CDN$ 20.08 + FREE SHIPPING
Only 1 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by BOOK- LAND.
CDN$ 20.08 + FREE SHIPPING
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Walkin' the Dog (G K Hall Large Print Book Series) Hardcover – 2000

3.9 out of 5 stars 26 customer reviews

See all 16 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
Hardcover, 2000
CDN$ 20.08
CDN$ 19.45 CDN$ 5.26
Audio Download, Abridged

Oscars 2018

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
click to open popover

No Kindle device required. Download one of the Free Kindle apps to start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, and computer.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Thorndike Press (2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0783889615
  • ISBN-13: 978-0783889610
  • Product Dimensions: 15.9 x 2.5 x 24.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 617 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars 26 customer reviews
  • Would you like to tell us about a lower price?
    If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

Product description

From Amazon

Once he had dreamed up the Easy Rawlins series, with its colored-coded titles and suave protagonist, Walter Mosley could have coasted for the rest of his life. Instead he delved into impressionistic fiction (RL's Dream) and sci-fi (Blue Light)--and came up with his own variant on Ellison's invisible man, a forbidding ex-con named Socrates Fortlow. The author first introduced this inner-city philosopher in Always Outnumbered, Always Outgunned, allowing him to vault one ethical hurdle after another. Now Socrates returns in Walkin' the Dog, still operating out of his tiny Watts apartment, still figuring precisely what to make of his freedom.

Like his dog, Killer--a spirited mutt who's missing his two hind legs--Socrates has to contend with a number of severe handicaps. Forget the fact that he's a black man in a white society. He's also the fall guy for every crime committed in the vicinity, a scapegoat of near-biblical proportions:

The police always came. They came when a grocery store was robbed or a child was mugged. They came for every dead body with questions and insinuations. Sometimes they took him off to jail. They had searched his house and given him a ticket for not having a license for his two-legged dog. They dropped by on a whim at times just in case he had done something that even they couldn't suspect.
Yet Socrates is no poster child for racial victimization. Why? Because Mosley never soft-pedals the fact that he is, or was, a murderer. "He was a bad man," we are assured at one point. "He had done awful things." Deprived of any sort of sentimental pulpit, Socrates makes his moral determinations on the fly. Should he admit that he killed a mugger in self-defense? Can he force his adopted son Darryl to stay in school? Should he murder a corrupt cop who's terrorized his entire neighborhood? His answers are consistently surprising, and that fact--combined with the author's shrewd, no-nonsense prose--should make every reader long for Mosley's next excursion into the Socratic method. --James Marcus --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

Mosley can readily manage more than one empathetic series hero, and in Socrates Fortlow, introduced in Always Outnumbered, Always Outgunned, he has a winner. Socrates is a former jailbird doing his best to go straight in a seamy Los Angeles full of temptation, and the novel is an examination, as powerfully relaxed as Socrates himself, of how his life works. He lives in a tiny shack in a back alley in Watts, tries to stay out of the way of the ever-suspicious cops, does a little loving (the cheerful sensuality of Mosley's writing about sex strikes exactly the right note), unwittingly acts as a role model for an unhappy teenager and eventually becomes a national symbol for his placard-wielding protest against police brutality. Where some writers would make this the pivot of their plot, it is no more than incidental to this tale, as Socrates continues to go on his quiet, unostentatious way until the fuss dies down. This is a deceptively low-key book that sneaks up on a reader with the realization of how much can be revealed by artfully chosen, dead-accurate dialogue, and how fully a uniquely admirable and always unexpected personality has been brought to life. Time Warner audio; 6-city author tour.
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

See all Product description

Customer reviews

Top customer reviews

August 9, 2000
Format: Hardcover
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
January 8, 2001
Format: Hardcover
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
December 30, 2000
Format: Paperback
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
A customer
November 23, 1999
Format: Hardcover
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
December 22, 1999
Format: Hardcover
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
November 16, 1999
Format: Hardcover
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse

Most recent customer reviews

Where's My Stuff?

Delivery & Returns

Need Help?