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Three Witnesses Mass Market Paperback – Sep 1 1994

5.0 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Crimeline; Reissue edition (Sept. 1 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0553249592
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553249590
  • Product Dimensions: 10.5 x 1.6 x 17.7 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 118 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #302,397 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

About the Author

Rex Stout, born 1886 in Indiana/USA, worked at thirty different professions until he earned enough money to travel. In 1932, he began to write thrillers focusing on the famous detective Nero Wolfe. Nero is a gourmet weighing more than a hundred kilos, and moving as little as possible. Rex Stout finished more than fifty novels and received the "Grand Masters Award." He died 1975.
Rex Stout,1886 in Indiana/USA geboren, soll ca. dreiig Berufe ausgeubt haben, bevor er mit einem von ihm selbst konzipierten Sparkassensystem so viel Geld verdiente, da er ausgedehnte Reisen unternehmen konnte. 1932 begann er, Kriminalromane zu schreiben in deren Mittelpunkt fast immer der beruhmte Privatdetektiv Nero Wolfe steht. Dieser ist eine uber hundert Kilo "schwergewichtiger" Gourmet, der sich so wenig wie moglich bewegt und leidenschaftlicher Orchideenzuchter ist. Rex Stout wurde fur seine uber funfzig Romane mit dem "Grand Masters Award" ausgezeichnet. Er starb 1975.

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Format: Paperback
Rex Stout: Three Witnesses.
One doesn't read Rex Stout for the dramatic detection or unusual cases. One reads him for the unforgettable characters of two original detectives. One is Nero Wolfe, foreign born, a great deductive mind, who hates to be away from his house in New York of the early 20th century, where his meals are served by his cook at the same hour day by day, and from his beloved orchids, which he is growing in his own orangerie in the very same house. His factotum and contact with the world is Archie Goodwin, young and flirtatious, who is sometimes laughing at Wolfe's rigidity, but deeply respects his wisdom. In a sense, Archie is Wolfe's disciple, learning not only how to follow and link the clues, but also how to behave with clients and the police force.
In this book there are three short detective stories, solved mostly by Wolfe while he stays in his comfortable house and thinks about clues, provided for him by Archie, newspapers, and sometimes Inspector Cramer, of whom, however, Wolfe is usually ahead.

