared Leto) shoots heroin with his best friend Tyrone (Marlon Wayans) and slumming girlfriend Marion (Jennifer Connelly). They're careening toward madness at varying speeds, and Aronofsky tracks this gloomy process by endlessly repeating the imagery of their deadly routines. Tormented by her dietary regime, Sara even imagines a carnivorous refrigerator in one of the film's most memorable scenes. And yet... does any of this have a point? Is Aronofsky telling us anything that any sane person doesn't already know? Requiem for a Dream is a noteworthy film, but watching it twice would qualify as masochistic behavior. --Jeff Shannon.

Pi
Patterns exist everywhere: in nature, in science, in religion, in business. Max Cohen (played hauntingly by Sean Gullette) is a mathematician searching for these patterns in everything. Yet, he's not the only one, and everyone from Wall Street investors, looking to break the market, to Hasidic Jews, searching for the 216-digit number that reveals the true name of God, are trying to get their hands on Max. This dark, low-budget film was shot in black and white by director Darren Aronofsky. With eerie music, voice-overs, and overt symbolism enhancing the somber mood, Aronofsky has created a disturbing look at the world. Max is deeply paranoid, holed up in his apartment with his computer Euclid, obsessively studying chaos theory. Blinding headaches and hallucinogenic visions only feed his paranoia as he attempts to remain aloof from the world, venturing out only to meet his mentor, Sol Robeson (Mark Margolis), who for some mysterious reason feels Max should take a break from his research. This movie is complex--occasionally too complex--but the psychological drama and the loose sci-fi elements make this a worthwhile, albeit consuming, watch. Pi won the Director's Award at the 1998 Sundance Film Festival. --Jenny Brown

Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
Both of these first two films by Darren Aronofsky have much
to recommend them. Viewed together, they show the start
of one of the truly original voices in film today. I don't
always love all elements of Aronofsky's films, but I always respect
him for his willingness to take on big themes, and tell stories
in unique and challenging ways. Here are my comments on
these two films;

Pi - so odd, brave, idiosyncratic and haunting, that I want to forgive it it's flaws.

Made on a shoestring, but using those limitation to create a unique
look and style, this is a psychological thriller about paranoia and
ideas, that puts you inside the lead character's head as he slowly
cracks up, trying to figure out the mathematical basis of all life. He
gets mixed up with Hassidic Jews who think he may have found the true
name of god, and wall street traders who want his secret for riches.

Full of surreal touches, it's not always clear what's real and what's
in our lead character's head - but rather than being annoying, that
only pulls you in deeper. To me it recalled great surreal earlier films
like "Eraserhead", and "Seconds", but on speed.

"Requiem for a Dream" - Amazing on a purely cinematic level -
assaultive, hyper-kinetic, full of breathtaking images and cuts.
The performances too range from good
(Jared Leto) to extraordinary (Ellen Burstyn).

But for me, after a while, the style becomes the substance, and I'm
ever more aware of the filmmaking rather than the story and characters,

Also, other than 'drugs are bad', I'm not sure what Aronofsky is really
getting at.
Read more ›
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Two amazing films, but unfortunately this package comes in full screen format.
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