Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

War Brothers: The Graphic Novel Paperback – Feb 1 2013

4.5 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 24.16 CDN$ 43.11

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
click to open popover

No Kindle device required. Download one of the Free Kindle apps to start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, and computer.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product Details

  • Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Annick Press; 2 edition (Feb. 1 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1554514894
  • ISBN-13: 978-1554514892
  • Product Dimensions: 17.1 x 1.3 x 24.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 590 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #62,288 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  •  Would you like to update product info, give feedback on images, or tell us about a lower price?

Product Description

Review

“Powerful storytelling based on documented experiences … it’s as relevant as ever …”—Kirkus, 02/13

“A truly important work that is well worth the read.”—School Library Journal, *starred review, 03/13

"… very accurately portrays the criminality of adults who abduct kids to carry out crimes against humanity... This engrossing book … should be read by anyone wanting to know about Kony's LRA."— Lieutenant-General Roméo Dallaire (Retired), international child soldier advocate

“… a challenging, uncompromising work and, in its graphic form, a beautiful treatment of stark ugliness.” —Quill and Quire, *starred review, 02/21/13

“... a powerful graphic novel and a really good read.”—Comic Book Resources, 02/13

“This is the kind of graphic novel everyone should read.” —NetGalley, 02/24/13

“His story has haunted me for weeks.”—School Library Journal, Reaching Reluctant Readers, 03/13

“This is a sorrowful and all-too-true story, but one that ends on a hopeful note.”—Booklist, 04/13

“It’s done with such a delicate finesse that it offers a path to empathy without causing a kid to sink into depression about the implications and possibilities.”—Reverse Direction, 03/08/13

“While capturing the horrific tragedy of the life of child soldiers, co-creators Sharon E. McKay and Daniel Lafrance also manage to offer inspiration: war decimates, and yet everlasting bonds can also be forged.”—BookDragon, Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center, 03/11/13

“As upsetting as this story is—all the more for its basis in the ongoing reality for children still conscripted into the LRA—McKay doesn’t leave readers without a sense of hope.”—Publishers Weekly, *starred review, 04/29/13

“… powerful historical fiction. It is an important story to tell, and this team has done so admirably.”—Sal’s Fiction Addiction, 04/02/13

“Highly recommended, this is a story that is riveting to read as long as you are brave enough to continue turning the pages.”—wakingbraincells.com, 04/19/13

“This is a must for the classroom.”—Canadian Children’s Book News, 04/13

“These components—strong story, powerful storyteller, talented artist—make for a winning combination.”—January Magazine, 05/30/13

“Wow. Intense. Brutal. Moving … exceptional illustrations … masterful storytelling.”—itsallcomictome.blogspot.ca, 05/19/13

“ … a gritty read, graphic in its story premise, in its details, in its reality.”—Canlit for Little Canadians, 06/01/13

“… tells in vivid and harrowing detail the story of children abducted to become soldiers in the Lord’s Resistance Army in Uganda.”—Horn Book Magazine, 07/13

“… contains a powerful message about the redemptive power of hope and the resilience of individuals.”—Reading Today Online, 06/12/13

“The book had clearly moved him [the author’s son], and he was ready to begin thinking about what violence can mean to real-life people—including children.”—huffingtonpost.ca, 07/24/13

“… an unforgettable glimpse into child soldiers’ vivid and painful experiences.”—Unshelved, 07/19/13

“… a great resource to have in any library collection.”—VOYA, 08/13

War Brothers is a truly important work both in the original version and in this graphic novel version.”—CM Reviews, 09/13

“This title would be a great addition to any junior high or high school … Highly recommended.”—Library Media Connection, 10/04/13

“… one of the most powerful graphic novels of 2013.”—Ich Liebe Comics!,11/10/13

“This is poignant. Intriguing. Disturbing.”—Tatal (Teens at the Arlington Public Library), 12/18/13

“… a fine job of making the stories of child soldiers accessible to younger teen readers without making it too overwhelming.” —Amy’s Marathon of Books, 02/17/14

“… tells the story in a sensitive and appropriate manner.”—From the Biblio Files, 03/25/14

“… a great resource to have in any library collection.”—VOYA, 04/01/14

“… not an easy book to read but it is an important book … There is no shame in closing this book now. Please don’t. Read it, and then find someone to recommend it to.”—Guys LitWire, 04/16/14

“It is essential that … teens be aware of what goes on in the world. That it is in graphic novel form makes the story more accessible to youth.”—Libraries and Young Adults, 04/28/14

“Everyone needs to read this book!”—Book Snob, 08/12/14

“… (an) important history lesson as well as exciting page-turner.”—muskokaregion.com, 09/26/14

