FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
What to Eat has been added to your Cart
+ CDN$ 6.49 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Ships from the USA.Please allow 2 to 3 weeks for delivery. A copy that has been read, but remains in clean condition. All pages are intact, and the cover is intact. The spine may show signs of wear. Pages can include limited notes and highlighting, and the copy can include "From the library of" labels or previous owner inscriptions. Millions of satisfied customers and climbing. Second City Books - the first place to look for second hand books.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

What to Eat Paperback – Apr 17 2007

4.3 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews

See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 18.78
CDN$ 11.83 CDN$ 0.80

Back to University 2016
Save on College Prep Essentials on Amazon.ca. Shop now
click to open popover


Frequently Bought Together

  • What to Eat
  • +
  • In Defense of Food: An Eater's Manifesto
  • +
  • Food Rules: An Eater's Manual
Total price: CDN$ 48.02
Buy the selected items together

No Kindle device required. Download one of the Free Kindle apps to start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, and computer.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product Details

  • Paperback: 624 pages
  • Publisher: North Point Press; 1 edition (April 17 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0865477388
  • ISBN-13: 978-0865477384
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 3.5 x 22.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 748 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #50,928 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  •  Would you like to update product info, give feedback on images, or tell us about a lower price?

Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

According to nutritionist Nestle (Food Politics), the increasing confusion among the general public about what to eat comes from two sources: experts who fail to create a holistic view by isolating food components and health issues, and a food industry that markets items on the basis of profits alone. She suggests that, often, research findings are deliberately obscure to placate special interests. Nestle says that simple, common-sense guidelines available decades ago still hold true: consume fewer calories, exercise more, eat more fruits and vegetables and, for today's consumers, less junk food. The key to eating well, Nestle advises, is to learn to navigate through the aisles (and thousands of items) in large supermarkets. To that end, she gives readers a virtual tour, highlighting the main concerns of each food group, including baby, health and prepared foods, and supplements. Nestle's prose is informative and entertaining; she takes on the role of detective, searching for clues to the puzzle of healthy and satisfying nutrition. Her intelligent and reassuring approach will likely make readers venture more confidently through the jungle of today's super-sized stores. (May)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

Nutritionist Nestle's newest volume aims to help the American consumer determine what best to eat to improve or to maintain good health. Pursuing what she hopes is a unique and beneficial approach, she surveys a supermarket on a food-by-food basis, noting for each category what nutritional benefits are claimed and what really are the advantages and dangers in consuming any grocery offering. She documents how food industry concerns have perverted nutritional and origin labeling, dismayed that economics has once more trumped open information. She assesses the roles of trans-fats in processed food, methylmercury in fish, calcium in dairy products, salmonella in fresh eggs, sugar in cereals, and genetic modification. Nestle is particularly concerned that consumers understand all the implications, good and bad, of the perennially contentious "organic" label. Although the honest, prudent scientist in Nestle precludes her providing glib prescriptions or half-true advice on eating, she does present very helpful shopping guidelines for consumers determined to be vigilant about their food. Mark Knoblauch
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

See all Product Description

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
5
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
1
See all 6 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Marion Nestle packs a lot of information into this one book. She takes you on a tour of a typical grocery store and explains to you the difference between products, and whether or not they are worth the price. This is only one book on the topic of what someone should eat, and like all topics, I think that it is important to read as many books as possible and then form your own conclusions.
3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Marion Nestle teaches nutrition at New York University, so her approach is objective, systematic, and unbiased. She does not favor any one way of eating, but rather untangles various food debates/misconceptions with facts.

She explains, for example, that 'organic' means absolutely nothing in the seafood industry, whereas in the meat industry it means: no animal by-products fed to animals, no antibiotics/hormones, and more humane-appearing conditions for raising animals. Then she explains that most supermarkets tend to carry "natural" (a VERY different thing) rather than 'organic' meats due to USDA's partnerships (specifically in the meat industry, but not in the fruit and vegetables industry!) with industries it regulates.

In other words, "What to Eat" dispels a lot of misconceptions, and untangles a lot of conflicting information about the North American food industry. Marion Nestle doesn't seem affiliated with any particular lobby group, as she really does appear to be impartial, as well as clearly qualified for the job.
7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I really appreciated Marion Nestle's approach in this book. The facts and studies she presented were always done so with a good dose of common sense, and her writing style makes for a very interesting read. The one thing that might bother some Canadian readers is that this is American book, so the politics, stores and studies are American, but I felt I was able to appreciate the information anyway. I highly recommend this book to anyone concerned with what they're eating - and why.
2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse


Feedback