Buy Used
CDN$ 2.46
+ CDN$ 6.49 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Ships from the USA. Please allow 2 to 3 weeks for delivery.  Light wear to edges and pages. Cover and spine show no easily noticeable damage. A tradition of quality and service.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Rise Of The Creative Class: And How It's Transforming Work, Leisure, Community And Everyday Life Hardcover – May 1 2002

3.7 out of 5 stars 41 customer reviews

See all 18 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
CDN$ 18.76 CDN$ 2.46

Unlimited FREE Two-Day Shipping for Six Months When You Try Amazon Student
click to open popover

No Kindle device required. Download one of the Free Kindle apps to start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, and computer.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product Details

  • Hardcover: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Basic Books (May 1 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0465024769
  • ISBN-13: 978-0465024766
  • Product Dimensions: 24.4 x 16.3 x 3.4 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 726 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars 41 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #149,222 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  •  Would you like to update product info, give feedback on images, or tell us about a lower price?

Product Description

From Booklist

Florida, an academic whose field is regional economic development, explains the rise of a new social class that he labels the creative class. Members include scientists, engineers, architects, educators, writers, artists, and entertainers. He defines this class as those whose economic function is to create new ideas, new technology, and new creative content. In general this group shares common characteristics, such as creativity, individuality, diversity, and merit. The author estimates that this group has 38 million members, constitutes more than 30 percent of the U.S. workforce, and profoundly influences work and lifestyle issues. The purpose of this book is to examine how and why we value creativity more highly than ever and cultivate it more intensely. He concludes that it is time for the creative class to grow up--boomers and Xers, liberals and conservatives, urbanites and suburbanites--and evolve from an amorphous group of self-directed while high-achieving individuals into a responsible, more cohesive group interested in the common good. Mary Whaley
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

Review

"An exhaustive study that ought to be read by every city planner and economic developer who wants to thrive in the next century.... It tells us a lot about ourselves, where we've been and where we are going." --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.

See all Product Description

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
A very uncreative book dealing with what is supposed to be an interesting and exciting topic. Does Richard Florida discuss the new creative class of individuals that have been tinkering in their garages for decades now, changing all facets of society; from entertainment and art, to technology and health? No. Florida casts his definition net so wide that he's caught all the fish in the sea.

In the book, he basically defines someone in the creative class as someone who thinks creatively. He even goes so far as to say that the house cleaners he employs can be considered somewhat part of the creative class, as they are at liberty to do their work when and how they please. It is almost irrefutable that each and every human has the capacity to be creative - I would like to hear about a previously unrecognized class of people that ooze creativity and are changing their own lives and their society because of it. But no. Instead; lawyers, doctors and engineers of all stripes are part of Florida's Creative Class. I have had a hard time getting through this book because it's so dry, but even up to Chapter 8, he has hardly, if at all, discussed artisans, artists, entrepreneurs, tinkerers, makers, etc.

Even aside from Florida writing a book about something that simply discusses anyone who is middle class and up, the book reads like a university textbook. This is not a book you want to read on the bus to work, lest you miss your stop and ride the bus all the way back to where you got on. Instead of a book bursting with interesting and exciting anecdotes, making you feel anxious about missing out on the creative revolution... we get a book with charts, statistics and discussion of cracker-dry everyday phenomenon.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Florida's idea of a creative person is the software engineer who develops alternate downloadable ring tones for your telephone, or the Saturn engineers and marketers who come up with fake wood aftermarket car dashboard appliques. This is a degraded definition of creativity, one sure to include just about everyone in society up to and including the roofer installing an asphalt shingle on your roof, provided she makes the critical choice of applying the shingle one quarter inch to the right rather than one quarter inch to the left.
In its own sweet way, Florida's "creatives," or at least his watered-down definition of same, is as prejudiced as classic racists, homophobes, and sexists. Only instead of attempting to shunt blacks to the back of the bus, Florida's burgeoning "creative" managers are sending the working class factory jobs to China and the service class jobs to India. Having to live near these people, it would seem, is too painful for someone who markets Viagra for a living.
3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I read every single page. This revised edition of the book has been thoroughly revised with five new chapters. It departs from the original version of the 2002 book that the term Creative class has evolved. Florida explains that the term "used to mean artists and writers. Today, it means job stability" (p. viii), and contends that for prosperity and jobs to happen, there is a need to convert every job into a 'creative job.' 'Every human being is creative' is the key thesis of "The Rise of the Creative Class Revisited," as in the original version of the 2002 book. With a clear and engaging message, Florida addresses his critics throughout the book and presents updated data from various scholars in the field to support his position.

The aim to capitalize 'creativity' is powerfully argued in this book. Florida demonstrates that the Creative Class now comprises more than thirty percent of the entire workforce. But to his surprise, metros with the highest rank in Creativity Index, tended to have the highest level of inequality. He addresses these perplexities later in the book. However, one thing is for sure, Working and Service Classes thrive in regions with high concentration of the Creative Class. Furthermore, the author stresses that the Creative Economy is not about capitalistic discourse; instead, it is about innovation, business and culture. He ascertains the recognition of the Creative Economy where creativity is the key driver of today's economy, as creativity needs to be commoditized in lieu of being wasted; insisting that the key task of the future must be to fully engage the creative talents of ALL.

The author speaks to the issues of inequality as well.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Dr. Florida offers both Rise of the Creative Class--Revisited: 10th Anniversary Edition--Revised and Expandeda delightful fast-paced account of historical futurism and a useful lesson on the futility of socioeconomic forecasting. In some ways the text seems to be inspired by Jules Verne's futurist novels. The difference, of course, was that Verne was offering fantasy, and Florida is trafficking in preposterous 'futures'. Not long after the publication of the book, the author's future collapsed - teachers were laid off, politics roared back to a dim pre-history, Sillycone Valley's 'creatives' spend their spent creativity on insignificant apps for a bored generation. But not all was lost, of course. Creativity continues to flourish on Wall Street.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse

Most recent customer reviews



Feedback