• List Price: CDN$ 130.95
  • You Save: CDN$ 29.03 (22%)
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Sensemaking in Organizati... has been added to your Cart
+ CDN$ 6.49 shipping
Used: Acceptable | Details
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Visibly worn from excessive use but readable copy. May be an ex-library copy and may not include CD and/or Accessories.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Sensemaking in Organizations Paperback – May 31 1995

4.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
CDN$ 706.94
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 101.92
CDN$ 87.22 CDN$ 64.85

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • You'll save an extra 5% on Books purchased from Amazon.ca, now through July 29th. No code necessary, discount applied at checkout. Here's how (restrictions apply)

No Kindle device required. Download one of the Free Kindle apps to start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, and computer.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product Details

  • Paperback: 248 pages
  • Publisher: Sage Publications; 1 edition (May 31 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 080397177X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0803971776
  • Product Dimensions: 1.9 x 15.9 x 23.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 386 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #287,054 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  •  Would you like to update product info, give feedback on images, or tell us about a lower price?

  • See Complete Table of Contents

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This book has a very academic tone but it has some powerful implications for anyone in business. The book makes a number of points that are not intuitive but that are very powerful. For example, he talks about the advantages of speed, confidence, and plausibility in problem solving and why they may be more important than accuracy
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Weick's book is thoroughly researched, drawing its insights from psychological and organisational studies.
It offers new views on how organisations operate, and how they generate meaning. It points out that reality is not something outside the organisation, but something that is constructed by people within the organisation - an empowering insight. Weick also extensively discusses where and how this 'making of sense' happens.
But the book fails largely in linking this theory to practice. After making sense of 'Sensemaking', (which requires some mental acrobatics!), I still don't know how a leader can influence the sensemaking process to the benefit of the organisation. I'm still left with the basic question: So what?
2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0xa67198c4) out of 5 stars 8 reviews
29 of 30 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa68219fc) out of 5 stars The Story of Sensemaking Sept. 29 2013
By William A. Reed - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This review is different than most, because rather than dissecting the book, I will provide a few overall ideas about the concept of Sensemaking and why it is worth your consideration. This is an academic and theoretical book, but the more casual reader should not miss out on its core principles. For an academic treatment of Sensemaking, see pages 57-64 of my dissertation which is available on my website.

Sensemaking is a process that applies to both individuals and groups who are faced with new information that is inconsistent with their prior beliefs. In some cases, it can be the lack of expected information that triggers the Sensemaking process. Weick's work is based in part on Festinger's theory of cognitive dissonance, which holds that people are uncomfortable with inconsistent beliefs and are driven resolve the dissonance it creates.

Consequently, Sensemaking posits that people will resolve their cognitive dissonance through plausible (but not necessarily accurate) narratives, which then become entrenched over time and resistant to change. This explains how, for example, religious groups can have such stringent beliefs, how political parties can be confident in their diametrically opposed positions, how organizations can develop very different cultures, and how individuals can develop very different interpretations for the same events.

Underlying assumptions in Sensemaking:

1) The world is complex and ambiguous
2) Available information is massive and contradictory
3) Individuals have limited ability to process information
4) Individuals are uncomfortable with unresolved ambiguity or contradictory information (cognitive dissonance)
5) Most actions, beliefs, and cognitions are socially influenced

The Sensemaking process:

1) Sensemaking starts with an event or act (or sometimes the lack of an expected event).

2) Individuals construct meaning for the event or act (interpret it) by selecting only certain cues from their past experience based on their existing beliefs and biases. Disconfirming cues are often not observed at all, deemphasized, or ignored.

3) Commitment forms around the interpretation to bind the interpretation to future action. When publicly communicated, commitment is especially strong.

4) Individuals are motivated to justify their commitments, so they initiate future actions and continually refine their interpretation of the original event so that their commitment to a course of action is deemed appropriate.

5) These new actions produce "evidence" that validates the interpretation and are used to increase decision confidence.

6) Over time, the ambiguous nature of the original event or act is forgotten and other possible "right answers" are never developed. More importantly, the commitment that was made to a specific decision or course of action increasingly becomes seen as the only rational, logical, and appropriate outcome.

For a more business-friendly, but still challenging book, which includes numerous examples, please consider Weick's "Making Sense of the Organization".Making Sense of the Organization (KeyWorks in Cultural Studies)

If you found this review helpful please click "Yes".
35 of 50 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa69e5b10) out of 5 stars Powerful insight into how people work together Aug. 19 1997
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book has a very academic tone but it has some powerful implications for anyone in business. The book makes a number of points that are not intuitive but that are very powerful. For example, he talks about the advantages of speed, confidence, and plausibility in problem solving and why they may be more important than accuracy
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa6e3e294) out of 5 stars Great review of what works in organizations Feb. 3 2012
By Dr. Jones - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book attempts to illustrate how organizations come to shape the behavior of their members. Weick argues that it rests in the fact that the organization comes to form the mental frame through which members are socialized as they are brought into the organization. Some aspects of the organization will be undefined ,change, or held back from the new member. The member is then forced to attempt to discern what they should do from multiple sources of information within the organization. Weick lays out how this process might look like. All in all, an important book on organization theory.
HASH(0xa639e8b8) out of 5 stars Making of sense Sept. 16 2013
By Sussan MALIMA - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a very difficult book to read but very intersting and revelas a lot of things that one could not understand in any setting.It is a book that could be recomende to relirgious leaders, politicians,managers and leaders across all sectors
31 of 48 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa639e474) out of 5 stars Sensemaking fails to translate theory into practice June 25 2001
By M Smit - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Weick's book is thoroughly researched, drawing its insights from psychological and organisational studies.
It offers new views on how organisations operate, and how they generate meaning. It points out that reality is not something outside the organisation, but something that is constructed by people within the organisation - an empowering insight. Weick also extensively discusses where and how this 'making of sense' happens.
But the book fails largely in linking this theory to practice. After making sense of 'Sensemaking', (which requires some mental acrobatics!), I still don't know how a leader can influence the sensemaking process to the benefit of the organisation. I'm still left with the basic question: So what?


Feedback