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Sex and the City Paperback – Sep 1 1997

2.9 out of 5 stars 134 customer reviews

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Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Grand Central Publishing; 1 edition (Sept. 1 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0446673544
  • ISBN-13: 978-0446673549
  • Product Dimensions: 13.5 x 1.9 x 20.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 358 g
  • Average Customer Review: 2.9 out of 5 stars 134 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #461,050 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

From Amazon

The "Sex and the City" columnist for the New York Observer documents the social scene of modern-day Manhattan. The reader gets an introduction to "Modelizers," the men who only have eyes for models, as well as a more common species, the "Toxic Bachelor." Reading like a society novel gone downtown and askew, Sex and the City is a comically sordid look at status and ambition and the many characters consumed by the sexual politics of the '90s. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

"We're leading sensory saturated lives," announces jetsetting photographer and playboy Peter Beard in a roundtable discussion of menages a trois, setting the tone of opulent debasement that suffuses this collection of Bushnell's punchy, archly knowing and sharply observed sex columns from the New York Observer. Prowling the modish clubs, party circuit and weekend getaways of rich and trendy New York society (most of whose denizens are identified by pseudonyms), Bushnell offers a brash, radically unromantic perspective. She visits a sex club and dates a Bicycle Boy ("the literary romantic subspecies" whose patron saints are George Plimpton and Murray Kempton). But in most chapters she keeps to the sidelines, deploying instead her alter-ego Carrie (like the author, a blonde writer from Connecticut in her mid-30s), whose sweet if feckless romance with Mr. Big?a nondescript power player?serves as a foil for the hilarious, unsentimentalized misadventures of her peers. These include model-chasers like Barkley, 25, a painter with the face of a Botticelli angel whose parents pay for his SoHo junior loft, and Tom Peri, the "emotional Mayflower," who ferries newly dumped women to higher emotional ground and is then invariably dumped. The effect is that of an Armistead Maupin-like canvas tinged with a liberal smattering of Judith Krantz. Collected in one volume, Bushnell's characters grow generic, but in small doses these essays are brain candy that will appeal equally to urban romantics and anti-romantics.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
I forgot how one-dimensional, impressionistic and sketchy this book really is. No plot. No character development. Fake "interviews" with people about threesomes, bicycle boys and sex clubs. Evidently started as a column? Makes Tales of the City, which started the same way, read like Trollope. There is a rule that bad books make great TV or film, and while the series was nothing of lasting value, with the films destroying whatever relevance it might have had, this is an example of that rule. May be good for people that have never lived in LA or NYC? For those that have it does not hold up. Also: if you have ever read classic fiction, this is not something I would suggest. There are other things that can entertain and elevate without leaving that sour fin de siècle taste of existential ennui and nausea this evokes. Or, was it meant to be that all along? If so, disregard the above and enjoy the dive into the sickly, shallow end of the pool.
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Format: Paperback
Articles made short & sweet (or sour), quirky interest every week written by a columnist for the New York Observer. These in turn were collected & became a book sold in the women's cultural study, non-fiction section of the bookstore. One can see where the characters for the TV show were created but Sex & the City is not a novel, no thought out flowing plot, only the weekly articles Bushnell created for the amusement of New Yorkers about the how the other half lives. It's not that raunchy, not that pretty, it's pretty sad actually (for the people she writes about). The style is that of a columnist not a novelist, so don't expect the TV show only the basic elements for the show lie hidden within...
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Format: Paperback
Look. Seriously, now. If you like the show or the book even a little bit, you realllllly need to investigate books by Cynthia Heimel. Heimel was the original and she remains the best. She's smarter and funnier and a thousand times more interesting than Candace Bushnell or Carrie Bradshaw. Heimel is a little grittier than SATC. She's weak for shoes and designer clothes but she lives strictly in the real world. Please, please PLEASE read "Sex Tip For Girls" or "But Enough About You" or "If You Can't Live Without Me, Why Aren't You Dead Yet" if you want to see what Candace Bushnell is DESPERATELY TRYING to do! Try Heimel once. You'll never read Bushnell again. You're welcome!
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Format: Paperback
Despite the several warnings in reviews here about confusing the book with the HBO series, it's easy to confuse the two. After all, the typeface and star of the series is featured on the book's cover. Be aware, though, that the book is nothing like the series. The tone, like Bushnell's other fiction, is bitter and empty. The female characters have shallow lives--they are desperate to get or keep their looks, status, or money by any means possible. The friendships which are fundamental to the series are not part of this world. The male characters are no more interesting or realistic. Bushnell can write, but her characters are unrecognizable to me (thank God!) and her cynical point of view makes you feel sorry for her rather than feeling a connection.
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Format: Paperback
Articles made short & sweet (or sour), quirky interest every week written by a columnist for the New York Observer. These in turn were collected & became a book sold in the women's cultural study, non-fiction section of the bookstore. One can see where the characters for the TV show were created but Sex & the City is not a novel, no thought out flowing plot, only the weekly articles Bushnell created for the amusement of New Yorkers about the how the other half lives. It's not that raunchy, not that pretty, it's pretty sad actually (for the people she writes about). The style is that of a columnist not a novelist, so don't expect the TV show only the basic elements for the show lie hidden within…
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What a letdown this book turned out to be! It bears almost no resemblance to the TV series which I love so much. The writing is rambling and confusing, and the characters are very shallow and superficial--totally lacking in warmth, humanity, and credibility. The script writers were geniuses to make the TV series as good as it was, since Candace Bushnell gave them so little material to work with. Putting SJP on the cover as Carrie is deceptive advertising as far as I'm concerned.
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Format: Paperback
Bushnell has been hyped as "Edith Wharton with a Martini". If anyone actually believes this, then I am horrified at how low American literature has sunk. She's not even Jacqueline Suzann or Jackie Collins. These little vignettes are superficial, dull, and neither particularly intelligent nor particularly witty. Other reviewers are correct when they point out that the series was much smarter and funnier (at least, the first three seasons, anyway). It amazes me that this crap ever got published, and now Bushnell fancies herself a clever writer, so she has begun foisting other bombs on us as well (Trading Up and Four Blondes, both as dull and unimaginative as Sex and the City). She is an amateurish writer with painfully sophomoric "insights" who has benefitted from the hype of a great show based very loosely on her column (and I mean VERY loosely). As someone who lives in NYC, I can tell you that the people Bushnell reveres as the power players and "in" crowd are the (...) of many a joke in other social circles. Not everyone in this city worships superficiality and eternal adolescence. Don't waste your money!!
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