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Fox Western Classics (Rawhide / The Gunfighter / Garden of Evil) [Import]

4.5 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Actors: Tyrone Power, Susan Hayward, Gary Cooper, Gregory Peck, Helen Westcott
  • Directors: Henry Hathaway, Henry King
  • Writers: André De Toth, Dudley Nichols, Frank Fenton, Fred Freiberger, Nunnally Johnson
  • Format: Box set, Black & White, Color, DVD-Video, Full Screen, Widescreen, NTSC, Import
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 3
  • MPAA Rating: NR
  • Studio: 20th Century Fox
  • Release Date: May 13 2008
  • Run Time: 272 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews
  • ASIN: B0014BQR1A
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Product Description

Product Description


Genre: Westerns
Rating: NR
Release Date: 13-MAY-2008
Media Type: DVD

Amazon.ca

Numerous films have used The Gunfighter as a title, but if you're looking for the film classic of that name, this is the one. Gregory Peck followed his powerful performance in Twelve O'Clock High (also for director Henry King) with an arguably even stronger portrayal: Jimmy Ringo, celebrated shootist just stepping into middle age and mortally weary of having to defend his legend every time he turns around. His trail takes him to a small town where an old comrade, Mark Strett (the great Millard Mitchell), now serves as marshal, and where Ringo's estranged wife and the son he has never seen also reside, under an assumed name. Over one night and one day, hoping against hope, he dares to dream of a normal life. But there are avengers not far behind, and other threats yet to be counted.

Although critically praised, The Gunfighter was a box-office disappointment. Darryl F. Zanuck blamed the soup-strainer mustache Henry King had Peck grow for the role, but perhaps the film's virtues of intelligence and restraint weighed against it. The Gunfighter properly deserves the credit (awarded to High Noon two years later) for ushering in the "adult Western," that '50s subgenre that emphasized psychological intensity over action and spectacle. (Most of The Gunfighter unfolds at the Palace Bar where Ringo waits for his family to be brought to him.) In any event, latter-day audiences should have no trouble appreciating the solid performances, literate writing, and impeccable Fox craftsmanship, including the final studio assignment for ace cinematographer Arthur Miller. --Richard T. Jameson --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: VHS Tape
20th Century Fox presents "THE GUNFIGHTER" (1950) (85 min/B&W) -- Starring Gregory Peck, Helen Westcott, Millard Mitchell, Jean Parker, Karl Malden & Skip Homeier

Directed by Henry King

In this classic noir-influenced Western, Gregory Peck stars as aging gunslinger Jimmy Ringo, sick of killing but haunted by punks wanting to make a name for themselves by slaying a legend. After being warned by his old friend the Marshal Mark Strett (Millard Mitchell), Ringo decides to return East to see his estranged wife and the child he left behind. Knowing his death is an inevitability if he stays, Ringo leaves but before he can reach his destination his past catches up with him in the form of a young outlaw.

Oscar Nomination for Best Writing, Motion Picture Story (William Bowers & André De Toth!)

Special Footnote: -- Large painting on wall behind Gregory Peck's chair in bar room is "Custer's Last Fight", painted in 1884 by Cassily Adams and reproduced as a lithographic print by Otto Becker from Adams's original painting. These prints were distributed in 1896 to bars and taverns all over America by the Anheuser Busch Company.

The Gunfighter was often imitated by other Westerns, most notably by High Noon (1952) and its minimalist, morally difficult, and compelling tale made it one of the most important films produced in the 1950s.

BIOS:
1. Henry King (Director)
Date of birth: 24 January 1886 - Christiansburg, Virginia
Date of death: 29 June 1982 - Toluca Lake, California

2. Gregory Peck (aka: Eldred Gregory Peck)
Date of birth: 05 April 1916 - La Jolla, California
Date of death: 12 June 2003 - Los Angeles, California

Mr. Jim's Ratings:
Quality of Picture & Sound: 4 Stars
Performance: 5 Stars
Story & Screenplay: 4 Stars
Overall: 4 Stars [Original Music, Cinematography & Film Editing]

