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Who Goes There? Hardcover – Aug 5 2003

4.2 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Buccaneer Books (Aug. 5 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9780899667348
  • ISBN-13: 978-0899667348
  • ASIN: 0899667341
  • Product Dimensions: 22.4 x 14.8 x 2.2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 181 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #705,273 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

Review

Every single one of these seven stories is pure science fiction gold, not only standing the test of time after 80 years but simply inspired works of fiction. Anyone really interested in science fiction should read this collection and see how it's written by the very best. -- Anthony Jones SFBOOKREVIEWS blog --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Born in New Jersey in 1910, John W. Campbell studied physics at MIT and then Duke University. By the age of 18 he was writing science fiction, and was a recognised name in the genre by the time he was 21. He died in 1971. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Before you buy "Who Goes There?" by John W. Campbell Jr., you should first consider "A New Dawn: The Complete Don A. Stuart Stories" by the same author. It contains all the works of short fiction that are in this book, and it includes 9 more, as well as two articles. The price of "A New Dawn..." is just a little more than the cost of this book. As for this printing of "Who Goes There?", it is well put together; the binding and paper are high quality. They could have done a better job in proofreading though, as there are several places where there are missing letters, or spaces that appear in the middle of a word. It does not occur so often as to make it a big problem, but I found it to be noticeable.
This printing, from Buccaneer Books, is a reprint of the 1948 book of the same name. It contains seven short fiction pieces originally published in "Astounding Science Fiction" between November of 1934, and August of 1938. They were originally published under the pseudonym Don A. Stuart. This collection was tied for 13th with four other books on the Arkham Survey in 1949 as one of the 'Basic SF Titles'. In addition, on the 'Astounding/Analog All-Time - Book' polls in 1952 and 1956 it was rated 5th and tied for 13th respectively.
John W. Campbell (1910-1971) was undoubtedly best known as the editor of "Astounding Science Fiction" from 1937-1971, but he also wrote quite a few books and short fiction pieces along the way. This collection includes perhaps his best known stories: "Who Goes There?", "Twilight", and "Night".
"Who Goes There?" is the classic story of a group of scientists in Antarctica who discover an alien who was frozen there millions of years ago.
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By EA Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on Feb. 22 2014
Format: Paperback
Shameful confession time: I have never actually seen John Carpenter's sci-fi/horror movie, "The Thing." But I have read John W. Campbell's classic novella "Who Goes There?", which the movie is based on -- a lean, dialogue-heavy novella that is brimming with paranoia and uncertainty. Even the reader won't know who is what.

A team of scientist in Antarctica discover a strange alien craft, buried in the ice for millions of years. After they accidentally destroy the craft, they find a frozen alien creature and take it back to the base -- only to discover that it's not truly dead. When the ice thaws, the creature vanishes out from under their noses.

But soon the scientists discover that the creature is very much alive -- and even worse, it can absorb and mimic living creatures perfectly. Nobody on the base is free of suspicion, and they must find and kill every part of "the thing" before it has a chance to spread across the Earth. If they don't, all life is doomed.

"Who Goes There" is a story with no padding -- every character has a reason to be in the story, and every scene ramps up the intensity and paranoia. It's kind of top-heavy with dialogue (there are several scenes with just people hanging around asking, "What should we do?") but at least the dialogue is all necessary.

And Campbell does a brilliant job with the simple plot, slowly building up the sense of suspense and paranoia -- one person goes nuts and hides in a room singing hymns, while others just lie in their bunks and throw up. It especially helps that this is a third-person narrative, so even the READER doesn't know who is an alien and who isn't.

Campbell also errs on the side of leanness when it comes to the characters.
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Format: Paperback
I have to say that I came to this novella "Who Goes There?" by John W. Campbell by seeing it on the credits of one of my favorite 50's Sci-fi movies with James Arness, "The Thing from Another World" (1951). Of course the movie had to stay true to its time and was loosely based on this story it still stands as a great presentation of its own. In 1982 John Carpenter took it on himself to add a few more of the original elements of the story. Unfortunately he had to bow to the gooey gory monster era and missed much of the original story including the fact that our antagonist was able to read minds and project thoughts. Not to distract from the two movies but it would be nice if someone tried again to portray this story. Carpenter also leaves his movie with an excellent potential for a sequel "Two things are better than one".

We find that thousands of years ago a rocket crashed and was buried in the Polar Regions. It was found due to a magnetic disturbance. On extraction there is an accident. We find a being from another world and another time. The being has powers of deception and shape shifting. Yet the story is not really of supernatural beings as it is of the people and their relationship to each other. As with many great mysteries it is always the last person you suspect. That is one of the strong points of Sci-Fi, not the technology as it will come about soon enough; what it is really about is how we deal with our fellow humans under duress.
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Format: Paperback
I have to say that I came to this novella "Who Goes There?" by John W. Campbell by seeing it on the credits of one of my favorite 50's Sci-fi movies with James Arness, "The Thing from Another World" (1951). Of course the movie had to stay true to its time and was loosely based on this story it still stands as a great presentation of its own. In 1982 John Carpenter took it on himself to add a few more of the original elements of the story. Unfortunately he had to bow to the gooey gory monster era and missed much of the original story including the fact that our antagonist was able to read minds and project thoughts. Not to distract from the two movies but it would be nice if someone tried again to portray this story. Carpenter also leaves his movie with an excellent potential for a sequel "Two things are better than one".

We find that thousands of years ago a rocket crashed and was buried in the Polar Regions. It was found due to a magnetic disturbance. On extraction there is an accident. We find a being from another world and another time. The being has powers of deception and shape shifting. Yet the story is not really of supernatural beings as it is of the people and their relationship to each other. As with many great mysteries it is always the last person you suspect. That is one of the strong points of Sci-Fi, not the technology as it will come about soon enough; what it is really about is how we deal with our fellow humans under duress.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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