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Season of the Serpent: Book One by [Nova, David]
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Season of the Serpent: Book One Kindle Edition

3.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Length: 340 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Product Description

Product Description

The Garden of Eden story is reimagined in this smart and satirical, contemporary fantasy ... The Wizard of Oz meets The Matrix ... a metaphysical thriller set in the last days of the Cold War.

The year is 1982. Paul Venturi is just an average, socially awkward college freshman hiding his extraterrestrial genesis in the closet, hoping to start a brand new life on campus. Unfortunately, his reemerging telepathy and the shadow of covert government surveillance make fitting in a daunting task. But when an enigmatic Serpent in the guise of a college stoner pressures him to smoke the forbidden weed, Paul is thrust into a mind-bending world of government cover-ups, Gnostic revelations, and dark conspiracies.

Catapulted over the rainbow, Paul lands in the Astral realm of Yin'Dru where competing factions of immortals are locked in a bitter cosmic stalemate waging their own secret Cold War over the destiny of the human race. A reluctant Paul is cast in the starring role of Adam - a higher sentient human groomed to become their celebrity-messiah. However, a sinister faction sees him as the perfect pawn to steer the United States and Soviet Union toward a nuclear Apocalypse.

Compelling and original, "Season of the Serpent" is a thought provoking, multi-layered mix of history, mythology, science fiction, and Synchronicity.
(Book One of Two)

About the Author

David Nova was born in Hawaii, went to school in Virginia, and has been an award winning freelance video editor in Washington DC for over 15 years. He has produced television programming and promotions for the National Geographic Channel and the Discovery Network. "Season of the Serpent" is David's first novel. For additional information about the book or the author, visit: www.davidnova.com.

Product Details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 790 KB
  • Print Length: 340 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0985307315
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: Advent Stream Publishing; 3rd edition (Dec 1 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0080RDHVO
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #526,336 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
I don't like giving other authors bad reviews, but rarely have I been so disappointed with a book. The prologue of this book should be struck silly with a hatchet. The entire thing should be trimmed, tightened, and then, just when it seems safe to breathe, someone should come in there with a blowtorch and just burn off the first ten pages. I can't come up with enough adjectives to truly hit on the sense of dismay I felt when I tried to get past this book's bulging, puffed-up, phony, silly, boring absurdity.

Pink Floyd, Wizard of Oz? World domination . . . pot, acid. Oh whatever. Really. I kept saying to myself, "Maybe I'm just having a bad day; maybe there's really something deep and intense and clever within this mess, this mayhem by manuscript?" Nah. It's really that bad. And you know what else? Drugs just aren't that funny anymore. That's so last century.

I wanted to give this one star because I found it such a trial to endure. But I suspect I'm just being petulant. So two stars it is.
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Format: Kindle Edition
Season of the Serpent is pretty much an acid trip. It starts reasonably normal and quite slowly as the author builds up Paul's character. He's just an ordinary guy going off to college, meeting another guy called Eric who turns out to be the Serpent and who tempts him into drugs. The story takes place during the cold war and details Paul's transformation from naive freshman to someone with a vastly different view of the universe. The marijuana expands his perception and awakens latent abilities nurtured by forgotten extra-terrestrial visitations throughout his life. These otherworld beings have plans for him.

The story is written from the point of view of an omniscient narrator, and between the chapters of Paul's exploits the narrator explains the truth about flying saucers, the politics behind the cold war and outlays a vision of a multi-universe. These sections use expositional prose and though they are interesting if you're interested in the subject matter, if you aren't, they probably feel somewhat laborious and longwinded.
As the story progresses, we come to realise that in Paul's world - supposedly our own - there are far deeper layers of existence than what we perceive. About half way through, the setting flips and Paul finds himself in a decadent realm of extra-terrestrials where he discovers that the earth is merely a simulation, a kind of game for the alien/gods. They are engaged in their own war, one that mirrors the two sides of the Cold War, and ultimately the battle between order and chaos.

The metaphysics were thought-provoking and, when Paul travels into mental worlds, visually interesting, especially at the end.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0xa32eeb64) out of 5 stars 33 reviews
30 of 33 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa329f2ac) out of 5 stars Fast paced metaphysical adventure May 21 2012
By eh - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a really great read. Its fast paced and thought provoking. I really liked the layers to both the storyline and the characters. The characters are three dimensional to the point where I remember cringing at the protagonist's college experience, which I can so identify with. Like any good mystery, the characters' intentions are complicated and shadowy which draws you in trying to calculate motives. It's a chess game, but you can't see the entire board or even all the pieces in play. I remember telling myself where is he going with this? It kept me guessing and its not predictable.

The storyline has a physical reality layer laced with U.S. history and a "metaphysical" plot layer superimposed over it which takes you on a journey into a strange new dimension.

