CDN$ 4.87
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Usually ships within 1 to 2 months.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Treasure Island has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

Treasure Island Paperback – May 1 1982

4.1 out of 5 stars 175 customer reviews

See all 468 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 4.87
CDN$ 0.01 CDN$ 0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
CDN$ 0.01

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • You'll save an extra 5% on Books purchased from Amazon.ca, now through July 29th. No code necessary, discount applied at checkout. Here's how (restrictions apply)

Frequently Bought Together

  • Treasure Island
  • +
  • Robinson Crusoe
  • +
  • Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
Total price: CDN$ 15.44
Buy the selected items together

No Kindle device required. Download one of the Free Kindle apps to start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, and computer.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Bantam Classics; Reissue edition (May 1 1982)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0553212494
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553212495
  • Product Dimensions: 10.7 x 1.5 x 17.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 113 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars 175 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #142,100 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  •  Would you like to update product info, give feedback on images, or tell us about a lower price?

Product Description

From Booklist

Gr. 5-9. This is one of the best in the picture-book-size Scribner Storybook Classic series. True to the spirit of Stevenson's timeless novel, Timothy Meis' abridged retelling captures the bloody action of mutiny on the high seas and the cutthroat quest for hidden treasure. The story is told through the eyes of brave cabin boy Jim, who fights off the murderous pirates and bonds with their one-legged leader, Long John Silver. Wyeth's thrilling, handsomely reproduced paintings, originally done in 1911, will attract a variety of readers, including some older high-schoolers. In dark shades of brown and red, the pictures focus on the grim, exciting struggle on board the ship and on the island. At the same time, there's a burning golden glow in the background of almost every scene, keeping readers in mind of the treasure that drives the wild action. The most unforgettable painting--and one of Wyeth's most famous--is the melancholy scene of Jim leaving home as his mother weeps in the background. It's the elemental adventure. Hazel Rochman
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Throughout his life, Robert Louis Balfour Stevenson was tormented by poor health. Yet despite frequent physical collapses–mainly due to constant respiratory illness–he was an indefatigable writer of novels, poems, essays, letters, travel books, and children’s books. He was born on November 13, 1850, in Edinburgh, of a prosperous family of lighthouse engineers. Though he was expected to enter the family profession, he studied instead for the Scottish bar. By the time he was called to the bar, however, he had already begun writing seriously, and he never actually practiced law. In 1880, against his family’s wishes, he married an American divorcée, Fanny Vandegrift Osbourne, who was ten years his senior; but the family was soon reconciled to the match, and the marriage proved a happy one.

All his life Stevenson traveled–often in a desperate quest for health. He and Fanny, having married in California and spent their honeymoon by an abandoned silver mine, traveled back to Scotland, then to Switzerland, to the South of France, to the American Adirondacks, and finally to the south of France, to the South Seas. As a novelist he was intrigued with the genius of place: Treasure Island (1883) began as a map to amuse a boy. Indeed, all his works reveal a profound sense of landscape and atmosphere: Kidnapped (1886); The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886); The Master of Ballantrae (1889).

In 1889 Stevenson’s deteriorating health exiled him to the tropics, and he settled in Samoa, where he was given patriarchal status by the natives. His health improved, yet he remained homesick for Scotland, and it was to the “cold old huddle of grey hills” of the Lowlands that he returned in his last, unfinished masterpiece, Weir of Hermiston (1896).

Stevenson dies suddenly on December 3, 1894, not of the long-feared tuberculosis, but of a cerebral hemorrhage. The kindly author of Jekyll and Hyde went down to the cellar to fetch a bottle of his favorite burgundy, uncorked it in the kitchen, abruptly cried out to his wife, “What’s the matter with me, what is this strangeness, has my face changed?”–and fell to the floor. The brilliant storyteller and master of transformations had been struck down at forty-four, at the height of his creative powers.