I would sincerely recommend this book, and others dealing with Nero Wolfe to each and every reader who is interested in human characters.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Nero Wolfe may be enjoyed through the media of print, audio, and video--in print courtesy of Bantam Books; on audio courtesy of Durkin Hayes, Radio Spirits, and Books on Tape; and on video courtesy of A&E Network. It's hard to say which way gives the most pleasure. As much as I like the A&E shows, and as much as I like Durkin Hayes' editions of the CBC radio shows, I think the best way to enjoy Nero Wolfe is in print. And the best way to enjoy him in print is in Rex Stout's novelettes. The novels are good, but the novelettes are tauter, faster-paced, and funnier. "Three Witnesses" serves up three very good novelettes. In "The Next Witness" Wolfe sits uncomfortably in a crowded courtroom, under subpoena, and waiting to give truthful testimony which he expects will materially contribute to the conviction for murder of an innocent man. What to do, what to do? Flee the courtroom, dodge the arrest warrant issued for contempt of court, and bring the real murderer to justice before the judge can bang his gavel down on a sentence of imprisonment for contempt. That sounds easy enough, doesn't it? In "When a Man Murders", a millionaire returns from the dead to retrieve the fortune which was divided among his heirs and reclaim the "widow" who has entered into a much happier second marriage. The "widow" comes to Wolfe for his assistance in obtaining a divorce from her recently resurrected spouse. Not to worry, he almost immediately dies again, but the widow's new husband is arrested for murder. Wolfe must penetrate a web of lies to determine who among the heirs had the most to gain from the millionaire's second death. In "Die Like a Dog" an improbable chain of coincidences brings Nero Wolfe together with Nero the Labrador Retriever. Together they unravel a murder mystery, reunite a couple, and retrieve Archie Goodwin's raincoat. "Die Like a Dog" and "The Next Witness" have both been televised on the A&E series.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
To date (beginning of season 2), 2 of the 3 stories herein have been adapted by A&E with Maury Chaykin as Wolfe; the TV series is extremely faithful to the original stories.
"The Next Witness" - (Adapted for _Nero Wolfe_'s 2nd season.) Wolfe makes a point of never leaving home on business, but alas, subpoenas are an occupational hazard for private investigators, and even Wolfe can't always shuffle them off onto Archie, even when the defendant never made it to the status of client.
Wolfe didn't deliver Leonard Ashe to the law; he rejected Ashe as a client because he won't touch marital squabbles. Ashe is being tried for the murder of one of the operators of his telephone answering service, apparently after a failed attempt to bribe her to tap his wife's calls. Wolfe, after hearing the testimony of preceding witnesses, skips out on the subpoena, taking Archie along, having become convinced that Ashe is innocent, though he doesn't at first explain why. See if you can deduce his reasons before the grand finale.
When Wolfe finally does take the stand quite a while later (now, of course, facing contempt of court), he has a diabolically clever plan to get his new evidence before the jury. Enjoy.
When a Man Murders... - Sydney Karnow had wealth, a sardonic sense of humor, a nice wife, and a pack of sponging relatives. A year after his marriage, he volunteered for army service in the Korean War, and was reported dead within a year, leaving his fortune divided between his wife (50%) and the spongers (50% divided 3 ways), so all were well provided for if not filthy rich.
Now, 3 years later, he's come back *alive* - two years after Caroline's remarriage to Paul Aubry.
Read more ›
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0xa663e858) out of 5 stars 27 reviews
27 of 28 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa66642b8) out of 5 stars Three Tales of Death and Deduction July 10 2002
By George R Dekle - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Nero Wolfe may be enjoyed through the media of print, audio, and video--in print courtesy of Bantam Books; on audio courtesy of Durkin Hayes, Radio Spirits, and Books on Tape; and on video courtesy of A&E Network. It's hard to say which way gives the most pleasure. As much as I like the A&E shows, and as much as I like Durkin Hayes' editions of the CBC radio shows, I think the best way to enjoy Nero Wolfe is in print. And the best way to enjoy him in print is in Rex Stout's novelettes. The novels are good, but the novelettes are tauter, faster-paced, and funnier. "Three Witnesses" serves up three very good novelettes. In "The Next Witness" Wolfe sits uncomfortably in a crowded courtroom, under subpoena, and waiting to give truthful testimony which he expects will materially contribute to the conviction for murder of an innocent