5 used & new from CDN$ 18.99

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Wild One [Import]

4.0 out of 5 stars 36 customer reviews

Available from these sellers.
1 new from CDN$ 43.79 4 used from CDN$ 18.99


Product Details

  • Actors: Marlon Brando, Mary Murphy, Robert Keith, Lee Marvin, Jay C. Flippen
  • Directors: Laslo Benedek
  • Writers: Ben Maddow, Frank Rooney, John Paxton
  • Producers: Stanley Kramer
  • Format: NTSC, Import
  • Number of tapes: 1
  • MPAA Rating: UNRATED
  • Studio: Sony Pictures
  • VHS Release Date: Sept. 26 1997
  • Run Time: 79 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 36 customer reviews
  • ASIN: 6303402089
  •  Would you like to update product info, give feedback on images, or tell us about a lower price?

Product Description

Amazon.ca

This is the original motorcycle movie, starring Marlon Brando as the brooding leader of a biker gang that invades a small town. The film always looked like one of those synthetic Hollywood ideas of subculture life in the 1950s, which means it looks even more artificial today. But it is an actor's piece more than anything, and toward that end Brando's performance really is an important one in the context of his revolutionary reinvention of film acting during that decade. Directed by Lásló Benedek (Namu, the Killer Whale) and produced by the socially conscious Stanley Kramer. --Tom Keogh

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I received a wrong DVD which was hard to return = and took so many weeks to do so because of my disabilities, age and weather. This movie was shown without appropriate warning that it was workable only in region **-**- which I don't recognize anyways. Be very cautious when ordering. I am now fearful of ordering any more.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: DVD
I would have to agree with other reviewers that this film is rather corny, but for its time it was revolutionary. Throughout the film I must admit I had several laughs with lines such as, "You're too square" and "Anybody thinks their too good for me, I knock 'em over sometime". And phraseology such as "that's corn ball style". And Brando's faux black accent put me in mind of a 1970's blaxploitation movie, especially with the continual use of the word "jive". Nevertheless, Brando's deliverance is awesome, everything from his facial expressions and gestures to his timing is perfect. The man is stunning in this film. It's hard to take your eyes off of him, but then again, why would you want to?!! Highly recommended!
One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: DVD
The "bikers" are like Broadway show extras. The dialogue is embarrassingly unauthentic. Believe me, nobody outside of 42nd Street ever talked like that, daddy-o. The story plays out like some kind of "B" Western with a horse shortage. The "town" even looks like a Western set made over for what somebody in Hollywood thought might be a new genre. There's a café and a saloon rolled into one and a gal working there to catch the eye, and a town posse and a jail and a sheriff (father of the gal) and some "decent citizens" turning into vigilantes, and instead of outlaws we have "hooligans." The bikers do everything but tie their bikes up to the hitching post after roaring into town as though to take over.
Okay, that's one level. On another level this should be compared to Rebel without a Cause (1955) as a mid-century testament to teen angst. Or to Blackboard Jungle (1955) with the fake juvenile delinquency and the phony slang. Marlon Brando as Johnny Strabler, whose claim to fame (aside from being the leader of the pack) is that he stole a second-place biker trophy, stars in a role that helped to launch his career, not that his acting in this film was so great. (He was better in half a dozen other roles, for example., as Stanley Kowalski in A Streetcar Named Desire 1951, or as Terry Malloy in On the Waterfront 1954). What stands out here is his tough-guy vulnerability with women: the irresistible little boy playing big. In one sense, this is, despite all the men running around and the macho delirium, something very close to ladies night out. It's a period piece love story, as delicate as a teenager's heart.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: DVD
after reading the reviews of other viewers i had to respond. both marlon brando and lee marvin were great but to cut into it saying it came short of reality or truly portraying it, think when this film was made. im sure in the twenty first century the movie would be very different. anyone thats read hunter thompsons 'hells angels' or has other knowledge of bike gangs knows too well of its truth-inspired influences of hollister. but in 1953 film makers as well as anyone else including the literary crowd had its limits even if limitary. i think alot of those who reviewed it did so forgetting this fact. no its not the best film made but for what its worth it was a great performance by both marvin and brando and served as a pretty entertaining picture on all fronts. i believe this was the intention of the director. it doesnt claim anywhere to be a documentary or anything close so dont interpret it as so. i got the feeling from reading the reviews that the viewers were taking this picture into comparison with contemporary films which it is certainly not one nor is it as one review suggested a film to be viewed for those in a "classic film phase". its beyond that. perhaps im out of line but these are my thoughts at the moment.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse
Format: DVD
For indepth plot analysis, check out some previous reviews. Most everyone knows who the characters are and what this flick is about. But it all boils down to the fact that this is a pretty square picture, made by a bunch of squares, all trying desparately to be hip and capture the essence of something entirely new and elusive, which was Beat coolness, crossed with postwar veteran angst.
The original event that this is (loosely) based on, a motorcycle rally in Hollister, CA in 1947, is very misunderstood and little known outside of biker circles. But there was a sea change underway in the American psyche - one could almost say that the 60's started there, as much as anywhere. "The Wild One" tries to capture this notion, but this film has a very tone deaf quality to it. They all know the words, but they can't carry a tune.
The one shining star here is Lee Marvin, who is (as usual) so perfect it's scary. It's like he wandered onto the set from another picture being made next door, or something, so clearly does he outclass the rest of the pack. He is worth the price of admission, and is the perfect portrait of the disillusioned WW2 vet out to By God enjoy a little of the freedom for which he endured so much hell.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Report abuse

Most recent customer reviews




Feedback