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on September 9, 2003
William Faulkner is one of the most celebrated and popular authors in all of American literature. With his widespread popularity, and stature within the literary world, a book such as this needs to be in print. The book basically picks up everything -- or nearly everything -- of Faulkner's that had not been published up to that point, including: short stories that were later made into novels, short stories published in various fiction magazines that were never collected in a previous Faulkner anthology, and Faulkner stories that had never before been published anywhere. Some of the first group are nearly identical to the books of which they would eventually become a part -- The Unvanquished; The Hamlet; Go Down, Moses; Big Woods; and The Mansion -- but some are radically different. The alterations made to these stories offer a fascinating peek into Faulkner's writing process. They also offer a taste of some of Faulkner's novels, and, thus, work well as a sampler: the reader can read these stories and see which of the novels he or she might like to subsequently pick up. The previously uncollected stories contain some real gems and are eminently worthy; also, only the most hard-core Faulkner reader will have read them before. The previously unpublished stories are not of a significantly lower quality, as one might expect; indeed, some of them are very good -- just as good, or better, as some of the published stories. In any case, they constitute a goldmine for the Faulkner reader. The same goes for the book as a whole: though this certainly does not contain his best work, it contains much that is very good, and everything else is worthy -- perhaps some are even superlative. To be sure, some stories are of less worth than others, but they are all vintage Faulkner, and this is an essential volume for both Faulkner fans and scholars.
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on April 17, 2000
Although I have not read all of his short stories, I find Faulkner's tales to be poigniant reflections of American life, without being overtly obvious in their symbolism. The reader draws as much, or as little, as he wishes from Faulkner.
Being a work of 'uncollected' stories, it does not have the consistency as, say, These 13, or others arranged by Faulkner, but it does have its gems.
Consider it the "B-side" to a great album collection, some of which you may otherwise never have read, but worth it read, nonetheless.
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on November 16, 2016
Over 50 years ago I was a naive 17 year old who was entering his first year at university. As per usual, all students in the physical sciences were required to take a survey course on English literature. One of the required texts was Faulkner's novel "The Sound and The Fury". like many readers I was baffled by this book. The opening Bengy section made no sense to me. Despite the efforts of a diligent and insightful professor, a major result of this course was a conviction that the works of William Faulkner were beyond me. This conviction lasted through my life and modulated my interest when I read a Turner Classic Movie listing for the movie "The Story of Temple Drake". The listing noted that the movie was based on a Faulkner novel. I watched the movie and enjoyed it and tried to reconcile my experience of the movie with my experience, as a 17 year old, of "The Sound and The Fury". Google informed me that teh novel that the movie was based on was "Sanctuary" and so I ordered it from Amazon out of curiosity.

I read "Sanctuary" and found it thoroughly enjoyable. I quickly read "As I Lay Dying", "Light in August" and Absalom Absalom". I found that I understood Faulkner's technique. yet, it was more than comprehending his style, it was understanding how rewarding it was to enter the novel and the personalities and situations of the characters through his style. Faulkner's mysteries allowed one, me anyway, to participate in the actions of the novel and so better understand what was going on. With this experience, I resolved to do two things. One was to re-read all of the texts that had been assigned in that long ago survey course under Professor Wiebe, naturally, I wondered what I had missed in that course and whether I would be better able to appreciate literature after almost a lifetime. Secondly, I resolved to read anything and everything by Faulkner. I read "The Sound and The Fury" and the Bengy section made sense to me. The Quentin suicide section exemplified for me the power of Faulkner's elliptical. Style. I read all of the novels over this summer and have now stated on the stories. I’ve purchased the collected and uncollected stories and "Knight's Gambit"

The "Collected Stories" of William Faulkner are as one would expect uneven, at least for me. Some like "Two Soldiers", I found imaginative and affecting. Others like "Mule in the Yard" and "My Grandmother Millard" are variations on sections of published novels. There is a group of stories that reflect the early history of Yoknapatawpha County which is only hinted at in the novels. Of these, "A Justice" is notable since it attempts to portray people living in a culture whose norms are different from modern Western culture and mostly succeeds.

