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4.5 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
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Product Details

  • Audio Cassette
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0788704508
  • ISBN-13: 978-0788704505
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews
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Format: Paperback
The fifth and strongest entry in Harvey's Charlie Resnick series is less sensational on the procedural side than previous outings, focusing on two separate sets of armed robberies. One set does a good job of portraying a bullying wayward youth and his aimless follower, while the other very high-end, hitting banks and armored cars, and is rooted in Resnick's past. Harvey effectively cuts back and forth between the present and 1981 in order to show the past events and characters. As usual, the private lives of the police squad is further developed.
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Format: Paperback
This book is so much better written than 99% of the genre that it seems a pity to criticize it. However... there is a problem. The author uses characters' consumer choices as little labels. One person eats a Linda McCartney meal, another listens to Lionel Ritchie. You can't help but feel that he is laughing at them. Not so Resnick who has impeccable taste. Near the end a bad character hops into bed with a Jeffrey Archer novel. It is then you realize that he is damned.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0xa1f57654) out of 5 stars 5 reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa1f257b0) out of 5 stars Wasted Years July 29 2008
By Gloria Feit - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Detective Inspector Charlie Resnick is an introspective man, and in this entry in the series he is retrospective as well, being drawn back to events that transpired variously in 1969, 1981, 1992 [at which point he had been a `career copper' for twenty years]--back to the years when he first met his wife when they were both in their mid-twenties, to the time six years later when she asked him for a divorce; from robberies that happened in the past to a string of brutal robberies happening in the present; to crimes whose perpetrators are once again at large and a matter of his concern.. As the book opens four robberies have taken place, the amount of violence escalating with each.

Charlie Resnick is a wonderful protagonist--A man who loves jazz [references to Ella Fitzgerald and Duke Ellington and the like abound], he owns four cats named Dizzy, Miles, Bud and Pepper [how could you not love it?], and the title of the book is itself taken from the lyrics of a jazz tune that haunts him. He has not yet gotten over the breakup of his marriage. He speaks of replacing some furniture with other second-hand pieces, "something older, broken in, the shape of other lives already impressed into the upholstery." The book is at its heart a police procedural, but also a character study of Charlie and those who work with him, now and in the past, and whose paths cross his.

This is the fifth Inspector Resnick novel, and Bloody Brits is owed a debt of gratitude by those outside of the UK who have loved his novels but been unable without difficulty to find them - they have or are about to publish the sixth through ninth in the series. [The newest, and the first one in ten years, has recently been published as well.] And a wonderful thing that truly is. The book is highly recommended.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa1f55474) out of 5 stars Best of the Series Aug. 24 1999
By A. Ross - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The fifth and strongest entry in Harvey's Charlie Resnick series is less sensational on the procedural side than previous outings, focusing on two separate sets of armed robberies. One set does a good job of portraying a bullying wayward youth and his aimless follower, while the other very high-end, hitting banks and armored cars, and is rooted in Resnick's past. Harvey effectively cuts back and forth between the present and 1981 in order to show the past events and characters. As usual, the private lives of the police squad is further developed.
HASH(0xa1f92090) out of 5 stars Another page turner! Feb. 7 2014
By mary taylor - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
John Harvey is a consistent 5 star author to me. His books are page turners - crime stories which appeal to me because he writes of events which are realistic and has at the centre a protagonist who is sympathetic and believable. I read a lot of books in this genre but few authors seem to be able to write well about those who commit the crimes and those who must stop them, John Harvey gets it right every book.
Personally I hope there are many more books to read about the policeman who has become one of my favourites.
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa213a03c) out of 5 stars Better than 99% of the genre, but not perfect Sept. 10 1999
By Andrew Sherman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book is so much better written than 99% of the genre that it seems a pity to criticize it. However... there is a problem. The author uses characters' consumer choices as little labels. One person eats a Linda McCartney meal, another listens to Lionel Ritchie. You can't help but feel that he is laughing at them. Not so Resnick who has impeccable taste. Near the end a bad character hops into bed with a Jeffrey Archer novel. It is then you realize that he is damned.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0xa240df90) out of 5 stars More people should be reading and reviewing this series March 21 2014
By Booker G - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
"Wasted Lives" is an important book in the Charlie Resnick series because the author goes back in time (as well as being in the present of 1992) to fill his readers in on events that affected Charlie deeply in the past. In particular we get to see Charlie's first meeting with his future wife Elaine, and we also follow along as he experiences the deterioration of his marriage in 1981, something that he can't let go of from the very beginning of the series.

It is also interesting to see what Resnick was like in his early years in uniform (1969) and then early on in CID. His relationships with fellow cops at that time, which affected his future also, included one good friend who was discouraged with being a cop in Nottingham and also the self-serving cops that he closed down the bars with despite his dislike of their violent and illegal ways of treating suspects and solving crimes.

The plot starts in the past when Resnick was in uniform and regularly visited jazz clubs. He particularly liked one local singer and knew who the members were in the most popular band, including the drummer who shows up in an investigation in present time. Also in present time a bank robber who threatened Resnick with a shotgun when arrested is being released after years in prison, and he has a connection with the jazz club too. The two cases collide and collude to take Resnick back into his past during his investigations and present Resnick with time for reflection that he doesn't really desire.

Harvey writes very serious mysteries. He gets in the minds and lives of the bad guys, which generally is very unpleasant and unsettling. He portrays their lostness--no job, no future--as part of the problem, but doesn't let them off the hook. In this book it was good to see one loser quit drinking and take responsibility. Still, I would prefer if Harvey spent less time in the mind of the bad guys and told more about what's happening to Resnick's co-workers, who don't get enough space in the book.

As far as the writing of this book is concerned, the technique of going back and forth in time works OK. I do find Harvey's writing style difficult to read at times, however, because he writes sentences that stretch the rules of grammar and clarity. He also tends to use so many British colloquialisms and slang terms. Nonetheless, his writing is very compelling. He also depicts places and characters well. Resnick is a good character with personal issues and also with specific traits that make him who he is, such as his sloppiness in eating. It is mouthwatering to read about the sandwiches he concocts, and it is fun to learn Resnick names his cats after jazz greats, eg, Dizzy for Dizzy Gillespie and Miles for Miles Davis. His concern about proper policing makes him a character one can like also.

For more mystery series that may entertain you, check out my website describing and reviewing many series (see my Amazon profile for the URL).

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