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Tarantino XX Collection (Bilingual) [Blu-ray]

3.9 out of 5 stars 34 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Actors: Samuel L. Jackson, Uma Thurman, Lucy Liu, John Travolta, Christian Slater
  • Directors: Quentin Tarantino
  • Writers: Quentin Tarantino
  • Format: NTSC, AC-3, Widescreen, Dolby, DTS Surround Sound, Box set, Color, Dubbed, Subtitled, Blu-ray
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: French, Spanish
  • Dubbed: French
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.77:1
  • Number of discs: 8
  • Studio: Alliance Films
  • Release Date: Nov. 20 2012
  • Run Time: 1043 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars 34 customer reviews
  • ASIN: B009EDY6R2
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #10,095 in Movies & TV Shows (See Top 100 in Movies & TV Shows)
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Product description

Amazon.ca

Quentin Tarantino has impacted fans and critics alike with his eclectic and brilliantly violent films for the past 20 years. First stepping onto the scene with Reservoir Dogs, nominated for the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival and winner of the International Critics Award at the Toronto International Film Festival, he made a name for himself and has since left his mark on cinema history and commanded a cult audience. In celebration of his 20 years of filmmaking genius, fans can bring home the ultimate Tarantino Blu-ray collection. Featuring 8 essential films – Pulp Fiction, Reservoir Dogs, Jackie Brown, Inglourious Basterds, Kill Bill Vol. 1, Kill Bill Vol. 2, Death Proof and True Romance – plus 2 bonus discs with over 5 hours of never-before-seen special features, this explosive set has it all.

Bonus Disc 1

• “20 Years of Filmmaking” Featurette -
It has been 20 years since Quentin Tarantino released his first movie, Reservoir Dogs, and gave the world notice of his filmmaking genius. This piece takes a look at his career from the beginning, featuring interviews with co-workers, critics, stars and master filmmakers alike as well as a tribute to his greatest collaborator, Sally Menke.

Jackie Brown Q&A Session Pam Grier, Robert Forster and Quentin Tarantino discuss the making of Jackie Brown and their personal experiences with the film

Bonus Disc 2

• Never-before-seen Critics’ Retrospective
• In depth critics discussion piece exploring Quentin Tarantino’s films that redefined cinema and the impact they’ve made on his career as one of the most influential writers/directors of our time

Inglourious Basterds

Brad Pitt takes no prisoners in Quentin Tarantino’s high-octane WWII revenge fantasy Inglourious Basterds. As war rages in Europe, a Nazi-scalping squad of American soldiers, known to their enemy as “The Basterds,” is on a daring mission to take down the leaders of the Third Reich. Bursting with “action, hair-trigger suspense and a machine-gun spray of killer dialogue” (Peter Travers, Rolling Stone), Inglourious Basterds is “another Tarantino masterpiece” (Jake Hamilton, CBS-TV)!

Special Features
• Extended & Alternate Scenes
• Roundtable Discussion with Quentin Tarantino, Brad Pitt and Elvis Mitchell
• The Making of "Nation's Pride"
• A Conversation with Rod Taylor
• "Nation's Pride:" The Film Within The Film
• The Original Inglorious Bastards
• Quentin Tarantino's Camera Angel
• Film Poster Gallery Tour
• Rod Taylor on Victoria Bitter
• Hi Sally's
• Killin' Nazis Trivia Challenge
• Trailers

Pulp Fiction

“Nothing less than a cultural phenomenon” (Moviemaker Magazine), Quentin Tarantino’s Pulp Fiction has been hailed by critics and audiences worldwide as a film that redefined cinema. Tarantino delivers an unforgettable cast of characters – including a pair of low-rent hit men (John Travolta and Samuel L. Jackson), their boss’s sexy wife (Uma Thurman) and a desperate prizefighter (Bruce Willis) – in a wildly entertaining and exhilarating blend of crime-thriller-drama-comedy that is completely original and entirely unforgettable. Nominated for 7 Academy Awards® including Best Picture and Best Director, Pulp Fiction packs the punch like an adrenaline shot to the heart.