I often have problems envisioning what I am reading, but the scenes are relayed to the reader with a very sophisticated level of description. This is a two book series, and the second book is at the top of my list when it's released.
21 of 23 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa329cc3c) out of 5 stars Imaginative and provocative: a truly engaging read Aug. 5 2012
By R.H. Ellison - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The story itself is compelling enough: college student Paul Venturi is just trying to maintain some semblance of an average life. It seems to be working - he's friendly, and bright, and happy-enough. He copes well enough with the isolating, off-kilter experience of being an introvert in an extrovert's world. But following a series of increasingly compelling coincidences and one memorable incident with a joint-seducing serpent, Paul's reality shifts to accomodate the astral dimensions of Yin'Dru, and we are helplessly sucked along for the ride. With an unforgettable cast of otherworld-characters, his twisting journey exposes answers to our most elusive questions. The complexities of Paul's childhood and his extraordinary sensitivity become retroactive clues as he rediscovers his true connection to a multiverse of galactic revelations and multidimensional power struggles.

Intelligently written and expertly paced, Season of the Serpent is a true multidisciplinary feat. Infused throughout are Nova's intimate understandings of history, psychology, physiology, and the energetic fields that compose our own Matrix. Pick your passion, and it's there: Yahweh and the Elohim; quantum physics and flying saucers; the fragile nature of a currency not backed by precious metals; the Freemasons and the mysteries of the Roswell UFO crash site. I could go on and on. He takes those subjects and phenomena that interest, confuse, and frighten us the most and presents us with a rearranged interconnectedness that shocks us because it inherently makes sense.

Author David Nova doesn't mince words; he doesn't spare readers the full-blown realism that keeps us tethered to Paul's experience. There's no safety net here. From Pink Floyd's "The Great Gig in the Sky" to Van Halen's "Running with the Devil", Nova even provides the soundtrack to accompany each rise, fall, and hover: a nod to the original juxtaposition of Hollywood on rock that helped to incite this string of events to begin with.

This book makes me restless. I want to share, to compare notes and - truth be told - scramble to find others just like it. Not since The Feast of Love by Charles Baxter (the book, not the movie) have I been moved to this end, and it's driving me crazy not to have a rooftop right now.

The story is compelling and beautifully written. Its ending left me wanting more, and I'm really looking forward to the next book. Highly recommended!
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa3284228) out of 5 stars pretty much an acid trip Nov. 5 2013
By Awesome Indies Reviews - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
Season of the Serpent is pretty much an acid trip. It starts reasonably normal and quite slowly as the author builds up Paul's character. He's just an ordinary guy going off to college, meeting another guy called Eric who turns out to be the Serpent and who tempts him into drugs. The story takes place during the cold war and details Paul's transformation from naive freshman to someone with a vastly different view of the universe. The marijuana expands his perception and awakens latent abilities nurtured by forgotten extra-terrestrial visitations throughout his life. These otherworld beings have plans for him.

The story is written from the point of view of an omniscient narrator, and between the chapters of Paul's exploits the narrator explains the truth about flying saucers, the politics behind the cold war and outlays a vision of a multi-universe. These sections use expositional prose and though they are interesting if you're interested in the subject matter, if you aren't, they probably feel somewhat laborious and longwinded.
As the story progresses, we come to realise that in Paul's world - supposedly our own - there are far deeper layers of existence than what we perceive. About half way through, the setting flips and Paul finds himself in a decadent realm of extra-terrestrials where he discovers that the earth is merely a simulation, a kind of game for the alien/gods. They are engaged in their own war, one that mirrors the two sides of the Cold War, and ultimately the battle between order and chaos.

The metaphysics were thought-provoking and, when Paul travels into mental worlds, visually interesting, especially at the end. The vision is of a hierarchical multiverse where a nuclear explosion on earth would also irreparably damage the other less physical realms, so everyone has a vested interest in stopping the bomb. Synchronicity is a reoccurring theme and the story links events in the extraterrestrial realm to events in the history of the time in our world.

There's a lot of interesting ideas in this book, including one way of viewing the Christian story of Adam and Eve and the tree of knowledge, as well as some parallels with Alice in Wonderland. Even if you can't quite follow the details you get a sense of a reality much vaster and more complex than we presently perceive, and as in all good metaphysical fiction, the ideas are integral to the story's structure.
The characterisation was adequate, but I would have liked to have seen a bit more strength in Paul's character and a clearer sense of the Serpent's - though it is probably appropriate that he remained somewhat slippery.

I felt that the long prologue was unnecessary, and quite likely off-putting for some due to it's apparent lack of point and less than engaging writing. I think it would have been better as an appendix, a kind of optional extra.

Though it has some lovely phrases and the author clearly has great potential, the prose would be much more engaging had the author shown the story rather than told it. As it is, much of the first half lacks immediacy so it doesn't draw the reader in as it should. In general, the ideas were well expressed--mind you, I am used to such concepts--but I feel the plot became somewhat confused and a little repetitive after Paul arrived in the extraterrestrial realm and before his 'testing'. I suspect that this is largely because I found the strange names hard to remember and differentiate. The end is unexpected. It leaves me wanting to read the next installment. I am interested to see where the author could go from there.

