Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

Station Eleven Paperback – Jan 1 2015

4.3 out of 5 stars 80 customer reviews

See all 18 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, Jan 1 2015
CDN$ 9.19 CDN$ 8.54

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
click to open popover

No Kindle device required. Download one of the Free Kindle apps to start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, and computer.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Vintage (Jan. 1 2015)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0804172447
  • ISBN-13: 978-0804172448
  • Product Dimensions: 13.2 x 2 x 20.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 272 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars 80 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #152,191 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  •  Would you like to update product info, give feedback on images, or tell us about a lower price?


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
What IS Station Eleven about? Is it about “Station Eleven”- the comic book that was written by one character, given to another, and passed on to several more? Is it about the Traveling Symphony- performing throughout various human settlements that exist after the spread of the “Georgian Flu” that eliminated most of humanity? What about Arthur- the famous actor that begins this story? Or “the Prophet” who becomes a pseudo-religious leader in the wake of the outbreak?
Yes. All this and more. This novel, by Canadian author Emily St. John Mandel is difficult to describe. There are many characters, many corresponding timelines, and many plots.
“Station Eleven” is definitely a unique novel. Although its theme (or one of them) is the overdone “post-apocalyptic” Earth, the story is not at all boring or derivative. Each character is important to the plot in some way, and they are, of course, all intertwined. The book was confusing in spots, as it often jumped from one place in time to another without warning, and I would’ve likely enjoyed it more had there been more of a structure to it.
The Traveling Symphony was the most interesting part by far, and all of the post-outbreak world, and I would’ve liked to have seen more of this in the plot. Arthur, the actor, played an extremely important part in the novel, and had connections to most of the characters that Mandel focused on. However, his role was not clearly defined until the very end of the book and I did not even understand why he existed at all until the final few chapters.
The novel is entirely different than I expected. Mandel is creative and her characters are realistic and well-defined.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
This tale begins and ends with the same death. As Hamlet opens, an aging actor fumbles his final lines. Within days, the world is cast into darkness as a deadly virus kills off most of mankind. I enjoyed sharing what seemed to be very personal experiences of a closely knit cast of characters.

As we follow two decades of post-apocalyptic drama, St. John Mandel breathes life into what is undoubtedly the worst of times as mankind teeters on the brink. The rich tapestry of characters blend together, immersing the reader within their close personal thoughts and their subtle encounters. She has captured the realities of a world without hope. And yet within this dark saga of death and sadness there may still live some sliver of hope for the future.

An unusual element mixed in with this captivating tale and connected to its key characters is a graphic scifi novel that seems to parallel the tragedy itself adding its own unusual tale and flavour to the story.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
Literary post-apocalyptic fiction is a narrow niche genre. Sure, there are scads of works out there featuring end of the world scenarios but these are largely poorly written and edited zombie yarns that have grown repetitive. So it is wonderful when a book like Station Eleven appears. It is in the vein of The Road but has more in common with Colson Whitehead's Zone One or, even more so, Douglas Coupland's Player One. In fact, I would say Player One must have been a significant influence upon St. John Mandel. The two share Canadian plot setting and a more intellectual rationale for when the world falls apart (BTW - The New York Times review of Whitehead's novel began with, "A literary novelist writing a genre novel is like an intellectual dating a porn star.").

Station Eleven begins in a highly compelling manner and never lets up. The initial setting is innocuous but fascinating. A production of King Lear is underway at the Elgin Theatre in Toronto and this, pardon the pun, sets the stage for the next twenty years. We are treated to a cast of characters who have been inextricably woven together in a plot that goes back and forth in an absorbing way. How the world fell apart, how people reacted to it and how they function after is artfully done. What must be credited is no unnecessary or gratuitous description of the resulting violence. Instead, my new best friend Emily, writes chillingly and more effectively, "Of all of them at the bar that night, the bartender was the one who survived the longest. He died three weeks later on the road out of the city."

The loss of what the characters once enjoyed in modern civilization permeates the book like an ever-present melancholy.
Read more ›
9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I loved this book! It actually surprised me that I did, because it's not my usual genre. "Station Eleven" is post-apocalyptic and somewhat allegorical...at least to me. I read somewhere that this is a book about memory, and I agree. It is also a book of dramatic moments, woven into a compelling story with great character development.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Bleak, and yet so hopeful. This story is not about the details of the virus, or the mad days during the outbreak, or any sudden upstart heroes, but about the never-ending struggle of a handful of people who were just caught in the middle of this, over the decades that come after the end of everything. The story circles like revolving doors, the story moves back and forth in time from months/years before the virus to many decades after, and though it centers around one character (Arthur), his life is told through the eyes of many others who knew him--it's not so much about him as it is about everyone else and he is simply the common thread. Station Eleven itself is a story that one of the characters was writing before the end, symbolism that parallels the story line throughout.

I liked how the story went no where in particular--the hopelessness of it all is very palpable. When 99% of the world dies, you may be left with no one with any particular skills to rebuild anything in the new world, so you simply keep reusing whatever you can find forever until there is nothing. And yet, despite this, you have this travelling caravan of actors and musicians performing Shakespeare. And why not? Hope and beauty when there is none else left.
One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse

Most recent customer reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback