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Tenebre:

4.2 out of 5 stars 79 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Actors: Anthony Franciosa, Giuliano Gemma, Christian Borromeo, Mirella D'Angelo, Veronica Lario
  • Directors: Dario Argento
  • Writers: Dario Argento
  • Producers: Claudio Argento, Salvatore Argento
  • Format: Color, DVD-Video, NTSC, Special Edition, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: UNRATED
  • Studio: ANCHOR BAY
  • Release Date: May 27 2008
  • Run Time: 101 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars 79 customer reviews
  • ASIN: B0015D3YR2
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #57,900 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)
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Product Description

Amazon.ca

After several excursions into supernatural horror, Dario Argento returned to the homicidal frenzy that made his reputation with this mystery that plays more like a grown-up slasher movie than a detective thriller. Anthony Franciosa stars as Peter Neal, a bestselling horror novelist whose promotional tour in Italy takes a terrible turn when a mysterious killer re-creates the brutal murders from his book with real-life victims. The first to die are so-called "deviants," Neal's own friends, and finally there comes a promise that the author himself is next on the list. Columbo it ain't, but Argento has always been more concerned with style than story and his execution of the crimes is pure cinematic bravura. From the simple beauty of a straight razor shattering a light bulb (the camera catches the red-hot filament slowly blacking out) to an ambitious crane shot that creeps up and over the sides of a house under siege in a voyeuristic survey that would make Hitchcock proud, Argento turns the art of murder into a stylish spectacle. He even lets his kinkier side show with flashbacks of an adolescent boy and a teasing dominatrix in red stiletto heels that become a key motif of the film. The objects of Argento's homicidal tendencies are traditionally lovely, scantily clad Italian beauties, and with self-deprecating humor he even inserts a scene in which Neal is taken to task for the misogynist violence of his stories--an accusation Argento himself has weathered for years. --Sean Axmaker --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD Verified Purchase
When Peter Neal (Anthony Franciosa), a popular horror novelist visits Rome to promote his latest best-seller "Tenebrae", he is suddenly thrust into a world of murder and mayhem when a psychopath goes on a killing spree and uses techniques described in his book. The killer seems to be on a mission, killing off people (mostly women) who are morally corrupt and are referred to by the killer as "deviants".

This blood-soaked, fast-moving Argento flick is not in the same classic level as his masterpiece "Suspiria" or even "Deep Red" but his fans seem to love it regardless. The film is not really a horror film but a sexually charged thriller with an attractive cast, solid acting (although some of the dubbing is pretty annoying), creative camera angles (typical in an Argento film) and lot's of blood (again, typical of an Argento film). Like Argento's other work, this film is visually stunning. The entire cast is made up of photogenic, elegant actors; Daria Nicolodi, Mirella D'Angelo, Anthony Franciosa, John Saxon, Ania Pieroni and a whole array of European beauties. Argento also uses the color red effectively throughout this film; bright red lipstick, red stilettos, red cars, countless scenes of gleaming red blood. It takes someone like Dario Argento to make blood look so beautiful on screen.

This film was released in North America in a heavily edited form and under the insane title of "Unsane". I've never seen the edited version but apparently many scenes were cut in order for the film to get an "R" rating. "Tenebrae" may be violent but the violence itself is no more shocking then the numerous slasher films released from Hollywood throughout the decade so it's a mystery to me as to why this film was given this kind of treatment.
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Dreamlike, moody Argento thriller doesn't try to be the non-stop set-piece that is "Suspiria", but is startlingly seductive nonetheless. The many bits of almost inexplicable panic that shoot through the film: objects and comments whose portentousness is sometimes more evident to the viewer than the characters, sometimes not; quick bangs of unexpected intercutting; and a surreal sequence (dream? flashback?)that is introduced and finished without explanation-- contribute to a mood of nightmarish excitement, like one of those horrific dreams in which you've been thrown in with people of whom you know little, threatened on every side by an unseen menace. That menace takes the form of a serial killer making fiction-into-fact of Peter Neal's latest novel. Argento seems to be in a let-it-all-hang-out mood here (but when isn't he?); the thickly decadent Eurodisco soundtrack that accompanies these lovingly-staged slaughters seems designed to inhance any charges of turning murder into voyeuristic spectacle. The killings that immediately follow on the heels of that bizarre dream-sequence bear this out: they're a sex-and-death orgy that takes the horror genre into Baudelaire. But the richest and most elaborate sequence of all concerns the hotel owner's nubile daughter, who gets stranded in some very sticky circumstances in the middle of the night in Rome. Pitch-perfect.
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Dreamlike, moody Argento thriller doesn't try to be the non-stop set-piece that is "Suspiria", but is startlingly seductive nonetheless. The many bits of almost inexplicable panic that shoot through the film: objects and comments whose portentousness is sometimes more evident to the viewer than the characters, sometimes not; quick bangs of unexpected intercutting; and a surreal sequence (dream? flashback?)that is introduced and finished without explanation-- contribute to a mood of nightmarish excitement, like one of those horrific dreams in which you've been thrown in with people of whom you know little, threatened on every side by an unseen menace. That menace takes the form of a serial killer making fiction-into-fact of Peter Neal's latest novel. Argento seems to be in a let-it-all-hang-out mood here (but when isn't he?); the thickly decadent Eurodisco soundtrack that accompanies these lovingly-staged slaughters seems designed to inhance any charges of turning murder into voyeuristic spectacle. The killings that immediately follow on the heels of that bizarre dream-sequence bear this out: they're a sex-and-death orgy that takes the horror genre into Baudelaire. But the richest and most elaborate sequence of all concerns the hotel owner's nubile daughter, who gets stranded in some very sticky circumstances in the middle of the night in Rome. Pitch-perfect.
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After many years and after doing only supernatural movies (SUSPIRIA, INFERNO) Dario Argento returned to the genre that made him famous, the italian giallo genre. This was a well recieved film when it came out. And instead of using the dark cinematography he usually uses he decided to try making this film sunny and it does not lessen the impact of the film. It is about an american author named Peter Neal(Anthony Franciosa) who is promoting his new book TENEBRAE in Rome and while he's there a mysterious killer (using the black gloves that have become a recurring prop in Argento's giallo films) viciously murders "perverts" in the same way as in the book TENEBRAE. He murders a theif, lesbians, etc. He considers them perverts. The movie is relentlessly violent, especially towards the end and it has many plot twists. Argento relies more on narrative in this film than he usually does but it still has his same style. It again features a great score by Goblin and it also features the director's wife, Daria Nicolodi. For the recored she has been in many of his films(DEEP RED, INFERNO, TERROR AT THE OPERA a.k.a OPERA and PHENOMENA a.k.a CREEPERS). This is one of Argento's best films and it features many famous sequences, including a crane shot that was very difficult to pull off in those days.
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