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Village Of The Damned: Collector's Edition [Blu-ray]

3.7 out of 5 stars 46 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Actors: Christopher Reeve, Kirstie Alley, Linda Kozlowski
  • Directors: John Carpenter
  • Format: Collector's Edition, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region A/1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: R
  • Studio: Shout! Factory
  • Release Date: April 12 2016
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars 46 customer reviews
  • ASIN: B01AB4Y712
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,646 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)
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Product Description

Product Description

A small town's women give birth to unfriendly alien children posing as humans.

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The original 1960 version of Village of the Damned is regarded as a classic of science-fiction and horror, and it remains one of the creepiest movies of its kind. Directed with occasional flair by John Carpenter, this 1995 remake trades subtlety for more explicit chills and violence, but the basic premise remains effectively eerie. In the tiny, idyllic town of Midwich, a strange mist causes the entire population to fall asleep, and when everyone awakes the town physician (Christopher Reeve) discovers that 10 women--including his wife and a local teenaged virgin--have mysteriously become pregnant. Their children are all born on the same day, with matching white hair and strange, glowing eyes, growing at an accelerated rate and raising Reeve's suspicion that they're not of Earthly origin. These demonic brats can control minds and wreak havoc with the power of their thoughts--so of course, they must be destroyed! Only Reeve knows how to get the job done, and his performance (the actor's last big-screen role before his paralyzing accident in 1995) grounds this otherwise superfluous remake with enough credibility to hold the viewer's attention. But for the real chills, definitely check out the original version--it's 20 minutes shorter but twice as spooky. --Jeff Shannon --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
Midwich was a nice, friendly place to live - until one day, the whole town mysteriously falls asleep for a few hours. A while later, the town discovers 10 women are pregnant - including the town virgin, and a wife whose husband was away.
Nine months later - all women give birth, and 9 of these babies survive. But their families (and then the town) soon discover that these are no ordinary little kids - while the white haired, bright eyed kids are quick o develop physically and seem to poses psychic and mind reading abilities, their moral values wish a lot to desire...
While the moral issues arising from this story line do get acknowledged, the writer / director team chose to go for the obvious creeps and thrills from this movie than to go into morality issues too deeply. This is a legitimate persuit, and it is a good movie as a thriller / suspense / horror movie, another production of it (looking into different angles of the story) can remake it and get a completely different result...
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Format: DVD
I saw the original "Village of the Damned" when it was released back in 1960. Being a child myself, I was horrified at those evil little kids with the white hair and the glowing eyes. The inimitable George Sanders and that lovely British horror queen Barbara Shelley starred and it scared the bejesus out of me! Now in the latter part of the 20th century, horror maven John Carpenter remakes it, and along with "The Thing", Carpenter did himself well in making the remakes original in their own rights without sacrificing the mood and feel of the earlier versions. There is an innate eeriness in evil children; one cannot remove one self from realizing that despite all the evil they are doing, they are still children. Christopher Reeve is gallant and controls the nuances of his performance; Kirstie Alley is deliciously over the top in her role as the government scientist who wants to (what else) study the children; Mark Hamill makes a rare appearance as the town's minister, and he gives the role an unusual grace and subtlety to a cliche role; the children all do nicely, as one would expect children to do. Lindsey Haun as Mara and Thomas Dekker as David are especially memorable. However, for me, Linda Kozlowski's performance as Jill, David's mother, commands the essence of futility but firm hope, and makes her the real "star" of the film. Hard to believe she's Crocodile Dundee's woman, in this change of pace role.
The music and cinematography are also supportive.
A GOOD THRILLER.
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Format: DVD
The atypical persona of small town existence is something wondrous to behold, not only for its rustic beauty and the down home hospitality captured within its atmosphere, but also for the potential problems that it might one day face. Sometimes these threats can be as simplistic as livestock wandering the roads and producing traffic woes or two people having a drink-related dispute, making these easy problems to surmount. Other times, however, it can range in the extremities of perplexion, birthed by windfalls of forebodance that carry scents of doom within their stead. In the town of Midwich, for example, that is what is beginning to transpire, with the strangest of the strange is being birthed - quite literally. While much of the community gathers together for a school fund-rasing event, a mysterious whispering fog shrouds one and all, drawing a border around the outskirts of the town itself and making everyone that steps within this outline fall into an unconscious slumber. This ends soon enough, but something oddly sculpted takes place soon afterward; with many of the women in town all becoming pregnant on that freakish day. This sets off a chain of events that threats everyone with woes ranging from governmental bliss, emotionless monsters, and the potential to have something take a little waltz through valleys you sometimes call self-control.
To say this remake of Village of the Damned is without its flaws is something of a gargantuan understatement, because some of the pieces simply do not mesh well and hurt my movie experience therein. One point this is fairly noticeable in is the choice of casting that Carpenter chose to use, and the roles he had them play. I, for one, couldn't buy K. Alley as a government representative no matter what, with her performance lackluster at best.
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Format: DVD
Unless you've been a Carpenter fanatic since the 70s, chances are you've approached his work, like I have, in a roundabout fashion. For most, it all started with HALLOWEEN, then went on to other "can't miss" classics like THE THING and THE FOG. From there we work backwards, finally taking the time to view the ones that casual fans disregard - PRINCE OF DARKNESS, CHRISTINE and finally, VILLAGE OF THE DAMNED.
As most everyone knows, VILLAGE OF THE DAMNED is a remake of a 1960 film of the same name directed by Wolf Rilla and, as with many remakes, critics seem predisposed to prefer the original and trash the revision. While the 1960 original is indeed an effective thriller, Carpenter fans would do themselves a disservice to write this 1995 version off entirely. To do so would deprive one's self of 98 genuinely creepy minutes simply drenched in classic Carpenter chills and atmosphere.
From the well-choreographed blackout sequence early on to the nail-biting finale, the entire film maintains the trademark sense of dread and quiet horror that the finest Carpenter films are known for. In addition, a criminally underrated cast absolutely shines here - from Christopher Reeve proving once again that he was so much more than a one-dimensional Superman to Mark "Don't Call Me Luke Skywalker" Hamill, who easily provides the most intense performance in the film, to even Kirstie Alley, who plays it absolutely straight as a government scientist who knows what's really going on. As in all of Carpenter's finest films, he assembles an ensemble cast that clicks from the start and establishes distinct characters with real personality quickly, adding a depth that many films in this genre lack.
The only downfall to the film are the children themselves.
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