I found the stories to be enjoyable and instructive. As a sociological note, the racial consciousness revealed in the stories is quite different from that of today. Faulkner describes the pervasive racism as one would expect. yet there is more, People are defined by their race first. They are white or Indian or black before they are human beings they interact in that way. Today, at least in the ideal, society has moved beyond this and people are human beings first with race as only a secondary and limited aspect. The stories are interesting in themselves and also as a window to how society has changed in the last 50 to 100 years

Perhaps now I can understand why that force for good required all physical science freshman to take an English literature survey course
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on December 20, 2001
The first Faulkner book I read was in my junior year of high school. When I consulted my teacher about whether I should choose Faulkner or another author to read, she told me something along the lines of, "Faulkner's regionalistic and enigmatic style is interpreted two different ways by two different types of people: One think that he is symbolic and profound, the other think that he is not and rather full of it." Well, I do feel sorry for the 'other' group, because to not reconize the depth behind his more-poetic-than-most-poets words is just plain out wacky. I will say that he is not your typical fiction writer, his books do not have action oriented plots (or even any action in some cases), but he still somehow manages to catch your interest. I have never fell asleep while reading a book or story by Faulkner, and not many authors have earned this distinction. He also leaves you with a sense of reflection, again something distinguishing him from many others. Personally, I prefer short stories to novels, I find that my focus to the point and plot of the story is less distracted by the end as with a novel and I typically find that I retain more. I do enjoy Faulkner's novels and have read quite a few, but this collection of short stories is just brilliant beyond brilliant. His words are potent and sharp in all of them, even if his point and meaning is more elusive. I completely and totally recommend that everyone read this collection of stories. Everyone. Really. That means you too.
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on November 23, 2004
"That Evening Sun" and "A Rose for Emily" alone could easily seal this remarkable writer's reputation, but the other stories that appear are equally wonderful. Like THE COMPLETE SHORT STORIES OF HEMINGWAY, this collection is a must for anyone interested in the great art form of short stories-although the Hemingway could said to be the direct opposite as far as style is concerned. I first read some of these Faulkner stories in high school, and now, revisiting them decades later I find them to be even better. Fine writing really does get better with age. Another collection of short stories I recently came across is also excellent: THE CHILDREN'S CORNER by the author Jackson McCrae. Excellent with some having shades of Faulkner.
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on July 31, 2000
William Faulkner's work has influenced many writers. His extravagant language and quirky stories are the epitome of fiction. Having read this amazing collection of short stories, I have no doubt in my mind that Faulkner was a very interesting person -- I would've loved to meet him.
My favorite story is "A Rose for Emily"; the quirkiness and symbolism in the story is both beautiful and strange. I also like "A Bear Hunt," "All the Dead Pilots," "Wash," and "Two Soldiers" -- all of the stories have a very unique language. If you like good literature, I strongly suggest that you read this amazing book.
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on June 2, 2004
Of all the Faulkner stories, "A Rose for Emily" is my favorite. For me it is the encapsulation of all that Faulkner is about--Southern Gothic, well-told, paced just right, and with an element that only someone having "lived" in the south could attain. Along with Welty and O'Connor, he takes his place among the Southern greats. Each of these stories is masterfully crafted---little jewels really. Anyone interested in great writing must read these. Would also recommend Jackson Tippett McCrae's "The Bark of the Dogwood--A Tour of Southern Homes and Gardens" and the collected stories of Flannery O'Connor.
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on June 23, 1999
A terrific introduction to the world of Faulkner's fiction. Some of these stories "Wash", "Barn Burning", "All the Dead Pilots", and "That Evening Sun" serve as introductions to some of the characters that populate his novels. These 42 stories encapsulate a brilliant career, featuring a wide variety of styles and points of view.
I am not a big fan of short stories, but each of these reads like a mini-novel.
You will be engrossed and will want to go back and read them again.
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on June 23, 1999
A terrific introduction to the world of Faulkner's fiction. Some of these stories "Wash", "Barn Burning", "All the Dead Pilots", and "That Evening Sun" serve as introductions to some of the characters that populate his novels. These 42 stories encapsulate a brilliant career, featuring a wide variety of styles and points of view.
I am not a big fan of short stories, but each of these reads like a mini-novel.
You will be engrossed and will want to go back and read them again.
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on January 3, 2000
William Faulkner is not an easy Man to understand in his writings but in his complexity he shows strength, admiration and guilt all wrapped up in one sentence and as a reader...all at one time. The confusion and glory is one to beholdin. All of his words put together bring understanding to anyone's compromise. Faulkner is the master of great prose in an educated and complex way.
A writer to be treasured with a devotion likened to Shakespeare of modern time. Sharon lin andrews navarro
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