Total Time: 75 min on DVD ~ 20th Century Fox ~ (11/04/2003)
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Format: VHS Tape
Gregory Peck in The Gunfighter, plays Jimmie Ringo, a lanky Texan acknowledged to be the fastest gun in the West. The trouble is that Peck has grown weary of having to prove his mettle time and time again. He is headed home to Cayenne to reunite with his wife and young son from whom he has been estranged for eight years.
Along the dusty trail, he stops to rest and quench his thirst at a saloon, where he is soon recognized by the locals. While minding his own business he is coaxed into a gun duel with a young, snotty and irksome Richard Jaeckel. Jaeckel unfortunately wins the silver medal in that battle. Word gets out and Peck is soon stalked by Jaeckel's three brothers.
Peck slows the brothers down by scaring off their horses on the route to Cayenne. This gives him a small window of opportunity to convince his wife to re-establish the family. He arrives in town and learns that the town marshall is none other than his old partner Mark Strett played by a sympathetic Millard Mitchell. Peck refuses to leave town until Mitchell brokers a deal to allow Peck to meet with his wife and son. The movie ends in the only way that these kind of movies could possibly end in 1950.
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Format: VHS Tape
THIS IS THE FILM THAT 'HIGH NOON' ASPIRED TO BE BUT FAILED.
AS MUCH AS I LOVE WESTERNS AND AS HIGHLY AS I REGARD GARY COOPER, 'NOON' JUST DIDNT CUT THE MUSTARD, BUT PECKS 'GUNFIGHTER' DID.
NO, BY TODAYS STANDARDS THIS CLASSIC PROBABLY IS PERCIEVED BY SOME AS SLOW, INDOORSY AND TRITE. BUT THIS IS ONE YOU HAVE TO WATCH WITH YOUR HEART.
PECK IS AN AGING GUNMAN WHO REGRETS HIS PAST AND IS PUSHING TOWARD A FUTURE THAT HE HOPES WILL INCLUDE HIS WIFE AND SON. HIS WIFE IS A SCHOOL MARM WHO GOES BY AN ALIAS FOR OBVIOUS REASONS. AND THE BOY DOESNT KNOW THAT THE CELEBRATED OUTLAW IS DEAR OL, DAD. BUT AS PECKS CHARACTER ATTEMPTS TO ARRANGE A FAMILY REUNION, THE FAMILY OF A MAN PECK WAS FORCED TO KILL IS HOT ON HIS TRAIL. THEREIN LIES THE KIND OF SIMPLISTIC PLOT THAT GREAT WESTERNS ARE KNOWN FOR.
AUDIENCES IN 1950 DIDNT CARE FOR PECK'S MUSTASHE AND THE FILM WAS NOT OVER PATRONIZED.
THIS MOVIE IS FOR THE INTELLIGENT, THINKING VIEWER WHO IS MORE INTO THE CHARACTERS THAN THE ACTION.

THE CHARACTER OF MARSHAL MARK STRETT IS EFFECTIVELY PORTRAYED AND THE DIALOGUE IS QUALITY AND GENUINE.
THIS IS MY PERSONAL FAVORITE OF THE OFFERINGS BY GREG PECK, AND GIVEN THE OVERALL QUALITY OF HIS WORK I THINK THAT SAYS A LOT.
FROM WHAT I UNDERSTAND THIS WAS ALSO PECKS FAVORITE SELF WORK AS WELL.
IN THE FINALLY PECK'S GUNMAN IS AMBUSHED BY A YOUNG PUNK LOOKING TO CASH IN ON THE VETERAN'S FAME. THE MARSHAL WANTS TO SEE THE BOY HANG BUT THE DYING GUNFIGHTERS LAST REQUEST IS TO LET THE KID GO ON BEING A "BIG TOUGH GUNNEY" SO THAT THE MISCREANT CAN LIVE A LIFE OF PAIN AND MISERY AWAITING HIS OWN UNTIMELY END.
THIS LITTLE FILM ADEQUATELY TELLS THE STORY THAT SO MANY OTHERS ATTEMPT TO BUT DONT QUITE GET IT DONE. AT ANY RATE 'THE GUNFIGHTER' IS AN ENTERTAINING PLAY THAT UNFORTUANTELY WAS FAR AHEAD OF ITS TIME.
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Format: VHS Tape
Wow. One of the best westerns I've ever seen, that's for sure. Everything about this film is spot-on perfect, from the cinematography and acting to the costuming, sound, blocking and general attention to detail... not to mention the script! Gregory Peck stars as Jimmy Ringo, the fastest gun in the West, now turning to middle age, and ready to give up the life of a violent roustabout. The trouble is, of course, that everywhere he goes, people know and fear him, and every would-be badman in the territory wants to knock him down a peg or two. It's an old story, repeated in numerous pulps, films, dime novels and comicbooks over the years, but probably never as tersely and tensely as here. Honestly, there's not a false or flat moment in this film; director Henry King delivers a mournful masterpiece, and Peck is stunning in his role as a weatherbeaten, tired old gunny who'd gladly chuck it all in, if it weren't for the burdensome reputation he'd spent his entire youth building. Fans of the "Lonesome Dove" series should recognize the imprint of Jimmy Ringo, and his erstwhile pal, now the town marshall, Mark Strett (played perfectly by Millard Mitchell), two old-timers who know that the hard life isn't really as glamourous as most folks think. Highly recommended.
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