“… an unflinching and brave look …”—Finding Wonderland, 11/28/14

“With its haunting images and powerful text, this is a story of spirit, friendship, loyalty, and courage.”—Skipping Stones, 01/15

“… a message of hope, courage, family and friendship.”—Literacy, Families and Learning, 02/23/15

“… a powerful narrative, densely layered…”—Professionally Speaking, 06/15

“… one of the best graphic novels I have ever had the pleasure of reading and is highly recommended!”—Lower Columbia Review Group, 06/15

About the Author

Sharon E. McKay is a bestselling, award-winning author. Her books include Enemy Territory and Thunder Over Kandahar. She divides her time between Charlottetown, PEI, and Toronto, Ontario.

Daniel Lafrance is a storyboard and graphic novel artist and has worked as an artist in the film industry for many years. He lives in Toronto.


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
The book War Brothers by Sharon E. McKay is an amazing book that can give you an inside look on an African child solider.
The book follows a child named Jacob who is abducted by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Although Jacob goes through things no child should ever have to, he sticks to his ways of being a child whom never gives up.
Jacob being as brave as he his decides to help break out his friends alongside with Oteka, a teenager who much like Jacob, sees that nothing is impossible if you have hope.
The book has many twists and turns from the time he is abducted all the way through his brutal experience of escaping the LRA’s captivity. It all starts when he is at school with his friends. He is abducted along with his friends and class mates. Through this time he is beaten and forced to do terrible things, however soon Oteka and Hannah come. Hannah is a girl, who much like Jacob, was kidnapped and wants to leave. After getting his brothers together, accompanied by Hannah and Oteka, they make their escape.
I think that this book was intended to be read by older kids /teens because they can see what it is like for kids their age in another part of the world. Although the blood is toned down a bit there are still things not appropriate for younger people and that’s why I think the book is better for older teens about 15-19.
Although this book may seem small it is filled with tones of twists and turns. So don’t let the size fool you because for such a small book it can have a very big impact on your life.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
This graphic novel deals with the very difficult subject of child soldiers. I find the topic both upsetting, and important to share. I think the author did a great job of showing that these soldiers are victims. Even the ones who commit atrocities do so under such duress that they feel they have no other option. That loss of innocence is mourned in the comic and beautifully illustrated through facial expressions and body language. Unlike many graphic novels, this one has a narration that I think of like a voice-over to a documentary. It works for me personally as a reader but I wonder if teens who read more comics that I do would prefer it to be more dialogue based.

I think this is something that could potentially be used in a classroom. It deals with history, social studies, art, and literature. It could spark a lot of discussion. It is mature subject matter, and I can see young teens becoming upset as they read it. I got emotional and frightened as I did. This is the point though, and I think it is essential that Canadian teens be aware of what goes on in the world. That it is in graphic novel form makes the story more accessible to youth, and I was relieved it wasn’t as gory as I feared while maintaining the serious nature of the story.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
By now you know the spiel; I received this book through a GoodReads giveaway. Even though it was free I'm not above giving a crushing review to a free book. As further preamble, I don't seek out to read graphic novels but I will look at anything put in front of me, so here we go.

As I said in the intro, I'm not a comic books sort of reader in general so right off that puts me at a bit of a disadvantage. I don't have a whole lot to compare this to. In simple terms it was about a 45 minute read even with the distraction of pedaling an exercise bike the whole time. Being a comic book it's very easy to read and very accessible. The illustrations were well done, dark and foreboding. That fits well since the topic was itself so dark and foreboding. So as graphic novels go, absolutely no complaints at a technical level.

The content, as you have no doubt surmised from the publisher's description, surrounds the conscription of young men by Ugandan rebels. Written from the perspective of a young man who is a victim of this conscription, it does tend to tug at your heart strings. In the U.S. there's not a lot of awareness that this sort of thing goes on so I applaud the book for introducing this hitherto untold story to domestic readers. It tells the story in a heart-felt way but left me as a reader rather wanting more information. The graphic novel genre only supports so much throughput so this isn't an especially surprising eventuality.

