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Does Socrates Have a Method? Rethinking the Elenchus in Plato's Dialogues and Beyond Paperback – Dec 31 2002


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 327 pages
  • Publisher: Penn State University Press (Dec 31 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0271023473
  • ISBN-13: 978-0271023472
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 2.5 x 22.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 476 g
  • Average Customer Review: Be the first to review this item
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #3,350,633 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Review

"This is a valuable tome--a collection of essays from both old lags and young scholars, with widely differing approaches to ancient philosophy, on an important topic in Socratic studies."

"Despite their variations in topic and approach, the essays are uniformly excellent."

--D.H. Calhoun, Choice

"Scott's anthology recognizes both the critical attention that Vlastos's interpretation received and his powerful impact on how certain issues of Socratic method have been discussed, and continue to be discussed, by Plato scholars. . . . As Scott notes, there is a deliberate effort by most contributors to break with the tradition, and rethink old assumptions about the Socratic method associated with Vlastos's model. The current lack of consensus between scholars seems to be a desirable effect because it expands and stimulates discussion, especially about what terms one ought to use in talking about Socratic method."--Rebecca Bensen, Journal of the History of Philosophy

"Despite their variations in topic and approach, the essays are uniformly excellent."--D.H. Calhoun, Choice

"This book puts philosophers and classicists who disagree over methodology in Platonic scholarship in direct 'conversation' with one another in a single volume. That makes this collection of essays attractive to a broad range of scholars, regardless of where they might place themselves on the issue. It has the further virtue of focusing on a single issue."--Jill Gordon, Colby College

"The fact that each interpreter is able to lend insight into one or another dimension of Platonic thinking without ever establishing anything like a definitive account of the Socratic method speaks well of both the genius of Plato and the construction of this collection of essays."--Christopher P. Long, Review of Metaphysics

"Although Gregory Vlastos seemed to have framed the terms for all discussions of Socrates, this volume by Gary Alan Scott shows how many questions remain unanswered. It recuperates the initial power of Socratic questioning, endlessly rebellious to all scholarship."--Michel Narcy, Directeur de recherche CNRS, Co-directeur de "Philosophie antique"

"The result is a refreshing change of focus that challenges commonly held assumptions about Socrates' method of question and answer. . . . The authors of the collected essays have succeeded admirably in reexamining a notion that most Platonic (and non-Platonic) scholars blithely employ and in emphasizing some hitherto unexplored aspects of the Socratic elenchos, thereby deepening our understanding of its nature and function."--Zina Giannopoulou, Ancient Philosophy

Scott s anthology recognizes both the critical attention that Vlastos s interpretation received and his powerful impact on how certain issues of Socratic method have been discussed, and continue to be discussed, by Plato scholars.... As Scott notes, there is a deliberate effort by most contributors to break with the tradition, and rethink old assumptions about the Socratic method associated with Vlastos s model. The current lack of consensus between scholars seems to be a desirable effect because it expands and stimulates discussion, especially about what terms one ought to use in talking about Socratic method. Rebecca Bensen, Journal of the History of Philosophy"

Despite their variations in topic and approach, the essays are uniformly excellent. D.H. Calhoun, Choice"

This book puts philosophers and classicists who disagree over methodology in Platonic scholarship in direct conversation with one another in a single volume. That makes this collection of essays attractive to a broad range of scholars, regardless of where they might place themselves on the issue. It has the further virtue of focusing on a single issue. Jill Gordon, Colby College"

The fact that each interpreter is able to lend insight into one or another dimension of Platonic thinking without ever establishing anything like a definitive account of the Socratic method speaks well of both the genius of Plato and the construction of this collection of essays. Christopher P. Long, Review of Metaphysics"

Although Gregory Vlastos seemed to have framed the terms for all discussions of Socrates, this volume by Gary Alan Scott shows how many questions remain unanswered. It recuperates the initial power of Socratic questioning, endlessly rebellious to all scholarship. Michel Narcy, Directeur de recherche CNRS, Co-directeur de "Philosophie antique"

The result is a refreshing change of focus that challenges commonly held assumptions about Socrates method of question and answer. . . . The authors of the collected essays have succeeded admirably in reexamining a notion that most Platonic (and non-Platonic) scholars blithely employ and in emphasizing some hitherto unexplored aspects of the Socratic elenchos, thereby deepening our understanding of its nature and function. Zina Giannopoulou, Ancient Philosophy"

Despite their variations in topic and approach, the essays are uniformly excellent.

D.H. Calhoun, Choice"

"This is a valuable tome--a collection of essays from both old lags and young scholars, with widely differing approaches to ancient philosophy, on an important topic in Socratic studies. You can play with the book's title to bring out different emphases, each relevant to a few of the articles in the book: Does Socrates have a method?

