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What Right?: Graphic Interpretations Against Censorship Paperback – Nov 1 2002

4.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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Paperback, Nov 1 2002
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Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Arsenal Pulp Press (Nov. 1 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1551521377
  • ISBN-13: 978-1551521374
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 1 x 26.7 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 399 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,779,121 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

About the Author

Robin Fisher is a comic activist, a girlfriend, a cat owner, a radio dj, a friend, a writer, an occasional student, and a voracious reader. She lives in Vancouver.

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Top Customer Reviews

this is a collection of graphic interpretations on how censorship does nothing beneficial for society. it discusses mostly the censorship of books and ideas through that medium, but some of the comics just deal with the censorship of ideas themselves, or the way in which ideas are expressed. overall i'd say it's a good collection of comic strips speaking against censorship.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0xa09b7f78) out of 5 stars 2 reviews
HASH(0xa0bb0600) out of 5 stars A brave and diverse collection. April 30 2005
By J. Glover - Published on Amazon.com
The benefit for Little Sister's Defense Fund catalysed following the persecution of a Vancouver bookstore in the 1980s. But the array of talent commanded by this commission shines alone and intersects collectively, each to be a series of embryonic cartoonic zeitgeists in utero... drivels someone somewhere.

In What's Right, Talbot's superb cover of a masked skull scissoring a book into confetti is matched by many clever and funny cartoons including the brilliant salvo against banality Fetus-X by Eric Millikin and Casey Sorrow. In Boneyard by Richard Moore, cartoon porn-stars find their language bleeped by the general nemesis. Yes you've guessed - it's that poxy and voyeuristic Canadian law. What's Right is the more thoughtful of the two books, resulting sadly in a lot of didactic strips of pontificating characters amidst a few gems of political lampooning. Still it's all stuff good enough to cause much more scratching of foreheads (and trouser pockets) down at the Canadian Customs offices, and the various bureaus behind the persecution of the Little Sister's Book & Art Emporium in Vancouver.

In the sister volume, What's Wrong? Explicit Graphic Interpretations Against Censorship, the quality of the talent , storytelling and graphic, are of a higher standard than What's Right?, the latter focussing on the moral side of the debate. Richard Moore's A Bet's A Bet stands out for it's drawing, with your next door animal-guy types getting it on. Art laurels too go to Robin Fisher and Donald King's Vespa Erotica, a girl's daydream of the erotic possibilities to be had by owning a two wheeler. And Creepy Snuff Porn by Howard Cruse, which is equally cute and violent. Union Dues by Taylor gets special mentions for their graphics. Fancy Pants by Michael Noonan is direct enough to be as real as life. In Satan's Free Country, a boy has his mind blown and is seduced by the Lord Pan. Dave Coopers Cartoon Abominations is a brilliant take on Crumb-influenced portraits of comedy mutants.

Should what's right and wrong with them enter into it when the project comes with such political credentials? I would say so. As political cartooning it is disarming just enough to avoid polemics, working best as simple tales of people, couched in a long array of never less than distinctive talents. Whatever you view of the politics of thoughtcrime - and if you can find the time for strips desqueamished, deheroised and humanly intense - then this book or it's companion volume should belong to you.
HASH(0xa0840c84) out of 5 stars it was ok Sept. 6 2008
By elfdart - Published on Amazon.com
this is a collection of graphic interpretations on how censorship does nothing beneficial for society. it discusses mostly the censorship of books and ideas through that medium, but some of the comics just deal with the censorship of ideas themselves, or the way in which ideas are expressed. overall i'd say it's a good collection of comic strips speaking against censorship.


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