With the knockout one-two punch of 1992's Reservoir Dogs and 1994's Pulp Fiction writer-director Quentin Tarantino stunned the filmmaking world, exploding into prominence as a cinematic heavyweight contender. But Pulp Fiction was more than just the follow-up to an impressive first feature, or the winner of the Palme d'Or at Cannes Film Festival, or a script stuffed with the sort of juicy bubblegum dialogue actors just love to chew, or the vehicle that reestablished John Travolta on the A-list, or the relatively low-budget ($8 million) independent showcase for an ultrahip mixture of established marquee names and rising stars from the indie scene (among them Samuel L. Jackson, Uma Thurman, Bruce Willis, Ving Rhames, Harvey Keitel, Christopher Walken, Tim Roth, Amanda Plummer, Julia Sweeney, Kathy Griffin, and Phil Lamar). It was more, even, than an unprecedented $100-million-plus hit. Pulp Fiction was a sensation. No, it was not the Second Coming (I actually think Reservoir Dogs is a more substantial film; and P.T. Anderson outdid Tarantino in 1997 by making his directorial debut with two even more mature and accomplished pictures, Hard Eight and Boogie Nights). But Pulp Fiction packs so much energy and invention into telling its nonchronologically interwoven short stories (all about temptation, corruption, and redemption amongst modern criminals, large and small) it leaves viewers both exhilarated and exhausted--hearts racing and knuckles white from the ride. (Oh, and the infectious, surf-guitar-based soundtrack is tastier than a Royale with Cheese.) --Jim Emerson

Special Features
• Interviews with the cast
• Critics' Retrospective on the Movie's Place in Film History
• Deleted Scenes
• “Pulp Fiction: The Facts” Featurette
• Behind-the-Scenes Footage
• Production Design Featurette
• Siskel & Ebert "At the Movies” – "The Tarantino Generation"
• Cannes Film Festival – Palme d’Or Acceptance Speech
• “Charlie Rose” Interview with Quentin Tarantino
• Independent Spirit Awards footage
• Still Galleries
• Trivia Track

Kill Bill Vol. 1

KILL BILL VOL. 1The acclaimed fourth film from groundbreaking writer and director Quentin Tarantino (PULP FICTION, JACKIE BROWN), KILL BILL VOL. 1 stars Uma Thurman (PULP FICTION), Lucy Liu (CHARLIE'S ANGELS, CHICAGO), and Vivica A. Fox (TWO CAN PLAY THAT GAME) in an astonishing, action-packed thriller about brutal betrayal and an epic vendetta! Four years after taking a bullet in the head at her own wedding, The Bride (Thurman) emerges from a coma and decides it's time for payback...with a vengeance! Having been gunned down by her former boss (David Carradine) and his deadly squad of international assassins, it's a kill-or-be-killed fight she didn't start but is determined to finish! Loaded with explosive action and outrageous humor, it's a must-see motion picture event that has critics everywhere raving!

Quentin Tarantino'sKill Bill, Vol. 1 is trash for connoisseurs. From his opening gambit (including a "Shaw-Scope" logo and gaudy '70s-vintage "Our Feature Presentation" title card) to his cliffhanger finale (a teasing lead-in to 2004's Vol. 2), Tarantino pays loving tribute to grindhouse cinema, specifically the Hong Kong action flicks and spaghetti Westerns that fill his fervent brain--and this frequently breathtaking movie--with enough cinematic references and cleverly pilfered soundtrack cues to send cinephiles running for their reference books. Everything old is new again in Tarantino's humor-laced vision: he steals from the best while injecting his own oft-copied, never-duplicated style into what is, quite simply, a revenge flick, beginning with the near-murder of the Bride (Uma Thurman), pregnant on her wedding day and left for dead by the Deadly Viper Assassination Squad (or DiVAS)--including Lucy Liu and the unseen David Carradine (as Bill)--who become targets for the Bride's lethal vengeance. Culminating in an ultraviolent, ultra-stylized tour-de-force showdown, Tarantino's fourth film is either brilliantly (and brutally) innovative or one of the most blatant acts of plagiarism ever conceived. Either way, it's hyperkinetic eye-candy from a passionate film-lover who clearly knows what he's doing. --Jeff Shannon

