Buy Used
CDN$ 2.19
+ CDN$ 6.49 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Sold by wobcanada
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: The book has been read but remains in clean condition. All pages are intact and the cover is intact. Some minor wear to the spine.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Seven Altars of Dusarra Paperback – May 21 1987

5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, May 21 1987
CDN$ 2.18

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.
click to open popover

No Kindle device required. Download one of the Free Kindle apps to start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, and computer.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Grafton (May 21 1987)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0586071504
  • ISBN-13: 978-0586071502
  • Product Dimensions: 17.4 x 11.2 x 2.2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 159 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
  •  Would you like to update product info, give feedback on images, or tell us about a lower price?

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is the second of four books in the "Lords of Dus" series. A very under-appreciated fantasy series, in my opinion. While these books are neither as intricate nor as well written as many of the big names in fantasy, ("Lord of the Rings" for example) they are well thought out and very original stories with very memorable characters. Entertaining enough to be read several times, but straight-forward enough to be a reasonably quick read.
In this book, the main character, Garth the overman, is sent by the Forgotten King to steal whatever he finds on each of the Seven Altars of the Dark Gods in the city of Dusarra.
If you've never read the other books in this series, I recommend that you pick up "Lure of the Basilisk" first. But if you've read that one already, then I definitely recommend that you pick up this one as well. I consider this to be the best book in the series because it has a very straight forward story, but it is handled extremely well and moves at just the right pace. This book is never boring for a second.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0xa6b005a0) out of 5 stars 7 reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa69fcf18) out of 5 stars The best book in an underrated series April 3 2000
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is the second of four books in the "Lords of Dus" series. A very under-appreciated fantasy series, in my opinion. While these books are neither as intricate nor as well written as many of the big names in fantasy, ("Lord of the Rings" for example) they are well thought out and very original stories with very memorable characters. Entertaining enough to be read several times, but straight-forward enough to be a reasonably quick read.
In this book, the main character, Garth the overman, is sent by the Forgotten King to steal whatever he finds on each of the Seven Altars of the Dark Gods in the city of Dusarra.
If you've never read the other books in this series, I recommend that you pick up "Lure of the Basilisk" first. But if you've read that one already, then I definitely recommend that you pick up this one as well. I consider this to be the best book in the series because it has a very straight forward story, but it is handled extremely well and moves at just the right pace. This book is never boring for a second.
HASH(0xa6a00414) out of 5 stars Intriguing and masterfully done Jan. 5 2016
By The Reviewer Formerly Known as Kurt Johnson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Returning to the crumbling city of Skelleth, Garth the overman finds himself returning to the service of the Forgotten King. He is sent off to Dusarra, the city of the Dark Gods, to steal whatever lies on the altars of the seven gods of the city. But before long, Garth realizes that there is more to human religion than he thought. The age of the god of decay is coming to a close, and the time of the god of destruction awaits the coming of a mortal who will seize the god’s sword and begin the Age of Destruction. Is Garth this new servant of destruction, and does he have a choice in the matter?

For many years now, I have been a great fan of Lawrence Watt-Evans’ wonderful Ethshar series. Having finished all of the Ethshar books currently available, I moved on to his Lords of Dus series, and must say that I am quite happy! This book makes an excellent sequel to The Lure of the Basilisk, and is every bit as good as that one. This is a great fantasy story, complete with magic, strange creatures, and lots of swordplay. In particular, I found the author’s use of a non-human as the protagonist to be quite intriguing and masterfully done.

So, if you are a fan of fantasy literature, then you must get this book. You will not be disappointed.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa6a00438) out of 5 stars On the Road Again Jan. 26 2005
By Marc Ruby™ - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Garth the Overman and Korg the trusty warbeast are back in Skelleth, this time to try to establish a trade mission that could be of great importance to the inhabitants of the Northern Waste. Initially Korg and some of his relatives have great success, but Korg once again has a run in with the Baron of Skelleth. After their last conflict the Baron would like nothing better than Garth's head, but seeing some opportunity, he instead insists that Garth swear fealty in return for trading rights. Anyone who knpws overmen will tell you that isn't going to work. Garth, furious at the Baron's impertinence, sits down with the King in Yellow again and hammers out a deal.

The King wants whatever Garth finds on the seven altars of Dussara and promises that carrying out that task will give Garth what he wants in Skelleth in the process. Even Garth has figured out that deals with the King in Yellow always have a hitch to them - and proceeds cautiously. This time the trip is less harrowing with only one village on that way, one with an annoying prophecy. Soon Garth is in the night city of Dusarra, planning his thefts.

Seven alters with gems, potential victims and, yes, even dust, are all that lie between Garth and victory over the Baron of Skelleth. For Garth, who has teetered on the edge of crisis since leaving the northern wastes, they are seven opportunities for disaster and there is more than a little question about whether either Garth of Dusarra will survive.