To sum up, an interesting story told in far too brief a format. I wanted more data but what was presented was fairly intriguing. Not the most amazing thing I've ever read but certainly a 45 minutes well spent.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
By Nicola Mansfield HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on May 20 2013
Format: Hardcover
Wow. Intense. Brutal. Moving. I have not read the YA novel this graphic has been adapted from, in fact, I'd never heard of it before not exactly being my type of YA reading. However, I do enjoy this type of material presented in the graphic format and this book caught my attention right away. The art is phenomenal and I was drawn into the story right away with the exceptional illustrations of the jungle and Ugandan life. It is really difficult to use a word like "enjoy" was describing how one felt about a book which deals with such a sad reality as child soldiers. There was nothing to "enjoy" in this story, except for the masterful storytelling which kept the humanity in the children who had been turned into brutal killing machines; that managed to show the deep faith of the people that may waver but comes back stronger in the end even when the rebel soldiers use God against the children to brain wash them into thinking they are fighting and killing for God. The book is a testimony to how religion does not start wars but how people use religion as a tool in their wars. Uganda is 84% Christian, which is common in African countries and this strength of faith is evident in the survival of the main characters and their healing afterwards.

The story is harsh and brutal but not graphic in visual detail. It will be dependent on the reader whether they can handle the reality of the material. If they can, I highly recommend this for ages 10 and up. The main characters range in age, but the main group is 12-14. An extremely important subject for western children to be made aware of when they are mature enough to handle it and this is the book that might just make an impact on their outlook. Powerful.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x9cd17ccc) out of 5 stars 15 reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9d24a864) out of 5 stars Powerful and worth reading Jan. 7 2014
By Travis Starnes - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
The book has a powerful message, one which is non-spoilerish. The entire book can be boiled down to this epilogue:” Where does the victim end and the criminal begin? Whom do we punish? Who is accountable? What happens when the child becomes an adult and continues his path of destruction?” This is all the book is about, seeing what is done to those children, how they are broken and twisted by the actions of others into inhuman killers. In time they will start the cycle again by abducting other children to enslave as soldiers, assuming they survive long enough. Are they to blame though? Do the adults in this book who take those children away bear all the guilt and need punishment for those crimes, or were they themselves merely continuing on the cycle that someone else started for them? It is a powerful message and made all the more poignant by the fact that this is all based on real accounts, so while the story itself is a fiction the events that are depicted are all real.

I would never chose to read a book like this and I will never read one by choice again, but it is definitely something that is worth reading. I have said similar sentiments about stories like the Crow and the Last of us, but while they are works of fiction and powerful in their own right, the fact that this is true (to a point) makes this all the more important. I cannot recommend this book, either as a comic or as a story because I did not enjoy it on either level. What I can say is that if you want to show someone a comic that breaks the mould and proves that comics are not for kids, then this is it. If you are interested in the subject or wish to read something that is not merely a throw away superhero story then this might be the book for you. For me, it is one of those stories that I simply wish to forget, but probably never will.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9d24a8b8) out of 5 stars 45 Minutes well spent March 6 2013
By The Mohawked Reviewer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
By now you know the spiel; I received this book through a GoodReads giveaway. Even though it was free I'm not above giving a crushing review to a free book. As further preamble, I don't seek out to read graphic novels but I will look at anything put in front of me, so here we go.

As I said in the intro, I'm not a comic books sort of reader in general so right off that puts me at a bit of a disadvantage. I don't have a whole lot to compare this to. In simple terms it was about a 45 minute read even with the distraction of pedaling an exercise bike the whole time. Being a comic book it's very easy to read and very accessible. The illustrations were well done, dark and foreboding. That fits well since the topic was itself so dark and foreboding. So as graphic novels go, absolutely no complaints at a technical level.

The content, as you have no doubt surmised from the publisher's description, surrounds the conscription of young men by Ugandan rebels. Written from the perspective of a young man who is a victim of this conscription, it does tend to tug at your heart strings. In the U.S. there's not a lot of awareness that this sort of thing goes on so I applaud the book for introducing this hitherto untold story to domestic readers. It tells the story in a heart-felt way but left me as a reader rather wanting more information. The graphic novel genre only supports so much throughput so this isn't an especially surprising eventuality.

To sum up, an interesting story told in far too brief a format. I wanted more data but what was presented was fairly intriguing. Not the most amazing thing I've ever read but certainly a 45 minutes well spent.
HASH(0x9d24acf0) out of 5 stars Everyone should read this book! Aug. 12 2014
By Laura Booksnob - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
War Brothers. The Graphic Novel by Sharon E. McKay
Artwork by Daniel Lafrance

War Brothers is based on true events about Kony and the LRA (Lords Resistance Army) and the kidnapping of children to conscript into their army of child soldiers. Told from the perspective of a child named Jacob, who lives in Uganda and who was kidnapped from school with his classmates.

War Brothers takes you through Jacob's harrowing journey into the forest and into the indoctrination of a child soldier. He watches his best friend succumb and kill innocent people for if he doesn't, he wouldn't be allowed to eat. Jacob protects a boy younger than him and constantly thinks about escape and the love of his father. He holds hope close to his heart to survive the nightmare that has become his life.

