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Violin/Open Market Edition Mass Market Paperback – Jun 1998

4.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback
  • Publisher: Ballantine Books (Mm) (June 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0345424468
  • ISBN-13: 978-0345424464
  • Product Dimensions: 2.4 x 10.6 x 17.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 200 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews
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Product Description

Review

"Enough to frighten even jaded readers. If anyone can make a haunted violin the object of obsession and nightmare, it's Rice" Publishers Weekly "For nearly twenty years now, Anne Rice has been telling stories that share secrets - secrets of life and death, of sex and the soul, of monsters and humans" -- Mikal Gilmore Rolling Stone --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Anne Rice is the author of more than thirty internationally bestselling books including 'The Mayfair Witches' sequence, 'The Songs of the Seraphim' and, most recently, 'The Wolf Gift Chronicles'. The phenomenon that became 'The Vampire Chronicles' started with Interview with a Vampire in 1976, later made into a film starring Tom Cruise and Brad Pitt, and culminated with Blood Canticle in 2003. Prince Lestat is the first new Vampire Chronicle novel for over a decade. Anne Rice lives in California. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback
This Anne Rice book is very imaginative, creative on different levels and aspects, and beautiful in its poetic form. Triana and Stefan are the main characters in this book. Both of them have their own problems they have to deal with, and these problems are not little by any means.
This book is very carefully written. Triana is the first you learn about, and then Stefan's fantastic history is made to light later on in the book. But each character is connected by a perfect violin throughout. Eventually, their pains in life comes full circle at the end with resolve.
Their lives are fantastic and a bit unrealistic at the same time. But that is the gem of fiction. You can make the unrealistic realistic.
Mostly, I did enjoy the inclusion of great past figures like Mozart, Salieri, and even Beethoven. Music is the link between all these characters that are included. The music of a violin.
You might enjoy Triana in all her New Orleans glory and pain, and Stefan in his ghostly state. You might enjoy the descriptive poetry and lavish sights they take you to. Then again you might love the dream state the characters involve you in. Find your love in this book and enjoy your read.
Thanks,
Joy
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
cant go wrong with an anne rice book
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0xa7b617f8) out of 5 stars 13 reviews
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa87f76fc) out of 5 stars A story of a woman that can only be described through music. April 15 2002
By Renee Worthington - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Anne Rice's novel, Violin, tells the story of a woman in New Orleans who is trying to deal with her past and present visions of death. Triana Becker is constantly thinking of the deaths of family and friends that she has endured throughout her life, when she is visited by a mysterious violinist. The dark mood and emotional imagery of life and memories of death mesmerizes the reader. The life of a woman dealing with death and also a new-found happiness is affected by music.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa80888d0) out of 5 stars keeps you guessing whats going to happen next May 12 2003
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
In life, a 19th-century Viennese aristocrat who studied the violin with Beethoven, Stefan Stefanovsky, torments Triana with her lack of talent, then transports her into his own past, where she witnesses his death and hears performances by Beethoven and Paganini. Returning to the present, Triana makes a journey to Brazil where she believes her daughter may be reincarnated.
This is a really excellent story. Once I started reading it I did not want to put it down. I could not be more impressed by a book. It was a book that dealt with all of my emotions. I was very moved by the powerful words she used. Another great thing about the book is it offers something for people of all ages. I myself am young and I couldn't enjoy a book more than I did Violin.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
By Amazon Reader - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This Anne Rice book is very imaginative, creative on different levels and aspects, and beautiful in its poetic form. Triana and Stefan are the main characters in this book. Both of them have their own problems they have to deal with, and these problems are not little by any means.
This book is very carefully written. Triana is the first you learn about, and then Stefan's fantastic history is made to light later on in the book. But each character is connected by a perfect violin throughout. Eventually, their pains in life comes full circle at the end with resolve.
Their lives are fantastic and a bit unrealistic at the same time. But that is the gem of fiction. You can make the unrealistic realistic.
Mostly, I did enjoy the inclusion of great past figures like Mozart, Salieri, and even Beethoven. Music is the link between all these characters that are included. The music of a violin.
You might enjoy Triana in all her New Orleans glory and pain, and Stefan in his ghostly state. You might enjoy the descriptive poetry and lavish sights they take you to. Then again you might love the dream state the characters involve you in. Find your love in this book and enjoy your read.
Thanks,
Joy
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa7d68624) out of 5 stars The ghostly adventures of Anne Rice Aug. 22 2011
By EA Solinas - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
It's only natural for an artist to incorporate parts of their life into their art. And if that life involves pain, the art often becomes a means of working through it.

