Buy Used
CDN$ 0.66
+ CDN$ 6.49 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Shipped from the US -- Expect delivery in 1-2 weeks. Shows some signs of wear, and may have some markings on the inside. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Shipped to over one million happy customers. Your purchase benefits world literacy!
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Rose's Story Paperback – May 2003


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, May 2003
CDN$ 57.39 CDN$ 0.66

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
click to open popover

No Kindle device required. Download one of the Free Kindle apps to start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, and computer.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product Details

  • Paperback: 136 pages
  • Publisher: Waveland Pr Inc (May 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1577662970
  • ISBN-13: 978-1577662976
  • Product Dimensions: 1.3 x 14 x 22.2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 91 g
  • Average Customer Review: Be the first to review this item
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,976,740 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  •  Would you like to update product info, give feedback on images, or tell us about a lower price?

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet on Amazon.ca
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0xa58db15c) out of 5 stars 64 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa58e5300) out of 5 stars Exceptional Feb. 18 2007
By Jessica M. Warters - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
In Rose's Story Wanda Bibb describes her life in painful detail and explains how her life was affected by her environment as well as her personal characteristics. She talks about everything from foster care and welfare, to her abuse as a child and an adult, as well as the birth of her children and her fight to keep them. The book illustrates how once a person has a mental diagnosis professionals they come in contact with tend to assume that any problems that person has is related to that diagnosis whether that be the case or not.

It is impressive that during this book Ms. Bibb retains a positive attitude when ever she can and never seems to show ill will to those who have wronged her unless completely necessary where as many people in the same situation would be unable to do the same.
HASH(0xa58dbb28) out of 5 stars eye-opening view into the history of social services and the authors survival Dec 19 2015
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This “letter” is such an eye-opening look into where social services was nearly 70 years ago and how for the next almost 40 years, it didn’t change that much. It starts off with Rose with her siblings and foster siblings when she was 4 years old in 1947. Rose’s earliest memory was her already in the “system”. It is no wonder that the cycle continued to Rose’s children also being in the “system”, since being pawns in the social services arena became a way of life. In fact, this is the only life she knew. Being in a home with loving and stable parents was something Rose never got to experience.
All Rose’s life, she has been a victim of abuse. Starting back with when she was 4, she was a victim of abuse by her sister Julia. Julia played the roll of a bully pretty much anytime these two were involved with each other. Julia, also a pawn of the “system”, used deception and stealing to get her way, since having a relationship was of no value to her. An example was when Rose was in first grade, and Julia lied to welfare officials that abuse was occurring at the foster home they were staying at. This of course wasn’t true, however the sisters were removed and placed in the Children’s Receiving Center.
Rose’s attempts to form relationships were almost always met with either resistance or was short lived and was uprooted again. Nearly every person in Rose’s story has failed Rose in some way or another. It’s a wonder she was even mentally healthy enough to even write this letter and express her feelings and share her experiences. Rose’s had relationships with the following people, with the listed outcome on how they failed Rose:
1) Julia repeated bullying, physical/emotional abuse
2) Bascum Family physical/emotional abuse
3) Dad and Stepmom deception, physical/emotional abuse
4) Fisher family sexual abuse
5) Girl’s boarding school physical/emotional abuse
6) Miss Ely social worker failed in any role
7) Mrs. South & Wendall sexual, physical/emotional abuse
8) Greta emotional abuse
9) Elton emotional abuse, abandonment
10) Gene decided to marry someone else
11) Walter drinking, emotional abuse
12) Debra emotional abuse, deception