Special Features
• The Making of Kill Bill Volume 1
• Bonus Musical Performances by the "5,6,7,8's"
• Quentin Tarantino Movie Trailers, Including Kill Bill Vol. 2

Kill Bill Vol. 2

Kill Bill Vol. 2With this thrilling, must-see movie event, writer and director Quentin Tarantino (PULP FICTION) completes the action-packed quest for revenge begun by The Bride (Uma Thurman) in Kill Bill Vol. 1! Having already crossed two names from her Death List, the Bride is back with a vengeance and taking aim at Budd (Michael Madsen) and Elle Driver (Daryl Hannah), the only survivors from the squad of assassins who betrayed her four years earlier. It's all leading up to the ultimate confrontation with Bill (David Carradine), The Bride's former master and the man who ordered her execution! As the acclaimed follow-up to the instant classic Vol. 1 -- you know all about the unlimited action and humor, but until you've seen Kill Bill Vol. 2, you only know half the story!

"The Bride" (Uma Thurman) gets her satisfaction--and so do we--in Quentin Tarantino's "roaring rampage of revenge," Kill Bill, Vol. 2. Where Vol. 1 was a hyper-kinetic tribute to the Asian chop-socky grindhouse flicks that have been thoroughly cross-referenced in Tarantino's film-loving brain, Vol. 2--not a sequel, but Part Two of a breathtakingly cinematic epic--is Tarantino's contemporary martial-arts Western, fueled by iconic images, music, and themes lifted from any source that Tarantino holds dear, from the action-packed cheapies of William Witney (one of several filmmakers Tarantino gratefully honors in the closing credits) to the spaghetti epics of Sergio Leone. Tarantino doesn't copy so much as elevate the genres he loves, and the entirety of Kill Bill is clearly the product of a singular artistic vision, even as it careens from one influence to another. Violence erupts with dynamic impact, but unlike Vol. 1, this slower grand finale revels in Tarantino's trademark dialogue and loopy longueurs, reviving the career of David Carradine (who plays Bill for what he is: a snake charmer), and giving Thurman's Bride an outlet for maternal love and well-earned happiness. Has any actress endured so much for the sake of a unique collaboration? As the credits remind us, "The Bride" was jointly created by "Q&U," and she's become an unforgettable heroine in a pair of delirious movie-movies (Vol. 3 awaits, some 15 years hence) that Tarantino fans will study and love for decades to come. --Jeff Shannon

Special Features
• "Damoe" Deleted Scene
• The Making Of Kill Bill Volume 2
• "Chingon" Musical Performance

Reservoir Dogs

Four Perfect Killers. One Perfect Crime. Critically acclaimed for its raw power and breathtaking ferocity, it's the brilliant American gangster movie classic from writer-director Quentin Tarantino. They were perfect strangers, assembled to pull off the perfect crime. Then their simple robbery explodes into bloody ambush, and the ruthless killers realize one of them is a police informer. But which one?

