CDN$ 21.52 + CDN$ 3.49 shipping
Only 1 left in stock. Sold by Music on the Web
+ CDN$ 3.49 shipping
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by dbfradin
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: original artwork, jewel case, 1 disc
Compare Offers on Amazon
Add to Cart
CDN$ 21.51
+ CDN$ 3.49 shipping
Sold by: thebookcommunity_ca
Add to Cart
CDN$ 21.54
+ CDN$ 3.49 shipping
Sold by: HSR Mailorder
Add to Cart
CDN$ 30.83
+ CDN$ 3.49 shipping
Sold by: Vanderbilt CA
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Solitude-Solitaire

4.4 out of 5 stars 17 customer reviews

Price: CDN$ 21.52
Only 1 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by Music on the Web.
6 new from CDN$ 21.51 13 used from CDN$ 1.28


Frequently Bought Together

  • Solitude-Solitaire
  • +
  • One More Story
Total price: CDN$ 39.18
Buy the selected items together

Product Details

  • Audio CD (Jan. 22 1987)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Warner Bros
  • ASIN: B000002L9Z
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars 17 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #78,408 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)
  •  Would you like to update product info, give feedback on images, or tell us about a lower price?


1. Big Mistake
2. They Don't Make 'Em Like They Used To
3. Glory Of Love
4. Queen Of The Masquerade Ball
5. Daddy's Girl
6. The Next Time I Fall
7. Wake To Love
8. Solitude/Solitaire
9. Only Love Knows Why

Product Description

Peter Cetera's second solo album was 1986's Solitude/Solitaire. It featured two massive #1 singles, "Glory Of Love" which was the theme from the film, The Karate Kid, Part II, and "The Next Time I Fall" (with Amy Grant). The album was produced by Michael Omartian and was certified RIAA-Platinum.


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
With his departure from Chicago following 17, bassist/vocalist Peter Cetera was quick to go on the solo wagon, as his debut, Solitude/Solitaire came out, ironically at the same time his former band emerged with 18 with a new lead singer. Cetera seems to have left much of the band's sound behind, embracing a fresher but more conventional and inoffensive pop approach, filled with synths and horns, hardly surprising given that the producer was Michael Omartian.
"Big Mistake" is light Duran Duran-type pop about women being the victim of a smooth-talking love and leave type, and says that women don't make that big mistake only once. The song ends with a brief flurry of synth and horns.
The frantic and bouncy "They Don't Make'Em Like They Used To" is an example of Sheena Easton style New Wave. And despite what the title leads one to think, the next line puts down that assumption with "I think they're better than before." The they in the title is about women, which won't go well given the analogy of women being manufactured products.
The next song may smack of 80's Chicago, but given that David Foster's one of the co-writers, hardly surprising. The synth pop ballad "The Glory Of Love," from Karate Kid Part II resurrects old-fashioned chivalry with lines such as "a man who will fight for your honour/I'll be the hero you're thinking of," and "knight in shining armour." I remembered liking this song a lot, but with the element of females having their honour fought for and rescued, I imagine feminists will be seething in rage at this song.
However, it's the next ballad single from the album, "The Next Time I Fall," with languid dreamy keyboard work matching more his duetting partner Amy Grant's softer voice. One of my favourite ballads from the decade.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
After leaving Chicago, frontman Peter Cetera, who was already over 40, launched his solo career, not straying too far from that band's last two albums, but with even more of a pop feel.
Even though there's some songs here that would today define Adult Contemporary radio, keep in mind, it's a POP album. Even though it does go toward the soft side, it wasn't directed solely at that crowd, and that's what makes it instantly likable and listenable the whole way through.
1) Big Mistake -- Keyboard filled minor hit. A jumpy pop/rocker with lyrics about a 'player', and a long, slightly dark guitar solo at the end.
2) They Don't Make 'Em Like They Used To -- A happy, upbeat pop song about girls. Similar in style to the first song, but without any dark traces. In fact, it's probably the most happy sounding song on the album, and my favorite.
3) Glory of Love -- The one ballad everyone knows, even those who aren't familiar with his music. A great, sweeping poppy love song, but unfortunately one of the songs that relegates Peter to permanent 'Adult Contemporary' status.
4) Queen of the Masquerade Ball -- An uptempo, almost dance rhythm-type non hit, also with silly love/relationship lyrics. Very underrated, and just as catchy as the hits.
5) Daddy's Girl -- A mid tempo light pop song with sweet lyrics (the title is self-explanatory).
6) Next Time I Fall -- The other big hit, also a ballad and duet with early 90s pop singer Amy Grant. Even a little mellower and prettier than 'Glory of Love', it's still a great love song.
7) Wake Up To Love -- The silly, dancey pop/rock continues here. Another great, catchy tune that could've been a hit.
8) Title Track -- The only somewhat dark song, especially the scary, wind-howling intro.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
Includes the hits "Glory of Love" and "Next Time I Fall". Other songs include "Big Mistake", a very fast, jerky song with lots of electric guitar, it almost sounds angry, much like the title track "Solitude/Solitaire", obviously about his departure from the group Chicago. A very upbeat song, "Wake Up To Love", is also quick, and Peter's voice is very clear despite the instruments involved. Very intense album, passionate in many places. "Daddy's Girl" is quieter, and describes a little girl who will grow up and leave home, but she'll "always be daddy's girl". Very interesting collection of songs, mostly fast, features guitar, synthesizers and keyboards for that definite 'pop/rock' feel. Not at all like the group Chicago which he left the previous year, the songs take on their own meaning and have their very own life. A must for those who like special effects in their music combined with guitar!
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
With his departure from Chicago following 17, bassist/vocalist Peter Cetera was quick to go on the solo wagon, as his debut, Solitude/Solitaire came out, ironically at the same time his former band emerged with 18 with a new lead singer. Cetera seems to have left much of the band's sound behind, embracing a fresher but more conventional pop approach, filled with synths and horns, hardly surprising given that the producer was Michael Omartian.
"Big Mistake" is light Duran Duran-type pop about women being the victim of a smooth-talking love and leave type, and says that women don't make that big mistake only once. The song ends with a brief flurry of synth and horns.
The frantic and bouncy "They Don't Make'Em Like They Used To" is an example of Sheena Easton style New Wave. And despite what the title leads one to think, the next line puts down that assumption with "I think they're better than before." The they in the title is about women, which won't go well given the analogy of women being rolled off the assembly line.
The next song may smack of 80's Chicago, but given that David Foster's one of the co-writers, hardly surprising. The synth pop ballad "The Glory Of Love," from Karate Kid Part II resurrects old-fashioned chivalry with lines such as "a man who will fight for your honour/I'll be the hero you're thinking of," and "knight in shining armour." I remembered liking this song a lot, but the theme of women needing their honour fought for and rescued is very much passe.
However, it's the next ballad single from the album, "The Next Time I Fall," with languid dreamy keyboard work matching more his duetting partner Amy Grant's softer voice. One of my favourite ballads from the decade.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse

Most recent customer reviews



Look for similar items by category


Feedback