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on November 29, 2015
This book broke my heart. It must have taken incredible perseverance and hard work to do the research but I am grateful to the author for his painstakingly documentation of the horror that was the residential school system. There are lessons to be learned from this book. What struck me most, beyond the obvious tragedy of it all, was the recurring pattern of people KNOWING what was happening, alerting the authorities, and then nothing being done to remedy the situation. Meanwhile children were living in desperate unhappiness--generation after generation of children as the rest of society around them went on with their lives, aware, but managing to put the suffering of others out of their minds.
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on May 30, 2008
Milloy captures the story of residential schools in a detailed review of Government of Canada documents. The story is shocking.... the Canadian federal governments role in trying to assimilate Aboriginal children is clearly stated as are the numerous documents confirming that the government knew about the prolific deaths and abuses of Aboriginal children in these schools as far back as the late 1800s and did almost nothing to stop it. There is no doubt about it... the tragedy of residential schools was not an accident - it was a planned strategy on the part of the Government of Canada to eliminate Indian children.

This book also highlights some great Canadian heros who joined with Aboriginal peoples to bring attention to the tragedy of residential schols like Dr. PH Bryce who wrote the report the book is titled after "A National Crime" in 1922 saying that one in two Aboriginal children were dying in the schools from preventable disease or S.H. Blake, a leading human rights lawyer, who claimed Canada brought itself into "unpleasant nearness to manslaughter" when it ignored Bryce's report.

For Canadians,students and human rights advocates interested in preventing ongoing human rights abuses perpetrated by governments, including our own, this is a must read!
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on October 6, 2011
I am a non-aboriginal person who wanted to know what really happened to many First Nations children of Canada. It was sickening. I'd read a few pages and would have to stop as I was overcome with anger, shame and sadness. It took weeks to get through the horrors revealed in this book. Canada will never be the same for me.
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on November 21, 2011
Very in depth resource that is written at a University level of understanding. Isn't really a tool to base lessons from, but is an excellent resource to use to supplement understanding.
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on February 23, 2013
Gift. Recipient enjoyed it. Shipped quickly without problems. An interesting commentary concerning the history of First Nations dealings with the governments of Canada and the US and how the current situations came about.
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on October 24, 2014
This is a crime and Harper is continuing to target First Nations with his Racist policies.
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on May 16, 2014
Topic and information is great but it is not well written and difficult to read. Hard to get through the whole book.
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on December 29, 2015
Not a happy read but well written history of our treatment of our indigenous peoples
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