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Scholarship Reconsidered: Priorities of the Professoriate Paperback – Nov 28 1997

3.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Jossey-Bass; 1 edition (Nov. 28 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0787940690
  • ISBN-13: 978-0787940690
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 1.3 x 23.6 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 249 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #307,945 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

From the Inside Flap

"Throughout the country, educators and their critics are renewing the old debate over the faculty's preoccupation with research and its effects on the quality of teaching. On one campus after another, there are stirrings that seem to presage a willingness to think afresh about the criteria that determine tenure and measure the success of faculty careers. Scholarship Reconsidered speaks directly to these issues and should enrich a growing debate that may have important consequences for higher education."—Derek Bok, Harvard University" Scholarship Reconsidered is a thoughtful and welcome addition to a growing conversation about teaching and research in the nation's universities. That conversation too readily evokes a dichotomous relation between two activities, one entailing the production of new knowledge and the other the dissemination of the old. This report from the Carnegie Foundation will, I hope, begin the long task of dispelling this polarity."—Donald Kennedy, Stanford University" Scholarship Reconsidered will provide a vital contribution to improved undergraduate instruction through its recognition of the necessary contribution of ?scholarship teaching.' The report accurately describes the dependence of collegiate instruction on scholarship in a manner which appreciate the strengths of American higher education and shows how to use these strengths to improve it."—Ernst Benjamin, American Association of University Professors" Scholarship Reconsidered is wise and sensible, a welcome constellation of virtues. It will be a greatly influential guide to people who care about teaching and learning in the United States today."—Catherine R. Stimpson, RutgersIn this groundbreaking study, Ernest L. Boyer offers a new paradigm that recognizes the full range of scholarly activity by college and university faculty. He suggests that four general areas of Andeavor be viewed as scholarship: discovery, integration of knowledge, teaching, and serv

From the Back Cover

"Throughout the country, educators and their critics are renewing the old debate over the faculty?s preoccupation with research and its effects on the quality of teaching. On one campus after another, there are stirrings that seem to presage a willingness to think afresh about the criteria that determine tenure and measure the success of faculty careers. Scholarship Reconsidered speaks directly to these issues and should enrich a growing debate that may have important consequences for higher education."
—Derek Bok, Harvard University

"Scholarship Reconsidered is a thoughtful and welcome addition to a growing conversation about teaching and research in the nation?s universities. That conversation too readily evokes a dichotomous relation between two activities, one entailing the production of new knowledge and the other the dissemination of the old. This report from the Carnegie Foundation will, I hope, begin the long task of dispelling this polarity."
—Donald Kennedy, Stanford University

"Scholarship Reconsidered will provide a vital contribution to improved undergraduate instruction through its recognition of the necessary contribution of ?scholarship teaching.? The report accurately describes the dependence of collegiate instruction on scholarship in a manner which appreciate the strengths of American higher education and shows how to use these strengths to improve it."
—Ernst Benjamin, American Association of University Professors

"Scholarship Reconsidered is wise and sensible, a welcome constellation of virtues. It will be a greatly influential guide to people who care about teaching and learning in the United States today."
—Catherine R. Stimpson, Rutgers

In this groundbreaking study, Ernest L. Boyer offers a new paradigm that recognizes the full range of scholarly activity by college and university faculty. He suggests that four general areas of endeavor be viewed as scholarship: discovery, integration of knowledge, teaching, and service. Boyer questions the existence of a reward system that pushes faculty toward research and publication and away from teaching and proposes reconsidering the priorities of the professoriate.

