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Wings Audio Cassette – Audiobook, Jul 4 2003

4.7 out of 5 stars 22 customer reviews

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Audio Cassette, Audiobook, Jul 4 2003
CDN$ 23.95
CDN$ 23.95

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Product Details

  • Audio Cassette: 1 pages
  • Publisher: Tellastory; Unabridged edition (July 4 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0552140074
  • ISBN-13: 978-0552140072
  • Product Dimensions: 10.6 x 1.3 x 14 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 118 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars 22 customer reviews
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Product Description

From School Library Journal

Grade 5-9-- The last book of a science-fiction trilogy about four-inch beings who were stranded when their scout ship crashed to earth 15,000 years ago. Truckers (1990) introduced Masklin, leader of a dwindling band of nomes hunting among the hedgerows in modern England. Completely ignorant of their origins, they are guided by a small black box they call "The Thing," which turns out to be a very powerful computer. In Diggers (1991, both Delacorte), they join a group of department-store nomes to live in a quarry. In this last installment, Masklin and friends sneak aboard the Concorde and head for Florida. Their mission: to place The Thing on a communications satellite so it can rouse their waiting mother ship. Nomes are foolishly courageous, companionable, literal and innocent creatures whose repeated misunderstandings confirm readers' sense of smug superiority. The bad puns generated by their mistakes in language may amuse some readers but annoy others. Neither as complex nor interesting as Mary Norton's "Borrowers" (Harcourt) or the Lilliputians of T. H. White's Mistress Masham's Repose (Berkley, 1984), Pratchett's creatures enact a blatantly obvious parable of broadening horizons. Yet the conversational style and fast-moving plot make this cheerful, unpretentious tale useful where there is a need for accessible science fiction, or where the previous volumes have been enjoyed.
- Margaret A. Chang, North Adams State College, MA
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Kirkus Reviews

In book three of the ``Bromeliad,'' the nomes recover their spaceship and leave Earth. At the end of Diggers (p. 109), Gemma and the other nomes, trapped in a quarry surrounded by hostile humans, were saved by the appearance of an enormous spaceship. Wings is a flashback in which Masklin, Grunder, and Angalo sneak aboard a Concorde bound from London to Miami and make their way to within hailing distance of the space shuttle so that Thing can subvert its communication ports to summon their spaceship, which has been stored on the moon for thousands of years. In the process, they meet a band of wild nomes and are told that the world harbors thousands more. Gemma and Masklin leave for the stars; Grunder stays behind to communicate with humans and the other nomes. There is something a bit affected about naming a series after an orchid that harbors a colony of tiny frogs that leave their flower only when they outgrow it. Norton's Borrowers were entrancing, resourceful, and convincing; in comparison, nomes are naive, clumsy, and unlikely. Wings is resolutely earthbound, and while Pratchett can be wildly funny in his adult books, he seems tentative here. Still, young readers who liked the earlier volumes will want to read this one. (Fiction. 10+) -- Copyright ©1991, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback
This was the first of Danielle Steels books that I ever read. I instantly fell in love with her books. I can totally relate to Cassie and her love for an older man (Nick), for I have found myself in the same situation. Cassie was a women who was way ahead of her time. She showed strength and courage that many women of that time would not have. She made it through so much the loss of a brother, a close friend, her marriage and almost herself. And still she pined the whole time for Nick. I was so made at him when he said he could love her cause he had nothing to give her and he was too old for her. Apparently no one told him that age is a number and love is sometime enough. By the end of this book when Cassie goes to England i just knew she would find Nick. By the last page i was in tears for she had finally gotten what she had wanted all this time Nick the love of her life. I want to give this book to my man friend whos says hes to old for me! Love prevails and takes flight on Cassie and Nick's Wings!
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
I have been reading Danielle Steel's books for over 15 years now. Sometimes they do get a bit "all the same" with most of the characters being important, successful, beautiful people who live in "stately homes" and wear "important jewels and furs". Sometimes I think the characters are more about what they have then who they are. Despite this, I always enjoy her books - they are easy to read, romantic and make you forget about everyday life for a couple of hours while engrossed in the book. Personally I think her earlier books are more enjoyable and get more involved in the characters than some of the later books she This book is one you will really enjoy - the main character is Cassie and she is so confident in herself that you just want to be like her. Stands up to everyone and still is a lovely person. Highly recommended.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
A novel that takes place at the turn of the century and follows one young woman's progress as the history of airplanes and aviation becomes popular in the early 1930's. This is not the best Steel has written. For one thing, it's horrendously repetitive. This is a novel for when you are very distracted and need to be reminded constantly of plot details. This is a novel for when you are not looking for anything too deep and heavy.
The edition I read was a very repetitive 631 pages in large print. Steel obviously did research into the beginnings of aviation and airplanes and anyone who is interested in the history of air, flights, and transportation will enjoy this, provided you keep in mind it is very long and the writing doesn't have much depth.
The closest author I can compare this story and Steel's writing to, is Fern Michaels. If you like author, Fern Michaels's plots and writing style, you will like "Wings" by Danielle Steel.
Steel was, apparently writing more lengthy and involved novels back in the mid 1990's. I just wish the writing wasn't so cliched and repetitive.
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Format: Paperback
Wings is the third and final volume of the Bromeliad (following Truckers and Diggers).
Masklin, Gurder and Angalo have just left the quarry and are heading to the airport in hope to go to Florida, where they can put the Thing on a space shuttle so that it can call the Ship. Following Grandson Richard, 39, they board the Concorde.
What somewhat surprised me with Wings is that it's not only the conclusion to a tremendous adventure: the story really gets a level deeper, as the relationship between the nomes and the Thing develops. And don't worry, you still get those hilarious puns such as the one about frogs who have "such a tiny life cycle it still had trainer wheels on it"!
The Bromeliad trilogy is a gripping story, extremely funny and easy to read, but it's also a story about how the world around you can always amaze you if you only look a bit further than just at your direct neighbourhood. I highly recommend it to both children and grown-ups alike!
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
when i was 15 i couldnt get past the first 10 pages. Now, im 17 its my senior year and i had to read a book. i pulled out Wings again, and discovered how wonderful it was. I was reading every chance i got. My mom was very happy too! =o)
I like how Danielle Steels books take place during something big. With Wings, the big event was the bombing of Pearl Harbor, and when the first woman tried to fly around the world. i liked this book, because i could really feel what Cass was feeling whenever she would talk or think, or spend time with Nick. ive never been a fan of the airplanes. but this book made me think differently. i loved the love story. Read it!
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By A Customer on Dec 25 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This was one of the best stories that were ever written by the hand of a talented female author. The book takes place right after World War I and during World War II. The main characters, Nick Galvin and Cassie, are well developed and always were attracted to each other and fall in love, no matter how much Nick protests to it because he feels to old to do so and for her. The villain is cunning, ambitious, and hateful enough to want to ruin whatever happiness that both characters have. As one of Danielle Steel's fans, I want you to read this terrific novel and enjoy it's love story, historic events, and learn how women were treated in those times.
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