Jacob's story mirrors the story of so many children in the world today. Kony is still out there, stealing children and making them into soldiers and needs to be stopped. Young women kidnapped ultimately become slaves, or brides and are used for sex. Punishments for running away or not following orders are severe and many times, death sentences.

The artwork in War Brothers is stunning. The pages and panels vary from light pastel when things are going well for Jacob to pages that are dark and full of bold colors when Jacob is suffering. While this is a hard book to read because of the subject matter, the artwork is compelling and well-done and contributes to the power of the story.

There are so many issues in the world that need our attention and the issue of Child Soldiers should be at the top of the list. Child and soldier are two words that should not go together in our enlightened world.

Everyone needs to read this book!
HASH(0x9d2190cc) out of 5 stars A bleak yet humane story Feb. 25 2013
By Lakis Fourouklas - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This graphic novel is one of those special books that act like a punch-in-the-stomach when it comes to the story that they have to say. And the story at hand is one of war and hatred, ignorance and blind belief, hurt and retribution. There's so much agony, and so much pain contained in these pages, that can make a tender or simply human soul feel sick.

The subject matter of War Brothers is bleak, as it tackles one of the most important issues of our so-called modern era: child soldiers. As we read, at the moment, there are more than 250,000 of them, fighting and dying in 35 countries around the world, a number that could be far larger, since the cases of children that go missing and end up with arms in hands is not actually too well documented.

Anyway, to come to the story, this book describes the adventures of Jacob Kitino, a member of the Acholi tribe and resident of the city of Gulu in Uganda. Jacob, who comes from a rich family, studies at the local seminary for boys and just loves to play football. The civil war that ravages his country is very distant to him, a reality that only the other people have to live through. His best friend is Tony, a boy with a great sense of humor, who loves football as well. Let's read what he has to say: "The nuns who are paying for my schooling told me that if I fail it is because I am an ungrateful boy. But if I pass it is God's work and I should repay God by becoming a priest."

Becoming a priest is not something he really wants to do, but he doesn't want to be a soldier either. However, fate has already made its plans for him, as well as for many other the boys, as one day the Lord's Resistance Army rebels attack the school, and take 38 of them as hostages. They are to become soldiers, or die, unless they can be used otherwise.

So Jacob and Tony, all of a sudden, find themselves marching through the jungle towards a yet unknown destination. The journey is long, and exhausting, their strength, as they are practically famished, seems to slip away from them by the day: "I need to rest, but to rest is to die," Jacob says.

This long and tiresome journey will change their lives forever, and not for the better. They'll see heinous crimes committed in the names of country and god, they'll make friends and create enemies, and they'll see that their future is something they have to shape themselves. What they don't know yet is that victims and perpetrators, when it comes to situations like these, are treated by the people in almost the same way; a veil of doubt and suspicion covers them both.

War Brothers is a disturbing story told in a deeply humane manner. The words and the illustrations convey convincingly to the reader all the thoughts and emotions of the main characters, and they bring to life their dreams and fears, their resolutions and failures. I'd highly recommend this exceptionally good graphic novel to simply everyone who gives a dime about the world around him.
HASH(0x9d2191b0) out of 5 stars it wades into the horror of child soldiers April 2 2013
By Mary Lavers (in Canada) - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I have not read Sharon McKay's 2008 YA novel, War Brothers, so I can't compare the graphic novel version to the original. Like the original, War Brothers--The Graphic Novel tells the story of child soldiers in Joseph Kony's Lord's Resistance Army in Uganda, this time with illustrations by Daniel Lafrance to add a new dimension to the characters.

I discussed this book with my partner Mike (he reads a lot of comic books and graphic novels). Here's what he had to say:

"A pretty good story. A little safe - only one of the main characters has to kill, and they manage to escape together. There's even a little deus ex machina in the jungle. Not bad for younger readers - it wades into the horror of child soldiers and the LRA. It's fiction, and it feels that way. Weird to say, but feels a bit "Feel good story", even given the topic. The feeling of guilt and belief that everyone was afraid of them as killers was well done."

He also mentioned how much he liked the fact that the illustrations were somewhere between typical graphic novel images and children's book illustrations. They were almost cute, or they would have been if the subject matter hadn't been so horrifying. It added to the feeling that these children's childhoods were being stolen from them by being forced into children's armies.

Disclaimer: I received a digital galley of this book free from the publisher from NetGalley. I was not obliged to write a favourable review, or even any review at all. The opinions expressed are strictly my own.


Feedback