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Scenes From a Marriage

4.7 out of 5 stars 17 customer reviews

Price: CDN$ 68.37
Only 1 left in stock - order soon.
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Product Details

  • Actors: Liv Ullmann, Erland Josephson, Bibi Andersson, Gunnel Lindblom
  • Producers: Lars-Owe Carlberg
  • Format: Box set, Color, DVD-Video, Special Edition, Subtitled, NTSC
  • Language: Swedish
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 3
  • MPAA Rating: PG
  • Studio: Criterion
  • Release Date: March 16 2004
  • Run Time: 283 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars 17 customer reviews
  • ASIN: B00019JR6I
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #83,372 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)
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Product Description

Product Description

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Ingmar Bergman's Scenes from a Marriage opens with a couple--Marianne (Liv Ullmann) and Johan (Erland Josephson)--being interviewed for a magazine. Every moment seems to teeter on the brink of some rupture; just as they start to get comfortable, the interviewer has them freeze for a photograph. After making some bland general statements, they both start admitting intimate details, confessing that they were brought together by mutual misery, then cheerfully claiming that theirs is a model marriage. The entirety of Scenes from a Marriage, which chronicles their emotional relationship even after their divorce and marriages to other people, continues to have these contradictory moments of honesty and self-deception, cruelty and kindness, concern and self-obsession--all laid bare by the skillful actors and the subtle, constantly shifting screenplay. Every scene is a small movie unto itself; in fact, Scenes from a Marriage was originally a six-episode TV show, which was carefully edited down into a unified film. This is one of Bergman's most immediate and accessible works, concerned more with the facts of human behavior than symbolism or abstract themes. Bergman understands how to balance what could be horrible pain and despair with the characters' earnest efforts to improve their lives. His imitators reduce everything to sheer suffering and alienation; Bergman sees the best in his characters, even when their actions are terrible. This 1973 film won numerous awards, including several acting honors for Ullmann. --Bret Fetzer --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: VHS Tape
Ingmar Bergman to me is one of cinema's most powerful directors. And, "Scenes From A Marriage" is the most powerful, and haunting film I've ever seen about love and marriage.
There's just something about Bergman's vision as a director and the camera of Sven Nykvist that brings this film to life. Bergman just throws these characters right into our faces, and we are truly mesmerize by them and their actions.
For those who have never seen this film, it is basically just as it's title may suggest, a look into the life of one couple's marriage. Marianne (Liv Ullman) and Johan (Erland Josephson) are our couple in question. They have been married for a while now, and seem to have a good solid marriage. One wouldn't think anything was wrong, especially when compared to their friends like Katarina (Bibi Andersson) and Peter (Jan Malmsjo) a couple whom act like their about to kill each other at any given moment. The scene is involving them, is one of many sterling moments in this masterpiece.
If I were to go on and talk about more scenes in this film, I would clearly be ruining the entire experience for you. Just rent this movie or even better buy this movie and be prepared to see the power that cinema can convey.
"Scenes From A Marriage" is one of Bergman's best films. And, while yes, there is talk of a sequel, I can only hope, that it all remains a rumor. To make a sequel out of this masterpiece would surely be a mistake. Here's a film that is perfect as it is. Just leave it alone and don't add anything to it. Though, Bergman did make a sequel out of the Katarina and Peter characters and made "From the Life of the Marionettes", which does have it's powerful moments, but doesn't quite build up to what this film has become.
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Format: VHS Tape
Ingmar Bergman's 1974 chamber-drama masterpiece was originally made as a six part mini-series for Swedish television--hence the divided tableau and emphasis on close-ups. Of course Bergman is the greatest purveyor of the close-up, and here he uses it to accentuate the psychological torment and strain that a marriage propagates on its victims (after this movie you'll view marriage as a war, if you already don't). Josephson and Ulmann shine as the dissenting couple, who first put up facades to deny the inevitable, eventually divorce, dive to relationship hell, and ultimately find a happy medium with a burgeoning love that could have never flourished if they stayed married. Interestingly, Bergman chooses to never show the couple's children (that would simply add another tumult to an already tumultuous puzzle). And, if it needs to be said, Sven Nykvist's photography is strikingly beautiful. "Scenes from a Marriage" suffers slightly from too much dialogue and being a bit lengthy--the poignancy is nullified after 170 minutes of relationship vicissitudes--but deserves to be cherished by any fan of "good" cinema or of Ingmar Bergman.
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Format: VHS Tape
This begins slowly as a stage play might and continues as an "interview" seen on television and then suddenly springs like a trap and we are immersed in a compelling drama about people with longings and frustrations often felt but seldom expressed. As Marianne (Liv Ullmann) and Johan (Erland Josephson) watch their friends expose the sordid details of their failed marriage, they are quietly smug that they are different; especially it is Marianne who is proper and conventional, always alert to the necessities of propriety, and is so happy that their marriage, while not perfect, will last. And so it appears.
And then we have the scene in which Johan tells her that he is in love with a younger woman. Her response is incredible tolerant and "understanding." She is generous and sad instead of wildly jealous. After a bit we see that this is a STRATEGY by Marianne. She is desperately trying to save her marriage. Even though she is faced with Johan's dull, almost absurdist indifference, she asks if she might help him pack his bags. This is a woman at thirty-five, when everything that means anything to her is suddenly threatened, and this is how she responds, with genius. Or, some might say, with madness. Marianne's tolerance of his behavior is stunning while Johan's insufferable arrogance and "worldly" understanding of himself makes us want to scream. Will her strategy work?
What Bergman does that keeps us engrossed for the 170 minutes this film runs (edited from a six-part production made for Swedish TV) is he tells the truth. It's a Bergman truth, but it is a truth so beyond the contrivances and superficialities of most movies that we are fascinated. In this we experience the deep, unsentimental fascination for people that Bergman is famous for.
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By Ian Gordon Malcomson HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on June 27 2012
Format: DVD
I know this series has been around for ages and has been fully critiqued by all and sundry in the movie industry and entertainment world. The frank discussion it generates on the subject of marriage and its many potential stress points may cause one to take a second look at the health of their own marital relationship. We see a seemingly successful couple - Johan and Mariane - engaging in a series of informal dialogues over the space of a number of months. Though the conversations start off rather innocently and casually over the marital discord building up in their friends' lives, it won't be long before the discussion turns to looking at theirs. What they slowly discover is that they have both been forced into marriage because of some unrealistic social expectations. Any sense of passionate attachment has become lost in the maze of domestic concerns that relate to careers, raising children, and socializing. During their marriage, neither Johan or Mariane really know each other. Sadly, that will become even more apparent as they painfully face the prospects of working through the tedious legal processes of separation and divorce, ironically, a subject that Mariane is well trained in as a family lawyer. Obviously, this couple, typical of middle-age people who grow tired of each other, have gradually come to the realization that they cannot articulate their true feelings to each other in a way that generates love and respect. This film strives to tear away the veneer of self-assurance that we often wrap ourselves in when we want to pretend that all is okay with ourselves and our partner. A relationship that does not share and deal with complex emotional needs on a continual basis is one that will invariably crumble in key areas like personal adequacy and sense of commitment.Read more ›
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