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Walk Forward by [Raskin, Rosa]
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Walk Forward Kindle Edition

5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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Length: 226 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Product Description

Product Description

Hidden secrets are discovered by a member of the second generation in her fifty year search for her sister, Eugenia, lost in the Holocaust. Jewish family members are caught in a hellish spider's web as the "last 500." As pawns in the chess game between Hitler's assistants, they survive the Lodz Ghetto, Auschwitz, Stutthof, the burning city of Dresden, Germany, and are released from concentration camp Theresienstadt. Born in Germany after the Holocaust, Rosie remembers the Displaced Persons' camp on her journey to the United States, as a three-year-old refugee on the troop carrier, the USS General William C. Langfitt. The theme of the book is the importance of family, no matter the time or the place. The true story includes scenes from her family's four years in captivity, and events in the lives of her Christian relatives during the First and Second World War. Rosie's mother, Louise, pictured on the front of the book, was not in the Holocaust, but enabled her husband, a survivor, and post-war family to "walk forward." The purpose of the narrative is to continue to uncover information about her lost sister, and all the children that remain missing, or perished in the Holocaust.

Product Details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 394 KB
  • Print Length: 226 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: Rosa S. Raskin & Associates, LLC (Sept. 25 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B009H6Y7AC
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,005,452 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Format: Kindle Edition
When I began to read this true tale of loss and loyalty, I felt the heartache of a man named Herman Chimowicz who survived the holocaust and returned home without his wife and nine-year-old daughter. I got caught in the story because a wife was assumed dead, and a daughter was not.

During the years after the war while he half heartedly began the process of repairing his life, Herman questioned returned prisoners of the concentration camp in an effort to hear news of his daughter and got none. Herman still refused to have his daughter declared dead.

In the author's desperate attempt to find her biological sister, Walk Forward reads like a long letter to her. She spoke to her of her family, their love for her, their travels, and lineage, while never letting go of the hope that Eugenia was alive. You learn of the carnage and the suffering of World War 2 survivors from this author's personal vantage point built with bits and pieces told to her by her father, and other family members.

The story takes you on the impossible odyssey yet gives a detailed account of the events of one of the most horrific wars in history, from the cattle trains loaded with dying human beings to the death chambers where the terrified, bewildered victims met their dark destinies.

Rosa Raskin leaves no clue unexamined regarding her oldest sisters whereabouts in her intense research where she reports everything, including exact dates of events of the Holocaust in motion - right down to the tattooed numbers on the arms of some of the survivors.

Raskin illuminates the reports of a hell by design, choreographed by a mad man, in striking detail.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3.9 out of 5 stars 29 reviews
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A different "Shindler's List" story revealed Sept. 22 2013
By Jay - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
Walk Forward is the product of the author's life-long effort to search for her older half-sister Eugenia, who became lost during the Holocaust. Rosa's search documents her father's family history, from 1932 to the present., focusing on the years 1939-1945. It documents the history of one Jewish family's experience in Germany and Poland, and the miraculous survival of many family members. The author's search for her sister is ongoing, and Eugenia's fate remains a mystery.

I am the grandson of one of the central characters, Alfred. So, as a history of my parents, grandparents, and extended family, Walk Forward is precious to me. It documents both the horrors my family endured and the heroism my family members displayed. I was unaware of the chronology, and the events that tied the stories together. There was much closure for me reading those pages, which confirmed the events that the elders of my family, who now live across the globe, have recounted. But what about the reader who is not connected to this family? What in this narrative will engage him or her to finish the book? Especially when the first sentence of the first chapter could very well be the last sentence of the epilogue, "Eugenia, if by some miracle you are alive and find this book, please contact me, your half-sister, Rosie." We know ahead of time that the happy ending we wish for has not yet revealed itself. What will the reader learn by reading the pages in-between?