Quentin Tarantino came out of nowhere (i.e., a video store in Manhattan Beach, California) and turned Hollywood on its ear in 1992 with his explosive first feature, Reservoir Dogs. Like Tarantino's mainstream breakthrough Pulp Fiction, Reservoir Dogs has an unconventional structure, cleverly shuffling back and forth in time to reveal details about the characters, experienced criminals who know next to nothing about each other. Joe (Lawrence Tierney) has assembled them to pull off a simple heist, and has gruffly assigned them color-coded aliases (Mr. Orange, Mr. Pink, Mr. White) to conceal their identities from being known even to each other. But something has gone wrong, and the plan has blown up in their faces. One by one, the surviving robbers find their way back to their prearranged warehouse hideout. There, they try to piece together the chronology of this bloody fiasco--and to identify the traitor among them who tipped off the police. Pressure mounts, blood flows, accusations and bullets fly. In the combustible atmosphere these men are forced to confront life-and-death questions of trust, loyalty, professionalism, deception, and betrayal. As many critics have observed, it is a movie about "honor among thieves" (just as Pulp Fiction is about redemption, and Jackie Brown is about survival). Along with everything else, the movie provides a showcase for a terrific ensemble of actors: Harvey Keitel, Tim Roth, Steve Buscemi, Michael Madsen, Christopher Penn, and Tarantino himself, offering a fervent dissection of Madonna's "Like a Virgin" over breakfast. Reservoir Dogs is violent (though the violence is implied rather than explicit), clever, gabby, harrowing, funny, suspenseful, and even--in the end--unexpectedly moving. (Don't forget that "Super Sounds of the Seventies" soundtrack, either.) Reservoir Dogs deserves just as much acclaim and attention as its follow-up, Pulp Fiction, would receive two years later. --Jim Emerson

Special Features
• Pulp Factoids Viewer
• "Playing It Fast and Loose" Documentary
• "Profiling the Reservoir Dogs" Featurette

Jackie Brown

What do a sexy stewardess (Pam Grier), a street-tough gun runner (Samuel L. Jackson), a lonely bail bondsman (Robert Forster), a shifty ex-con (Robert De Niro), an earnest federal agent (Michael Keaton), and a stoned-out beach bunny (Bridget Fonda) have in common? They're six players on the trail of a half million dollars in cash! The only questions are...who's getting played...and who's gonna make the big score? Combining an explosive mix of intense action and edgy humor, Quentin Tarantino's crime thriller introduced Pam Grier and Robert Forster to a new generation of filmgoers and earned Forster an Oscarr nomination.

The curiosity of Quentin Tarantino's Jackie Brown is Robert Forster's worldly wise bail bondsman Max Cherry, the most alive character in this adaptation of Elmore Leonard's Rum Punch. The Academy Awards saw it the same way, giving Forster the film's only nomination. The film is more "rum" than "punch" and will certainly disappoint those who are looking for Tarantino's trademark style. This movie is a slow, decaffeinated story of six characters glued to a half million dollars brought illegally into the country. The money belongs to Ordell (Samuel L. Jackson), a gunrunner just bright enough to control his universe and do his own dirty work. His just-paroled friend--a loose term with Ordell--Louis (Robert De Niro) is just taking up space and could be interested in the money. However, his loyalties are in question between his old partner and Ordell's doped-up girl (Bridget Fonda). Certainly Fed Ray Nicolette (Michael Keaton) wants to arrest Ordell with the illegal money. The key is the title character, a late-40s-ish flight attendant (Pam Grier) who can pull her own weight and soon has both sides believing she's working for them. The end result is rarely in doubt, and what is left is two hours of Tarantino's expert dialogue as he moves his characters around town.

Tarantino changed the race of Jackie and Ordell, a move that means little except that it allows Tarantino to heap on black culture and language, something he has a gift and passion for. He said this film is for an older audience although the language and drug use may put them off. The film is not a salute to Grier's blaxploitation films beyond the musical score. Unexpectedly the most fascinating scenes are between Grier and Forster: two neo-stars glowing in the limelight of their first major Hollywood film after decades of work. --Doug Thomas

Special Features
• Breaking Down Jackie Brown
• “Jackie Brown: How It Went Down” Documentary
• “A Look Back at Jackie Brown Interview with Quentin Tarantino
• Siskel & Ebert "At the Movies” – Jackie Brown Review
Jackie Brown on MTV
• Chicks with Guns Video
• Marketing Gallery
• Still Galleries
• Trivia Track
• Deleted and Alternate Scenes

Death Proof

A deranged stuntman stalks his victims from the safety of his killer car, but when he picks on the wrong group of badass babes, all bets are off in an adrenaline-pumping, high speed, white-knuckle automotive duel of epic proportions, where anything can happen.