I recommend it for old hippies interested in physics or metaphysics, particularly those pertaining to the nature of the universe. I particularly liked this description of the physical universe: "a perpetual unfolding, multidimensional manifestation of living consciousness."

I give it 4 stars for the purpose of general readership, but I can't recommend it for inclusion in the Awesome Indies list due to the book primarily telling the story rather than showing it, at least in the first half of the book.

AIA Reviewers
10 of 13 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa3049564) out of 5 stars Locked Potential Nov. 5 2013
By Brent J. Meske - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
What is ironic here is that every review about this book is absolutely correct. The five star reviews point out that this book is fast-paced, that the ideas are interesting and compelling, that the writing is crafty and full of intriguing images. That's all true, to a point. The one star reviews generally couldn't get past the first few chapters because the writing was boring, it was paced slowly, and the reviewers wondered what the devil the other reviewers were smoking. This is also true.

To understand this insane duality, it's necessary to understand the dual nature of conflict in the world (of writing in particular). We generally have two opposing types:

To Show: when the narrative, dialogue, and description serves the purpose of involving the reader so that the personalities, plot points, back story, and foreshadowed events are introduced without slowing the pace the writer sets. Instead of a character being described as sarcastic, we learn this through several sarcastic lines of dialogue. If the villain engages in subtle manipulation, said manipulation happens as the story unfolds, rather than stating outright in the character description: he was subtle at the nefarious art of manipulation.

To Tell: a rushed and half-hearted attempt to shove the reader into the story without including the reader along the way. This gives he feeling of a documentary, a summary, or a Cliff's Notes. A lot of times this is done in order to impart a lot of backstory all at once, as is the case of early chapters of Season of the Serpent. Telling also takes place in order to rush through the scenes or events that might be considered less important to see unfolding, but still important to know.

Both of these uses of Telling serve to slow the pace of the book, especially the first seven chapters, to a standstill. (this is where the one star reviewers got held up... and I almost did as well). Couple this with an infuriating presumption on the part of the book's Foreword: namely, informing readers what they do and don't care about, effectively kills all motivation to read past chapter five.

Nothing interesting is happening, and the interesting stuff is happening offstage. We're not Shown interesting scenes where aliens crash land, or about Paul's weird upbringing. And by this point, it's difficult to care. Only fans of the genre (the five star reviewers) are moving beyond chapter 7-10, when Tell begins its slow bleed into pure Show.

The worst part about this is the 25 page rule: an author must prove the book worthy within the sample limit. The e-book industry is so oversaturated that a book simply cannot afford a slow, uninteresting start.

The good news is that the author shows considerable promise as a writer. Once the action begins, around chapter seven or eight, the pace picks up, and the Telling sections of the book are shorter, spaced further apart. While not a 'page turner' or 'fast-paced', books are not required to be so, and the languid unfurling of Paul's revelations is handled well. By the end, I was definitely hooked. Parts 4-5 were almost pure Show (except for the descriptions of the various Directors' job descriptions, and were those really necessary? Nah, it actually served to insult my intelligence a bit).

Furthermore, SOTSerpent shows a number of places where the language is used skillfully and passionately. Turns of phrase, metaphors and images are well-written. A favorite passage was one in which the author describes the cyclical nature of the bureaucratic-military machine, in which everyone is working in a compartmentalized towards an unknown goal.

The basis for the book, the synchronicity of events, music, books, and the curious relationship between aliens and popular mythology is sufficient to propel the book forward and keep the reader guessing.

By the end of the book, I was actually racing through the clicks, to find out what new weird revelation was going to befall the hero, and the politics of the otherworld were skillfully conceived of. I might read Book Two, because Book One ends at a cliff-hanger.

For fans of the genre, go for it. However, this book could use a serious edit by a competent, industry-familiar editor before I would recommend 3 stars (sale-worthiness), or even higher (this book has that potential). It misses 3 stars by a hair, because of some cliched phrases.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa32944ec) out of 5 stars Almost afraid to read Book II Oct. 30 2013
By michael recchione - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book tackles just about the biggest subject possible, and does it with humor, excitement,complexity, engaging characters, fantastic, sensual descriptions of inner space,...

The set-up and development in Book I is fantastic - I couldn't put it down. Just finished the first book, and I'm just about to buy the second book. I'm anxious to see if the author lives up to the promise of this book, at the same time expecting that he won't. Not because he isn't good (the book is really well written, character development is great, the twists and turns of the plot are spell-binding,...) But because he can't. How do you take on the secret of life, the universe and everything without eventually having to cop out and say it's 42? On the other hand, maybe that's not a cop-out at all. Maybe the answer really is 42.

I'm about to plunk down $2.99 of my hard-earned cash to find out...