This is the second volume is a series that will eventually be referred to as 'The Lords of Dus.' Watt-Evans shows a surer footing in this telling about the Prince of a magically created people who have been exiled for 350 years to the northern wastes. Garth wants to make a difference in his world, but it not entirely clear on how to go about it. His adventures in the first volume lead him to return to the world below and Watt-Evans has created a second, light-hearted, story that under line the problems that can occur when cultures clash in unexpected places.

Watt-Evan's writes well, although he tends to over engineer his action, and relies too much on descriptive passages to fill out his book. Since The Seven Altars of Dusarra is short, it never really bogs down. But every once in a while there is a hitch, as when the author spends too much time describing which hand he moves what object too while trying to do two things at once. Don't let that put you off though, this is a classic series, which is mostly for fun and the intriguing device of having an 'alien' creature as a main character. This is classic fantasy, with a twist.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa6a00750) out of 5 stars Altar Pieces April 24 2013
By Arthur W Jordin - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The Seven Altars of Dusarra (1981) is the second Fantasy novel in the Lords of Dus series, following The Lure of the Basilisk. In the previous volume,Garth went to consult the Wise Women of Ordunin.

He was tired of death and dying. He wanted to gain a reputation that would be known as long as anything lived. The oracle sent him to Skelleth to meet with the Forgotten King.

Being a practical person -- like all overmen -- Garth prepared for the long journey. He rode a great black warbeast, derived from cat, dog, and donkey ancestors. It had been given to him in lieu of tribute by the overmen of Kirpa.

The warbeast had such wide paws that it walked on the surface of mud and snow. It carried him rapidly across the frozen ground to the village of Skelleth. The town had been an outpost of the Empire, but had gone downhill after the conflict ended. The wall had fallen many places and the gates were permanently open.

Garth rode through the North Gate without encountering any guards. He continued though the town to the King's Inn. There he found an old man and asked him if he is the Forgotten King. When the man indicated in the affirmative, Garth sat down and told his story.

In this novel, Garth is an overman. He is a humanoid taller and stronger than a man. He is the Prince of Ordunin -- a port city in the far north -- and Lord of the Overmen of the Northern Waste.

The Forgotten King is an immortal man from long ago. He lives in the King's Inn within the village of Skelleth.

Saram is a former Lieutenant in the guard of the Baron of Skelleth. He had been discharged from the guard for insubordination.

Herrenmer is the Captain of the guard of the Baron of Skelleth. He has prior troubles with Garth.

Koros is Garth's warbeast. He is a mixture of the breeds of cat, dog and donkey. The warbeast is as tall as a large human.

In this story, three months later, Garth comes back to Skelleth with three companions. They enter in the night and set up the trading goods on the town square. Despite their fear of Overmen, the villagers are soon trading for the furs and carved ivory.

The Forgotten King sends Saram to fetch Garth. So Garth walks to the King's Inn and tells the Forgotten King that he wants nothing to do with him. Despite his reluctance, the Forgotten King makes an unappealing offer for further services.

Later the Baron's guards open his front door. Herrenmer sets a guard on each side of the door and then notices the overmen. He goes over to ask Garth why he has returned,

The baron agrees to let the overmen trade with his villagers if Garth will swear fealty to him. Garth is very angry, but vows to present the offer to his City Council after returning to Ordunin, Then he returns to the King's Inn and accepts the task proposed by the Forgotten King.

Garth rides his warbeast toward Dusarra. He is diverted from his planned path in the village of Weideth by an illusion. Garth notices the diversion and walks back to the town. Detecting the illusion, he has a talk with the village seer and elders.

Reaching Dusarra, Garth finds the populace busily shopping in the dark. He finds an inn and talks to a female server. She tells him that the town worships seven dark gods.

Garth follows the server to her temple and finds the entrance way totally dark. The temple itself is somewhat lit by holes in the dome in the semblance of the stars overhead. Garth sits through three worship services, struggling to stay awake.

This tale presents Garth with the task of stealing whatever lies on each of the seven altars. The priests resist his efforts and he has to kill a few. Yet he doesn't like killing people.

That is a major reason why he dislikes performing tasks for the Forgotten King. He had to kill many people in the previous task. Now the killings are happening again.

Garth realizes that he is acting unwisely in Dusarra. He feels that he is so angry that he is committing mistakes. Yet he is acting so openly that few suspect him of committing the thefts and murders.

Garth steals one thing after another from the altars. The next installment in this sequence is The Sword of Bheleu.

Highly recommended for Watt-Evans fans and for anyone else who enjoys tales of strange gods, simple tactics, and unforeseen results. Read and enjoy!

-Arthur W. Jordin
HASH(0xa6a0087c) out of 5 stars Five Stars Aug. 19 2014
By daniel arevalo rodil - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The setting where this adventure takes place is very rich and the plot dwelves deep into into it

Look for similar items by category


Feedback