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The Run of His Life: The People v. O.J. Simpson Hardcover – Sep 4 1996

4.4 out of 5 stars 23 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 466 pages
  • Publisher: Random House; First Edition edition (Sept. 4 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0679441700
  • ISBN-13: 978-0679441700
  • Product Dimensions: 4.4 x 16.5 x 25.4 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 748 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars 23 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #296,334 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

From Amazon

Just when you thought everyone and their second-cousin had published a book on the most famous criminal proceding of the century, along comes a book about the trial that actually deserves to be read.

Jeffrey Toobin's coverage of the trial of O.J. Simpson for The New Yorker magazine was the first to focus on the reality that no one wanted to addresss directly, but that pervaded every moment of the trial and perhaps even the crime itself - that race was at the heart of everything. Toobin's explosive article in July 1994, "An Incendiary Defense," laid out the defense lawyers' strategy, fingered Mark Fuhrman as their chief villain, and made the "race card" the euphemism of choice.

In The Run of His Life, Toobin's reporting, based on his unprecedented access to sources to the sources on all sides, lets us see, in a fresh light, the prosecutors, defense attorneys, private eyes, waiters, dog walkers, cops, ex-football stars, TV personalities, forensic experts, and so many others. He also offers an insightful examination of the larger questions raised by the case - including the importance of celebrity, race (and the way it's manipulated in the media), California as both a state and a state of mind, domestic violence, American jurisprudence, and the efficacy of the jury system.

From Library Journal

Toobin was an assistant U.S. attorney before joining the staff of The New Yorker, which published "An Incendiary Defense," his groundbreaking article on the O.J. Simpson case in its July 25, 1994 issue. This will be a big book, but as the contents are deemed "highly confidential," we can't say much more.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Here's hoping this one comes back into print soon. Toobin presents a nice narrative here, with plenty of the juicy inside stuff, without losing sight of the two tragedies that occurred: the horrible, bloodthirsty slaughter of Ron and Nicole, and the acquittal of a clearly guilty murderer. If anyone out there seriously still believes in O.J.'s innocence, it's time to check out of Denial Land. The cynical playing of the race card is detailed thoroughly, as is the star-struck way that Ito handled his courtroom. Toobin is not blind to the mistakes of the prosecution, but he sees equally clearly that "Guilty" was the only possible verdict a juror could have reached (I don't know what the twelve people empaneled in this case were, but jurors they most definitely were not). Toobin has an eye for the telling detail, and his writing skills make this a sometimes fun, sometimes sorrowful, journey through the most unjust trial of modern times. Highly recommended.
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Format: Hardcover
For almost a year, my mother and I shared a guilty pleasure, reading - and exchanging - every book we could get about the O.J. Simpson trial. They ranged from the surprisingly good (Christopher Darden's story of growing up in the Bay Area), to the worst kind of whine-fest (Marcia Clark showing herself to be the biggest crybaby and excuse-maker I've ever read).
After finishing Jeffrey Toobin's take on the case, I quit reading O.J. Simpson books because I realized that this was the best, most balanced portrayal out there. In the first place, he was one of the few writers that didn't have an ax to grind. And secondly, he has a nice storytelling manner that makes for a great read.
If you read one book to get a picture of the O.J. Simpson trial, and its place in the American context, this is the one.
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Format: Hardcover
After you read this book, you will be left with no question that O.J. Simpson is guilty of killing Ron and Nicole. Toobin makes no secret that he is convinced of O.J.'s guilt, and lays out the evidence which overwhelmingly proves that O.J. did it. Toobin also shows the personalities of the attorneys on both the defense and prosecution. We learn how the egos of all of the attorneys got in the way of them doing their jobs, how the prosecution failed to do even a minimally professional job, and how the jury was swayed by outside information and by internal racial pressures. Toobin's book is fascinating, even years after the trial ended.
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Format: Hardcover
I had read an review that said that there was nothing new in this book. Despite that I bought the book, and was very plesantly surprised to find it to be the best and most complete book of anything I have read on the OJ trial. From a description of the arrogrance and ego of the defense team to the inempitude and occasional brilliance of Darden, I found it very multi-dimensional and fascinating reading. The best part of the book was his two line description of how OJ lost his Beverly Hills/West LOs Angeles contigent of friends after the DNA's evidence was presented. It appears that there truly is a god
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Format: Hardcover
Whether or not you agree with the verdict is irrelevant; Jeffrey Toobin has written an excellent account of the trial that mesmerized and ultimately polarized the American public. Toobin gives a dispassionate and convincing analysis of the various legal stars: Johnny Cochran's grandstanding, Marcia Clark's arrogance, Chris Darden's bumbling incompetence, and Barry Scheck, the nuts-and-bolts lawyer whose hard work and diligence help swing the evidence in favor of his client. Toobin also shows us the seamier side of the LAPD, most despicably manifested in the persona of Mark Fuhrman, the rogue cop whose racist ramblings helped undo the prosecution's case. But Toobin also shows compellingly that in a Los Angeles courtroom, the prosecution had no case; there was no way a LA jury, made up mostly of members of ethnic groups who had been routinely victimized and brutalized by the LAPD for generations, was going to convict OJ Simpson, whom they saw as another black man being set up by a racist police force. The fact that OJ Simpson was probably the "whitest" black man in America (he once said "I'm not black, I'm OJ") didn't matter to this jury; as one juror bluntly put it, "we have to take care of our own". The Simpson verdict split America right down the middle on racial lines; whites were outraged; blacks felt vindicated; whites were outraged that blacks felt vindicated; blacks were outraged at whites' hypocrisy (would whites have been so upset over the verdict had OJ been married to a black woman? and where was the outrage from whites when white men were routinely freed by all-white juries in the south after lynching black men with impunity?) and around and around it goes. There has been so much hysteria around the OJ Simpson trial and its outcome that it is refreshing to read a factual, even-handed account such as Toobin gives us here. It's a thoughtful, well researched, excellent work of journalism.
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Format: Hardcover
Jeffrey Toobin has no doubt that O. J. Simpson killed his wife, Nicole, and her friend, Ron Goldman. Therefore, the driving question of the book is not "did he commit the crime?", the question is "why was he acquitted?". Toobin's thesis grows out of local Los Angeles history as well as national U. S. history. Los Angeles is a microcosm of the United States because it is a city, just as ours is a nation, divided along racial lines. Toobin's study makes it quite clear that what is at issue in this divide, more than opportunity, more than economics, more than political clout, is trust. Distrust runs deep between the races. In Los Angeles, this distrust defined the jury and shaped the jury's verdict. Toobin explores how the defense formulated a strategy to exploit this racial divide and how the prosecution minimized or ignored how feelings and perceptions borne of racial identity would effect this trial. As the familiar story unfolds, Toobin details the prosecution's very strong case against Simpson. For the prosecution, the crime was in the details: hairs, fibers, blood drops, blood smears, gloves, footprints. But could this jury trust the gatherers and interpreters of this evidence? No. They didn't trust the police, criminalists, or lab technicians. They didn't trust Marcia Clark. They didn't trust a system of police and prosecution and the reason was historical racial mistreatment. Yes, Toobin examines the conflicts between attorneys. He examines the performance of Lance Ito. He evaluates the attorneys' performances on both sides. But what he does best is illuminate the insidious consequences of of our country's long history of racial mistreatment. In this case, argues Toobin, a murderer walked free.
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