I enjoyed this book, while finding plenty to disagree with in many of the papers. Since the writers come from different directions, any scholar will also find plenty to disagree with -- but of course such disagreement helps to test one's own cherished opinions and attitudes. And so this volume dedicated to the Socratic elenchus will act elenchtically on its readers."

--Robin Waterfield, Bryn Mawr Classical Review (BMCR)

"This book puts philosophers and classicists who disagree over methodology in Platonic scholarship in direct 'conversation' with one another in a single volume. That makes this collection of essays attractive to a broad range of scholars, regardless of where they might place themselves on the issue. It has the further virtue of focusing on a single issue."

--Jill Gordon, Colby College

"Although Gregory Vlastos seemed to have framed the terms for all discussions of Socrates, this volume by Gary Alan Scott shows how many questions remain unanswered. It recuperates the initial power of Socratic questioning, endlessly rebellious to all scholarship."

--Michel Narcy, Directeur de recherche CNRS, Co-directeur de "Philosophie antique"

"Scott's anthology recognizes both the critical attention that Vlastos's interpretation received and his powerful impact on how certain issues of Socratic method have been discussed, and continue to be discussed, by Plato scholars. . . . As Scott notes, there is a deliberate effort by most contributors to break with the tradition, and rethink old assumptions about the Socratic method associated with Vlastos's model. The current lack of consensus between scholars seems to be a desirable effect because it expands and stimulates discussion, especially about what terms one ought to use in talking about Socratic method."

--Rebecca Bensen, Journal of the History of Philosophy

"The fact that each interpreter is able to lend insight into one or another dimension of Platonic thinking without ever establishing anything like a definitive account of the Socratic method speaks well of both the genius of Plato and the construction of this collection of essays."

--Christopher P. Long, Review of Metaphysics

"The result is a refreshing change of focus that challenges commonly held assumptions about Socrates' method of question and answer. . . . The authors of the collected essays have succeeded admirably in reexamining a notion that most Platonic (and non-Platonic) scholars blithely employ and in emphasizing some hitherto unexplored aspects of the Socratic elenchos, thereby deepening our understanding of its nature and function."

--Zina Giannopoulou, Ancient Philosophy

This is a valuable tome a collection of essays from both old lags and young scholars, with widely differing approaches to ancient philosophy, on an important topic in Socratic studies. You can play with the book s title to bring out different emphases, each relevant to a few of the articles in the book: Does Socrates have a method?

I enjoyed this book, while finding plenty to disagree with in many of the papers. Since the writers come from different directions, any scholar will also find plenty to disagree with but of course such disagreement helps to test one s own cherished opinions and attitudes. And so this volume dedicated to the Socratic elenchus will act elenchtically on its readers.

Robin Waterfield, Bryn Mawr Classical Review (BMCR)"

This book puts philosophers and classicists who disagree over methodology in Platonic scholarship in direct conversation with one another in a single volume. That makes this collection of essays attractive to a broad range of scholars, regardless of where they might place themselves on the issue. It has the further virtue of focusing on a single issue.

Jill Gordon, Colby College"

Although Gregory Vlastos seemed to have framed the terms for all discussions of Socrates, this volume by Gary Alan Scott shows how many questions remain unanswered. It recuperates the initial power of Socratic questioning, endlessly rebellious to all scholarship.

Michel Narcy, Directeur de recherche CNRS, Co-directeur de "Philosophie antique""

Scott s anthology recognizes both the critical attention that Vlastos s interpretation received and his powerful impact on how certain issues of Socratic method have been discussed, and continue to be discussed, by Plato scholars.... As Scott notes, there is a deliberate effort by most contributors to break with the tradition, and rethink old assumptions about the Socratic method associated with Vlastos s model. The current lack of consensus between scholars seems to be a desirable effect because it expands and stimulates discussion, especially about what terms one ought to use in talking about Socratic method.

Rebecca Bensen, Journal of the History of Philosophy"

The fact that each interpreter is able to lend insight into one or another dimension of Platonic thinking without ever establishing anything like a definitive account of the Socratic method speaks well of both the genius of Plato and the construction of this collection of essays.

Christopher P. Long, Review of Metaphysics"

The result is a refreshing change of focus that challenges commonly held assumptions about Socrates method of question and answer. . . . The authors of the collected essays have succeeded admirably in reexamining a notion that most Platonic (and non-Platonic) scholars blithely employ and in emphasizing some hitherto unexplored aspects of the Socratic elenchos, thereby deepening our understanding of its nature and function.

Zina Giannopoulou, Ancient Philosophy"

About the Author

Gary Alan Scott is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Loyola College in Maryland.

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