In-between one learns of a family's courage to survive despite daily life-threatening threats in a world at war: The patriarch Jacob's search for a safe haven for his family, his sons' attempts to thwart the Nazi's in order to survive, the older family members' attempt to preserve the world that was changing beyond their control. Like Bible stories, the dramatic events portray moral dilemmas at every turn. They reveal heartbreak and joy, optimism and disappointment. As an untold history, the story of the 500 metalworkers who were granted a reprieve from death will likely be compared to the "Shindlers List" narrative. This is a story of persecution of a people, and today, sadly, there are survivors of too many other holocausts from all over the world who will read the book and be able to relate to the characters in the book. And as a story of hope, the book engages the reader in the universal theme that great struggles lead to great accomplishments, that the spark of humanity within us cannot be extinguished, and that there is reason, every day, to walk forward.
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Walk Forward" An Inspirational Read for Young & Old Sept. 27 2012
By Jon Gould - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
"Walk Forward" is a gripping account of the Holocaust depicting the horrific mental and physical anguish faced during a family's remarkable survival during the Lodz Ghetto, Auschwitz, Stutthof, and the burning city of Dresden. The story is told through the eyes of young Rosie born in Germany after the Holocaust and the family's resettlement in America. Frequent trips to Germany because of her father's restart of the family business in Germany and frequent conversations with parents and extended family during her coming of age and curious searches through a messy drawer archiving the family's Holocaust photos and clippings leads to a captivating storyline inviting the reader into the family circle. "Walk Forward" provides a firsthand account of a Holocaust family's adjustment to life in America and the drama of an endless search by Rosie and family for a missing sister. The author is a gifted writer, story teller and researcher. Her graduate degrees in the biological sciences and information science serve her well. "Walk Forward" is indeed an inspirational read for both the young and old.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Remnants of Inhumanity Feb. 8 2013
By Joanne Mazzotta - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
When I began to read this true tale of loss and loyalty, I felt the heartache of a man named Herman Chimowicz who survived the holocaust and returned home without his wife and nine-year-old daughter. I got caught in the story because a wife was assumed dead, and a daughter was not.

During the years after the war while he half heartedly began the process of repairing his life, Herman questioned returned prisoners of the concentration camp in an effort to hear news of his daughter and got none. Herman still refused to have his daughter declared dead.

In the author's desperate attempt to find her biological sister, Walk Forward reads like a long letter to her. She spoke to her of her family, their love for her, their travels, and lineage, while never letting go of the hope that Eugenia was alive. You learn of the carnage and the suffering of World War 2 survivors from this author's personal vantage point built with bits and pieces told to her by her father, and other family members.

The story takes you on the impossible odyssey yet gives a detailed account of the events of one of the most horrific wars in history, from the cattle trains loaded with dying human beings to the death chambers where the terrified, bewildered victims met their dark destinies.

Rosa Raskin leaves no clue unexamined regarding her oldest sisters whereabouts in her intense research where she reports everything, including exact dates of events of the Holocaust in motion - right down to the tattooed numbers on the arms of some of the survivors.

Raskin illuminates the reports of a hell by design, choreographed by a mad man, in striking detail. She seems to be talking with Eugenia over tea about her father's beginnings while paying testimony to her father's love for his first born, and she does it well. She speaks to the reign of Hitler and how this family of devoted Jews intended to migrate to Israel and while the notion may have saved them, they in turn could not conceive of the horrors that followed their delayed plans until it was too late.

This true story has a way of keeping your attention on one of the millions of families separated from their dreams by Hitler's insanity... You get to know these people and care for them, most especially Herman, the man who survived the worst imaginable while never letting go of his belief that his nine year old daughter Eugenia did too.

Herman did survive but the question remains in the center of his daughter Rosa's book; Did he ever really heal? His daughter Rosie endured her father's legacy and his nightmare when she gave it a voice in her beautiful love letter to her missing sister.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful Memoir & Tribute Nov. 11 2012
By Graciela Sholander - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
Everyone has a story worth telling and hearing. Rosa Raskin's personal story is particularly compelling. She arrived in the U.S. as a child, a young displaced immigrant, and here her family rebuilt their lives after the horrors of the war. Over the years her parents, Louise and Herman, shared stories with Rosa and her sisters, stories of lost relatives and an extended family scattered across the world. Rosa began to write down these stories, and this book is the culmination of her research and findings.

But her personal story is far from resolved as she continues to search for her half-sister Eugenia. Rosa's father had a wife and daughter who were never seen or heard from again after the war, presumably lost to the Holocaust. While he remarried and, with his second wife, created a beautiful family life for their children, he never lost hope that his firstborn would one day reappear. This hope is now carried through Rosa's book, a loving retelling of her family's history and a sincere tribute to a sister she has yet to meet in person.

Rosa's writing takes the reader back to another era. She recounts in detail the good and the bad, capturing in writing the everyday lives her relatives lived along with major events they experienced. Rosa's background is multicultural and multi-faith, not uncommon in a region that's seen borders change so much through the centuries. Her retelling of her parents' pre-U.S. lives is captivating. As you read Rosa's book you can feel the emotions her relatives experienced, and you can feel yourself immersed in a multi-sensory time travel journey.

Walk Forward is more than a personal war and post-war story shared with the world. It's more than the preservation of an important historical account. It is a labor of love, a tribute to displaced families everywhere, and a message of hope that relatives can be found and families can be reunited even after so many years.
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Walk Forward- Recorded Family History Dec 10 2012
By Sharon L. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Walk Forward is recorded family history by Rosa. For that, she is to be commended. She is honoring her family by writing this book.

As far as the writing style, Ms. Raskin gets repetitive often, re-telling stories in the same words throughout the book. It is not a book or writing that would win an A in a writing class but that is not important. Telling her history is.

Well done and honorable Ms Raskin