Unfortunately, that art often becomes a soggy mess of melodrama and plotless meandering. Anne Rice's "Violin" was probably good for her mental/emotional health, and it brims over with genuine emotion... but as an actual novel, it's a big messy hallucinatory disaster. Methinks Anne should have just stashed this away in her desk.

The main character is Triana, a woman whose husband Karl recently died of AIDS. She also seems to have gone insane, since she hasn't told anyone about his death because she wants to cuddle with his dead body. While this is going on, she notices a strange man hanging around her house -- a man with a strange talent for playing Karl's Stradivarious.

The man turns out to be Stefan, a ghost with a connection to the Stradivarius. He and Triana embark on a trip through the centuries, exploring both their lives -- including the death of her alcoholic mother and young daughter. Wow, is this starting to sound like a certain gothic fiction author we're familiar with?

"Violin" is a mess. A big, sloppy, half-decayed, hallucinatory mess that makes you feel like you ate some bad mushrooms. There's not much of an actual plot -- possibly because this was published during one of the higher points of Rice's career, and she could actually get an entire book of morbid Mary Sue ramblings about cuddling with rotting bodies.

And honestly, most of this book is nothing more than that. Rice simply writes about Triana blathering about death and wallowing in the tragedies of her past, and occasionally waxing eloquent about violin music and Beethoven. You end up wishing the woman would just shut up, particularly since she expresses herself solely in run-on sentences of dripping purple prose.

And sometimes she goes into WAY too much detail about things we didn't need to know about, such as her dead mother's used menstrual pad COVERED IN ANTS. Is she trying to induce vomiting, or is that a fun side-bonus?

And Triana doesn't really help either. It's pretty obvious that she's Rice's self-insert, and she's not a very likable one. Not only is she painfully pretentious and self-absorbed, but she's also completely nuts and semi-suicidal. And she comes across as very selfish as well, since she keep Stefan captive in the world of the living because hey, she wants to play the violin.

"Violin" tries to be a ghost story, a paeon to music and an authorial catharsis, but it ends up deteriorating into a big smelly mess.
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa7c48708) out of 5 stars A Ghostly Serenade May 1 2003
By Lee Armstrong - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is an interesting tale, although at times I wanted to stop reading. The first third of the book bogs down a bit as we get long dialogues between Triana Becker and Stephan the ghost. It is a romantic kind of tale. Faced with the death of her second husband Karl from AIDS who left her a wealthy New Orleans widow, Triana lays in bed with the corpse for days lamenting until a mysterious stranger comes to serenade her with the beautiful violin. This is music so gorgeous, that it casts a spell that makes one seem to lose track of time and place. We discover as family comes and goes that the violinist is a ghost who was a pupil of Beethoven and died trying to rescue an especially rare long necked Stratavarius violin. Stephan sees into her mind, brings back memories of loss such as Triana's child Lily, her divorce from her first husband, the death of her alcoholic mother, the disappearance of her much-loved sister Faye, & the recriminations of her sister Katrinka. However, the haunting goes awry as Triana snatches the violin and will not return it. Here, the novel really picks up the pace as we are transported back centuries into Stephan's life in Vienna as the son of a wealthy Russian diplomat who funds Beethovan to educate his son. Triana and ghost Stephan step outside of this world of the past as they see the real-life memory Stephan rescue the violin from his father's burning palace, fight with his father when Stephan wants to study with Paganini, and murder his father after he smashes his fingers with a cane for the son's disobedience. We see Stephan murdered by guards and go through the discovery of his ghostly existence. All of this is punctuated by beautiful dream-like visions of Triana. Apparently, this is a contest of wills between the living and the dead. Triana is victorious and winds up mysteriously transported from her New Orleans home to Vienna, unable to explain the shadowland she has traversed. Triana becomes master of the violin, inherits Stephan's talent for music, and gives concerts globally. She becomes wealthy beyond her already considerable estate. The novel concludes in Rio, which is beautifully described. Ghostly dreams from the first part of the novel are brought into reality in Rio. Rice does a good job of bringing us through the second two-thirds of the book to the final resolution. While the pacing is not completely excellent, there is a lyrical quality to the way Anne describes the power of the music. All in all, this was an interesting tale, a mostly pleasant read. Enjoy!

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