man. What to do, what to do? Flee the courtroom, dodge the arrest warrant issued for contempt of court, and bring the real murderer to justice before the judge can bang his gavel down on a sentence of imprisonment for contempt. That sounds easy enough, doesn't it? In "When a Man Murders", a millionaire returns from the dead to retrieve the fortune which was divided among his heirs and reclaim the "widow" who has entered into a much happier second marriage. The "widow" comes to Wolfe for his assistance in obtaining a divorce from her recently resurrected spouse. Not to worry, he almost immediately dies again, but the widow's new husband is arrested for murder. Wolfe must penetrate a web of lies to determine who among the heirs had the most to gain from the millionaire's second death. In "Die Like a Dog" an improbable chain of coincidences brings Nero Wolfe together with Nero the Labrador Retriever. Together they unravel a murder mystery, reunite a couple, and retrieve Archie Goodwin's raincoat. "Die Like a Dog" and "The Next Witness" have both been televised on the A&E series.
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa666430c) out of 5 stars A trio of excellent short stories March 30 2002
By Michele L. Worley - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
To date (beginning of season 2), 2 of the 3 stories herein have been adapted by A&E with Maury Chaykin as Wolfe; the TV series is extremely faithful to the original stories.
"The Next Witness" - (Adapted for _Nero Wolfe_'s 2nd season.) Wolfe makes a point of never leaving home on business, but alas, subpoenas are an occupational hazard for private investigators, and even Wolfe can't always shuffle them off onto Archie, even when the defendant never made it to the status of client.
Wolfe didn't deliver Leonard Ashe to the law; he rejected Ashe as a client because he won't touch marital squabbles. Ashe is being tried for the murder of one of the operators of his telephone answering service, apparently after a failed attempt to bribe her to tap his wife's calls. Wolfe, after hearing the testimony of preceding witnesses, skips out on the subpoena, taking Archie along, having become convinced that Ashe is innocent, though he doesn't at first explain why. See if you can deduce his reasons before the grand finale.
When Wolfe finally does take the stand quite a while later (now, of course, facing contempt of court), he has a diabolically clever plan to get his new evidence before the jury. Enjoy.
When a Man Murders... - Sydney Karnow had wealth, a sardonic sense of humor, a nice wife, and a pack of sponging relatives. A year after his marriage, he volunteered for army service in the Korean War, and was reported dead within a year, leaving his fortune divided between his wife (50%) and the spongers (50% divided 3 ways), so all were well provided for if not filthy rich.
Now, 3 years later, he's come back *alive* - two years after Caroline's remarriage to Paul Aubry. They used her inheritance to start an automobile agency, but the money didn't bring them to Wolfe - their problem is that their marriage is now invalid. (They're willing to concede anything about the money in exchange for a simple divorce.) Paul can't bring himself to speak with Karnow directly, and Karnow's lawyer won't get involved, so they're approaching Wolfe to act as intermediary.
Ordinarily Wolfe won't touch any case related to marital squabbles, but he's willing in this instance. Unfortunately, when Archie enters Karnow's hotel room at the Churchill, he's dead again, this time for keeps. Did Paul or Caroline try to hire Wolfe as a bluff? Or did one of the spongers (some of whom haven't *got* the money to repay the estate anymore) panic? Or was it something they don't know about yet?
"Die Like a Dog" - This has always been a favourite of mine, and I was very pleasantly surprised when A&E adapted it for _Nero Wolfe_'s 2nd season. A black Labrador literally follows Archie home, and not only retrieves his windblown hat, but turns out to be named 'Nero' (part of a much longer kennel-club name on his collar, but how could Archie resist?)
Unfortunately, the unannounced (even if temporary) introduction of a dog into the hallowed halls of the brownstone backfires in a totally unexpected manner, which you'll have to read/see to believe. :) The *dog* turns out to be a possible witness in a murder investigation, but how the heck can anybody learn anything from him?
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa6664744) out of 5 stars In which Nero leaves the house, handles a messy divorce case and gets a dog! Feb. 5 2006
By Jeanne Tassotto - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
Nero Wolfe has many eccentricities, his orchids, his rigid schedule, his obsessive reading to name a few. Very prominent on this list is that Wolfe rarely leaves the house, NEVER handles divorce cases, and is opposed to animals in his house. In this collection of three novellas all of the above and more occur.