Loud, fast, and proudly out of control, Grindhouse is a tribute to the low-budget exploitation movies that lurked at drive-ins and inner city theaters in the '60s and early '70s. Writers/directors Quentin Tarantino (Kill Bill) and Robert Rodriguez (Sin City) cooked up this three-hour double feature as a way to pay homage to these films, and the end result manages to evoke the down-and-dirty vibe of the original films for an audience that may be too young to remember them. Tarantino's Death Proof is the mellower of the two, relatively speaking; it's wordier (as to be expected) and rife with pulp/comic book posturing and eminently quotable dialogue. It also features a terrific lead performance by Kurt Russell as a homicidal stunt man whose weapon of choice is a souped-up car. Tarantino's affection for his own dialogue slows down the action at times, but he does provide showy roles for a host of likable actresses, including Rosario Dawson, Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Rose McGowan, Sydney Poitier, and newcomer Zoe Bell, who was Uma Thurman's stunt double in Kill Bill. Detractors may decry the rampant violence and latch onto a sexist undertone in Tarantino's feature, but for those viewers who grew up watching these types of films in either theaters or on VHS, such elements will be probably be more of a virtue than a detrimental factor. -- Paul Gaita

Special Features
• "Stunts on Wheels: The Legendary Drivers of Death Proof" Featurette
• "Introducing Zoe Bell" Featurette
• "Kurt Russell as Stuntman Mike" Featurette
• The Uncut Version of "Baby, It's You" Performed by Mary Elizabeth Winstead
• Quentin's Greatest Collaborator: Editor Sally Menke
Double Dare Trailer
Death Proof International Trailer
• An International Poster Gallery

True Romance

Comic book store worker Christian Slater falls in love with hooker Patricia Arquette, kills her pimp and unknowingly swipes a suitcase loaded with cocaine. The couple heads to L.A. to sell the coke for big money, but both the cops and the drug ring's boss are on their trail. Stylishly violent actioner, directed by Tony Scott from Quentin Tarantino's script, also stars Christopher Walken, Dennis Hopper, Brad Pitt, Gary Oldman.

It was directed with energetic skill by Top Gun Tony Scott, but this breathtaking 1993 thriller (think of it as an adolescent crime fantasy on steroids) has Quentin Tarantino written all over it. True Romance is really part of a loose trilogy that includes Reservoir Dogs and Pulp Fiction, with a crackling Tarantino screenplay that rides a fine line between raucous comedy and violent excess. Christian Slater plays Clarence, the comic-book lover who meets a beguiling prostitute named Alabama (Patricia Arquette), confronts her vicious pimp (Gary Oldman), and embarks on a cross-country odyssey with $5 million worth of Mafia cocaine. Mayhem ensues, culminating in a favorite Tarantino climax--the "Mexican standoff"--in which a roomful of guys are pointing guns at each other, waiting to see who shoots first. Brutal, profane, and totally outrageous, True Romance is not for everyone, but with a supporting cast that includes Dennis Hopper, Christopher Walken, Brad Pitt, and Val Kilmer (as the ghost of Elvis!), you can be sure this movie will never be boring. --Jeff Shannon

Special Features
• Commentary by Christian Slater and Patricia Arquette
• Commentary by Tony Scott
• Commentary by Quentin Tarantino
• Scene Selective Commentary By Val Kilmer, Dennis Hopper, Brad Pitt And Michael Rapaport
• Deleted/Extended Scenes With Optional Director Commentary
• Alternate Ending With Optional Director and Writer Commentary
• Original 1993 Featurette
• Behind The Scenes Interactive Featurette
• Animated Photo Gallery
• Theatrical Trailer


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