The social workers and CPS staff played an incredible role in making Rose’s life very difficult. None of the defined roles as we know them today were exhibited by any of the staff. Phil, a welfare worker, broke confidence and used his relationship with his girlfriend Doris. Doris was counseling Rose, and wasn’t aware of the conflict of interest until after she confided in Doris. Phil played Doris to get to Rose and her children. Ruth, another social worker, insisted on placing controls on Rose to limit what she does and where she goes and whom she sees. This was something Ruth thought no one prior to her has done yet. This action goes against the concept of self-determination. Throughout the 40 years of state involvement in Rose’s life, all she knew was others telling her what to do or ultimatums and threats to coerce her to sign over rights. In fact in one instance, someone in CPS control forged a paper giving away custody. Rose refused to sign and a year later it was discovered in her file with her signature on it, or at least a signature on it purporting to be hers.
There are so many examples of what not to do, with respect to social worker values and ethics. It’s amazing that this 80-page story has as many disturbing violations as it does. Deception to gain compliance should never be tolerated. Self-determination is a pillar in social work ethics. True recovery is only as good as the weakest component of the effort. In other words, if deception and trickery is used to gain compliance, then is it really compliance if it was done under false pretenses? Another example is stability of the placement. There comes a point when the natural parents with their best efforts and support, are not going to be able to care for and raise their children. That point needs to be addressed sooner than the examples in this story. You have now multi-generational CPS involvement with the CPS workers, using trickery and deception to find a means to achieve their own agenda. All that really did, was make it easier for Cynthia the legal aid attorney to get rulings and judgments in favor of Rose. Had CPS just allowed Rose to make her own decisions with the assistance of resources in the community, then the true and undefensive Rose would come out and parent naturally. If then a need for services arose, including placement, then that would be truly in the children’s best interest and a court could back it up. If placement was necessary and within a determinant amount of time, Rose couldn’t rehabilitate, then permanency should be considered. It is my feeling that 2-3 years should be the guideline in deciding when the best interest of the children outweigh the desire to reunify in homes where factors are unsupportive.
This story was incredibly eye opening for my career choice and me. I originally was considering Addiction counseling and substance abuse. However, this story has me really thinking about social work and the legal system. The impact this revelation should be a wakeup call to remind everyone in the social services profession, that lives are on the balance and social workers are needed to guide and educate and advocate, counsel and mediate. Not to undermine the clients and deceiving them. There will be no faith or confidence in social services if this were to continue. Families won’t know who to trust or where to turn for help without feeling or scared that their children will be forever removed from their homes. Its stories like this from the past that has made having such an aggressive and transparent ethics review and sanctions.
HASH(0xa819445c) out of 5 stars a must read for anyone SWK 121 CLC Nov. 4 2015
By Daisy - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Rose's story opened my eyes to learn more about how the Social Welfare System worked in the 1900s. I enjoyed reading and learning about a client's side of the story who lived most of her life in the Social Welfare System and having multiple Social Workers. It gave me a different persepective in how many individuals can fall in the cracks of the Social Welfare Systems. This book shows the importance of Social Workers informing their clients in what will happen and the changes they want to do. Without this informed consent, clients like Rose may fall in the cracks and will feel emotional stress about their living situation. This is a great book for future Social Workers to understand the importance of reaching the client's needs as much as possible and the emotional effects that one can face while dealing with a casework. On the other side, it gives future Social Workers to see the positive outcomes that clients can face while having a positive and healthy relationship with them.
Hopefully Rose will continue to publish the progress of her family and her been making!
HASH(0xa5b2d528) out of 5 stars Captivating read. Aug. 27 2015
By K. Grimm - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book was required reading for an Introduction to Social Work class. The author, one who fell victim to a complicated and flawed system, suffering from many health problems and mental illness and put into terrible foster situations, writes purely in her own words with minimal editing. This is not a narrative with many flowery details or information added for literary effect. It is straightforward, simplistic, and because of its bluntness, I think, kept me attentive throughout the story. It highlights the horrors of a foster care and welfare system from the 40s throughout the late 80s. The book continually shocked me. The matter-of-fact way that "Rose" writes about the atrocities she suffered only broke my heart more. It left me frustrated and angry at the system-- which, in current day, I hope has made great strides in improvement-- and proud of the author for surviving it all. A good read for those interested in the social work and mental health systems.
HASH(0xa5a92330) out of 5 stars SWK 121-003 Dec 16 2015
By Jackie Hernandez - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book was required reading for an Intro to Social Work class. The author, one who fell victim to a complicated and flawed system, writes purely in her own words with minimal editing. This is not a narrative with many flowery details or information added for literary effect. It is straightforward, simplistic, and because of its bluntness, I think, kept me attentive throughout the story. It highlights the horrors of a foster care and welfare system from the 40s throughout the late 80s. The book continually shocked me. The matter-of-fact way that "Rose" writes about the atrocities she suffered only broke my heart more. It left me frustrated and angry at the system-- which, in current day, I hope has made great strides in improvement. This touching yet stark autobiography offers a firsthand look at adaptation and survival in an environment full of contradictions and imperfections. Rose speaks on behalf of many clients who fall through the cracks in our social welfare systems. A good read for those interested in the social work and mental health systems.


Feedback