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Format: Paperback
Ernest Boyer has presented a very thoughtful conception of the changing demands placed upon those faculty who work in higher education. Recognizing the triad which governs the "tenurability" of faculty, Boyer addresses the need to rethink what higher education is about and how the "professoriate" needs to re-examine and re-prioritze what is important--teaching! He argues eloquently for making teaching the object of research and research a basis for what is taught. The book should be required reading for all faculty and administrators who work in higher education and constantly struggle with tenure and promotion criteria. He presents a very different perspective on what is important, not only to the professors, but more importantly to the students and ultimately to society. His straight forward style and clear message makes the reading of the book a pleasure and his message can serve as a catalyst for serious discussion about what is important activity for professors to engage in as "educators" of our future leaders, scientists, business persons, teachers, lawyers, doctors, and other members of society.
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Format: Paperback
Dr.Boyer's Scholarship Reconsidered: Priorities of the Professoriate is one of the most famouse works about American education.Two years ago I read the book in China.By the way, I'm a Chinese graduate. And I think it is a usful book for those who are intersted in Ameican higer education.
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Format: Paperback
I'd have given the book a higher rating if the author can come up with a clear and appropriate solution to the problem. Imbalance between teaching and research in higher education institutions is not a new issue. There is little doubt that almost everyone can feel the pain: from administrators and faculty to students and parents. The problem is crystal clear, but it persists because we don't know or don't have the will to fix it. Let's face the reality: Universities build their reputation around research grants and publications and Nobel Prizes. Parents fight to get their children into these high profile universities. Students who graduate from these universities have a better chance to land a good job. In the process the "reputation" of these universities is further intensified. It's a vicious cycle not the administrators or the faculty alone can break. No one will say no to good teaching. The real problem is that reward for good teaching is less tangible, effects of good teaching are less immediate. It may take years before students appreciate good teaching, some time long after they've moved on. It may take generations before the society feels the effects of good teaching. Education is a society's long term investment. In a modern age where we ask for immediate recognition and fame, we lack the will to pursue a distant but more satisfying goal. All these problems cannot and should not be tackled by the administrators & faculty alone, as the book seems to suggest. These problems call on all of us to search deep in our soul what it really takes to move the society forward.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x9c8c3720) out of 5 stars 11 reviews
30 of 33 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9c73d9fc) out of 5 stars A must read for all higher education faculty April 28 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Ernest Boyer has presented a very thoughtful conception of the changing demands placed upon those faculty who work in higher education. Recognizing the triad which governs the "tenurability" of faculty, Boyer addresses the need to rethink what higher education is about and how the "professoriate" needs to re-examine and re-prioritze what is important--teaching! He argues eloquently for making teaching the object of research and research a basis for what is taught. The book should be required reading for all faculty and administrators who work in higher education and constantly struggle with tenure and promotion criteria. He presents a very different perspective on what is important, not only to the professors, but more importantly to the students and ultimately to society. His straight forward style and clear message makes the reading of the book a pleasure and his message can serve as a catalyst for serious discussion about what is important activity for professors to engage in as "educators" of our future leaders, scientists, business persons, teachers, lawyers, doctors, and other members of society.
23 of 30 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9c73de28) out of 5 stars An age-old problem without solution Aug. 26 2001
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I'd have given the book a higher rating if the author can come up with a clear and appropriate solution to the problem. Imbalance between teaching and research in higher education institutions is not a new issue. There is little doubt that almost everyone can feel the pain: from administrators and faculty to students and parents. The problem is crystal clear, but it persists because we don't know or don't have the will to fix it. Let's face the reality: Universities build their reputation around research grants and publications and Nobel Prizes. Parents fight to get their children into these high profile universities. Students who graduate from these universities have a better chance to land a good job. In the process the "reputation" of these universities is further intensified. It's a vicious cycle not the administrators or the faculty alone can break. No one will say no to good teaching. The real problem is that reward for good teaching is less tangible, effects of good teaching are less immediate. It may take years before students appreciate good teaching, some time long after they've moved on. It may take generations before the society feels the effects of good teaching. Education is a society's long term investment. In a modern age where we ask for immediate recognition and fame, we lack the will to pursue a distant but more satisfying goal. All these problems cannot and should not be tackled by the administrators & faculty alone, as the book seems to suggest. These problems call on all of us to search deep in our soul what it really takes to move the society forward.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9c73dda4) out of 5 stars Scholarship Reconsidered-A mandate for new scholars March 22 2006
By Kevin S. Dickenson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This text offered insights for anyone, currently involved in, or considering the academic profession. The authors do a wonderful job in decribing the current expectations of academia at the period this text was constructed. Unfortunately, the book does paint the picture many would expect. It is unfortunate that higher education may have strayed from the teaching mission whether intentionally or indirectly but the authors offer alternatives as to how to approach the situation and that it may not be as polarized as it may appear.

It would be insightful to see this study updated to reflect the current situation.

SD-(Kentucky)
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9c73dbb8) out of 5 stars If you want good teaching, reward it July 7 2013
By Jordan Bell - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
If you want something done well you have to give incentives for doing it well. If we assume that good teaching flows automatically from good research and thus reward resarch only, we will not get good teaching. "After all, it's futile to talk about improving the quality of teaching if, in the end, faculty are not given recognition for the time they spend with students."

Quoting a teaching assistant, "Teaching is considered secondary at best, with the implication being that those who aspire to teach or who enjoy it are not good scholars or intellects. The department gives double messages about teaching. It does not want to short-change the undergrads, but it is suspicious of those of us who care deeply about teaching." A problem that Boyer refers to in passing is that teaching assistants may have inadequate English skills; if a graduate student has such research ability that a department wants them, then let the department pay the student a stipend from faculty grants rather than giving undergraduates an incomprehensible teacher whose English skills are perhaps just adequate to copy notes from a sheet of paper to a blackboard. Teaching positions should not be sinecures for the training of researchers, and anyone who treats instruction this way ought to have no role in teaching undergraduates.

What use is research if people don't understand it, and thus can't either improve their understanding of the world from it or do things that are helpful with it? The truth will remain the truth whether we discover it or not, but if only a few dozen brilliant researchers understand something then it was probably not worth finding out. "The work of the professor becomes consequential only as it is understood by others." Digesting especially important advanced research is a significantly more useful use of time, for research itself, than most new research that is published. It would do more for mathematics, for example, to spend a career presenting the work of Bourgain in a comprehensible way, than all but the best original research that is done. In the language of this report, this is integration, which is poorly esteemed in academia now.

My only complaint about this report is that it presents itself as just posing suggestions and seems hopeful that we can have just as much research done while also improving teaching and service. But I cannot imagine how all that could be done at once. The report does not present any dilemmas that require making sacrifices in one area to get significant improvements in another.
HASH(0x9c73e090) out of 5 stars Five Stars Dec 16 2014
By Richard Burke - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A classic to be read by every scholar


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