THE NEXT WITNESS is the first story. Nero Wolfe has been summoned to court as a witness in a murder trial. This has necessitated him to abandon his routine, travel in a car, sit in court (next to a woman wearing perfume!) and just when the end of this torment is in sight Wolfe walks out of court. Now a fugitive himself he, and Archie set out to solve the case in a more satifactory manner so Nero can return home. This is hilarious, Wolfe becomes involved in many unusual (for him) situations that he reacts to as only Nero Wolfe could or would.

WHEN A MAN MURDERS.... finds Nero and Archie confronted with a low bank balance and two eager clients which Wolfe would prefer to dismss since the case involves divorce. Still the details are intriguing enough to look into and soon this simple matter becomes one of death and deception.

The final work - DIE LIKE A DOG begins with Archie out on a simple errand. A would be client has taken Archie's raincoat by mistake so Archie go the man's apartment and retrieve his coat. When he arrives at the address he discovers that the situation has been complicated by the man's murder, he leaves in order to avoid dealing with the police but discovers that he has been followed home, by a dog. Archie then decides to have a little fun at Wolfe's expense before locating the dog's owner. Soon however the trio - Archie, Nero and the dog find themselves deeply involved in the case and with no client.

These are particularly funny entries into this long running series. Wolfe is thrust into many situations that he would very much prefer to avoid. Fans are treated to many juicy little tidbits about life in the brownstone and even a fleeting glimpse into Wolfe's mysterious past. The mysteries themselves, although somewhat secondary to the cozy/comic elements in these stories, are very clever, fairly laid out and challenge to reader to solve them before Nero reveals all.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa666472c) out of 5 stars Especially memorable Nero and Archie mysteries May 24 2013
By Swordsman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe comes in two sizes, novel and novella. Whichever size you prefer Nero Wolfe, there is plenty of both: almost three dozen novels, and close to forty novellas. I like the novellas more than the novels, the pace is quicker (the novels are short too). As old as they are I'm surprised all 70-something of them are still in print.

Stout established a standard of quality in his Wolfe and Archie tales; there are no weak stories. All of them are good although some are better than others. When collected in book form the shorter stories are usually published three at a time. There are over a dozen of those three-in-one collections and THREE WITNESSES is one of the best of them. The story ideas and follow-through in `The Next Witness,' 'When A Man Murders,' and `Die Like A Dog' are unfailingly clever, especially nice in the latter.

Nero Wolfe is classic, of course, one of the preeminent eccentric fictional sleuths. He's been called in print 'an American Sherlock Holmes,' as accurate a description of Wolfe as I've ever read. Fortunately he's not quirky to the point of wimpiness, that gets old fast in creations like Hercule Poirot and Philo Vance, puzzle solvers of the genteel variety. Not that the big boy in the brownstone hasn't solved his own fair share of tea party murders, black tie affair killings and deaths out back in the garden type of mysteries, but it's different with Wolfe, his oeuvre also has credible ties to the hardboiled detective school. The reason is Archie Goodwin (not to be confused with the famous comic book writer of the same name). Archie's not as tough as Mike Hammer or Sam Spade but he's still competent enough to accomplish the private eye stuff Wolfe wants done. The milk-drinking good-natured Mr. Goodwin is also handy when a murder suspect of the female persuasion needs to be charmed into attending one of Wolfe's notorious office parties (which usually conclude with one of the guests leaving handcuffed to a policeman).

Props to Rex Stout for bestowing upon his readership a wealthy legacy of enduring mysteries, long and short. And for imbuing Archie with a most effective sense of humor.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa6664be8) out of 5 stars Great Trio July 9 2012
By Ohioan - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The three stories in this collection are all very good. "The Next Witness" starts with Nero and Archie in a courtroom, where they've been subpoenaed to testify in a murder trial. In the middle of the trial, Wolfe leaves the courtroom, taking Archie with him: Wolfe has become convinced that the man being prosecuted is innocent. Upon leaving the courtroom, Wolfe and Archie go to the physical location of the telephone answering service where the murdered woman worked. This expedition neatly leads to another, and soon Wolfe has the suspects and un-suspects where he wants them, with the Assistant D.A. as a witness. Neatly done!

In the second story, "When a Man Murders," Stout has a Korean War soldier, thought dead, return alive after escaping from the prison camp in which he had been held. Stout loved using political events of the day in his fiction, and he usually did it well, as here. While Sidney Karnow was presumed dead, his widow, now wealthy, married another man. How inconvenient the return of Karnow, who now makes his wife a bigamist. His wife and her now-not-husband try to buy Karnow off with what's left of his original fortune, but . . . Karnow is conveniently murdered and Wolfe is hired to prove that the couple didn't do it. Satisfying.

The third story, "Die Like a Dog," is my favorite because it contains one of those oh-so-Wolfe moments when Archie, who wants to annoy his employer by bringing a dog, a black Lab, into the office, learns to his chagrin that Wolfe loves dogs. The dog happened to follow Archie home from the scene of a crime, but Archie does't know why. Wolfe names his new friend Jet, and allows Jet into the rooms and even the kitchen. The police inform Archie and Nero that the dog belonged to the murdered man, so Wolfe sends Archie back to the apartment complex where the murder took place, to see if Archie can find a way that Wolfe can legally keep the dog. From there, a series of complicated interactions between renters and artists and models takes place and leads to the solution of the murder.

An excellent collection of three.

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