See all Product Description

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback
Treasure Island is arguably one of the greatest works of storytelling in the English language. Stevenson created other novels, with greater depth and insight, but the highlight of Treasure Island is the combination of color and poetic prose that distinguishes his tale of piracy and boyhood adventure from the rest of the field of other adventure books. The title alone paints an image of suspense, and salty pirates battling over great riches. Most people tend to view Treasure Island as a story for children, but it can be enjoyed by anyone longing for a rollicking adventure. Like so many stories from the 1800s, each chapter ends with a cliffhanger, and once you get used to the language the author's humor shines through.
2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
By A Customer on Aug. 8 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
What is every teens fantasy? It's running away from home to get away from parents and rules and homework etc. and to have an adventure like Jim Hawkins. After seeing the movie, PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN, for the 3rd or 4th or 5th times teens are going to fantasize more about joining a crew of pirates to have an adventure on the high seas. Only there are no longer pirates like those who lived in the 17th and 18th centuries. But teens like me can escape and have adventures by reading pirate books like TREASURE ISLAND and ROBINSON CRUSOE. (The latter is based on a real pirate named Alexander Selkirk who was marooned on an island. Fortunately a ship picked him up in a short time not years later, and he didn't have an encounter with canibals like Robinson Crusoe.) Treasure Island is slow in places, but there's no law saying a reader has to read the slow parts. I just skipped over them and got to the good parts. I've read parts of other true books about pirates. But the modern day one I liked the best was THE DIARY OF A SLAVE GIRL, RUBY JO. No, it is not dorky. It has a good story with good characters (slave children) who watch Blackbeard as he holds their city hostage. In the back of the book you can see real photos of pirates, jolly rogers, and slave stuff. There is also more information about pirates of that time, and they weren't quite like the ones in the movies. I recommend everyone read Treasure Island, Robinson Crusoe, and that new book.
One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The story of Treasure Island takes place during the glorious 18th century, when seamen still sailed the oceans in search of wealth and fame. The most feared enemies were the sea pirates. Young Jim Hawkins discovers a treasure map in the sea-chest of the murdered pirate, Billy Bones. Jim joins Doctor Livesey and Squire Trelawney to form a partnership to search for buried pirate treasure. The presiding genius of their crew is the one-legged pirate turned sea cook, Long John Silver. Long John is cunning and bloodthirsty, without a shred of conscience. But his buoyant humour and vitality are irresistible. Their sea voyage turns out to become quite perilous when the first rumours of mutiny are being whispered on board of the Hispaniola.
The point about classics such as Treasure Island is that you cannot doubt the relevance of such a book, since it is still popular more than 120 years after it was first published (1883). Hundreds of books following Treasure Island have used the image of the pirate Long John Silver and made it a universal type. Ask anyone to picture a pirate and in nine out of ten cases you will get something closely resembling Long John.
The strongest quality of Treasure Island is that it is still surprisingly fresh. It has a pace that can stand comparison with any contemporary novel. Stevenson did not add a lot of moralising to the story, which is quite remarkable for a coming of age story dated from that period. The character of Long John suffers clearly from a certain machiavellian duality, a topic that will return more prominently in Stevenson's later work: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.
One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
The free download for Kindle of "Treasure Island" is hardly a feature rich edition of the classic, but it does have the most important part, which is the novel itself. Originally the book was serialized in "Young Folks" between 1881 and 1882, but was then published as a book on May 23rd of 1883. "Treasure Island" is a wonderful adventure for younger readers, and has had an impact on popular culture. The popular stereotype of pirates, and buried treasure marked by an X on a treasure map, all comes from this story.

Most of the story is narrated by Jim Hawkins, the son of the owners of an inn, who becomes involved in a mystery involving sailors and treasure, though there are a few chapters narrated by Doctor Livesey, whom Jim looks to as a trusted magistrate. The adventure takes place at some point in the 18th century, though one cannot determine the exact time frame and regardless it isn't important for the story.

This is a great work for younger readers as it is full of adventure and interesting characters, and a young hero in Jim Hawkins. The best known of the characters, though, is Long John Silver. Hired as a cook for the expedition, it is no surprise that Silver turns out to be much more. Silver has much more complexity and depth than any other character in the story, and that is perhaps the main thing that makes the story as engaging as it is. There is no shortage of film adaptations and TV shows based on this work, and though its story is clearly of a time, the enjoyment of reading it is timeless.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse

Most recent customer reviews



Feedback