countdown boutiques-francophones Learn more scflyout Home All-New Kindle Explore the Amazon.ca Vinyl LP Records Store sports Tools Registry

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
240
4.8 out of 5 stars
Format: LP Record|Change
Price:$25.00+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on June 2, 2003
...I'm heard this
album for the first time at local radio station in the midnite weekend of the year 1998 and for some reason they played the whole album. One day at year 2001 i saw this album in a local record store at imported cd price in very limited stock and i thank God for hearing my pray. ITS ONLY TOOK ONE WEEK AND THE ALBUM WAS SOLD
OUT. Until now its impossible to find this album in any Indonesian record store. And i'm glad that i'm the only few hip-hop fan inIndonesia whose able to cop the real album. (Mine is German's 2000 release). When i heard this album in the radio, i knew that was Wu Tang Clan cuz I already had their second album Forever. I don't know before what their first album sounds like and for the rest more than 50 minutes,i got my ears glued to my radio speaker. By the time the album is over, i can't close my jaw, i've been shocked and i can't believe wit what i've just heard. The album sounds like demo tape but it works carrying the terms of rugged and raw what hardcore rap should serve and done. The spirit contains in this album like fire that had been set up on an gas station, its start with a song called "Bring the Ruckus" which is quick to take you to the
introduction of the album and followed with "Shame On The *igga" that shows how filthy and sweathy ODB's style is, and then GZA solo's "Clan In The Front" which tag him as the best lyricist among others members (can i say rapper's rapper) Every members came out with their own unique distinctive style that easily draw to your ears. Jusk check out Master Killa line on "Da Mistery Of Shadowboxin' " ,
...BR>
The rest others song it works like magic spell in your ear which makes you wanna bang your head to the wall just like GZA said at his line in "Wu Tang 7th Chamber" ,
"I came down with phat tracks that combine and interlock
Like getting smashed by a cinder block
Blaow! Now it's all over
*iggaz seeing pink hearts, yellow moons
orange stars and green clovers "
Its don't need to argue that this album is get down as one of the 5 best album in history of hip-hop and should be on every true list of every honest hip-hop fans. This is what you get if you put one of the best producers of all time (RZA) and eigth full talented MCs into one album = CLASSIC (Collectively Laboured As Something Should In Collection)
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on January 18, 2001
I know I really don't need to write a review of "Enter the 26 Chambers," but I just felt like giving props to one of the greatest hip-hop collectives in the known universe. Whether you like the current incarnation of the Wu or not, you can't deny that this album changed the face of hip-hop and brought much-needed respect back to the East Coast. RZA's demo-style baroque beats, gritty samples and ragged-but-right mixing (to this day no one knows if those finger-snaps are SUPPOSED to be off-beat like that) got a whole coast open, and the MCs just killed it.
"Ghostface/Catch the blast of a hype verse/My glock burst/Leave in a hearse/I did worse..."
Ghost kicks off "Bring Da Ruckus" with determination, which continues through the entire course of this short but to-the-point album. 14 tracks (12 actual songs) that emphasized the MC. And all of the MCs here get their turn to shine. Ol' Dirty tears up the horn-draped loop of "Shame On a Nigga," Raekwon gets his turn on the money anthem, "C.R.E.A.M.," and of course, Method Man rolls solo on the hyped-up "M.E.T.H.O.D. Man."
But the posse cuts are usually the tightest, evidenced by the stellar "Wu-Tang: 7th Chamber," which appears twice, once as a bass-heavy remix at the end of the disc. Lyrical darts like "I be that insane nigga from the psycho ward/I'm on the trigga/Plus I got the Wu-Tang sword/So how you figure/that you can even f*** with mine?/Hey yo RZA/Hit me with that s*** one time" are sprinkled all throughout this album, keeping anyone nodding their head for days at a time.
There are a couple tracks that are less than spectacular, but they don't take a whole lot away from the album. "Tearz" is a little boring, but RZA's constant melodic shifts keep it somewhat fresh. Their breakthrough single, "Protect Ya Neck," is also not the greatest song on the album, but it can hold its own, even among such august company.
This is the most important East Coast album of the decade. Bar NONE.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on December 11, 2001
Well, when I bought this album I never heard anything by the Wu-Tang Clan yet so I didn't really had got any expectations but when I heard the album...WOW! It was great, it was like a total new world wich opened itself for me! The Wu Tang Clan really brought something new into hip hop, I can't really explain what but this album has something no other album has.... This is a classic, no doubt but it's not just that, this album is so much more than just a classic, it's ONE of the most important hip hop albums ever made! This is also defenitly the best Wu Tang album but you probably already knew! This album also doesn't have any bad tracks on it but the best are "bring da ruckus" wich has a great beat and thight lyrics, "Da mystery of chessboxin'", "Wu-Tang Clan ain't nuthin ta f' wit", "Method Man" wich is my favourite Wu song and at last but not least "Wu-Tang: 7th chamber - ptII" (I like ptII better then the first, I think the beat is much better! This album introduced us to some of the best rapartists out there like Method man, odb, GZA, Raekwon... and almost all the others! So if you want a classic hip hop album wich means something in the game, I recommend you this album, even my mum likes it, and that ain't no joke!
I'm out..
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on June 21, 2000
Ok,I have a few things to say. FIRST THING, WHAT THE HELL IS THAT GUY TALKING ABOUT. Willenium by Will Smith being the best album? Will Smith SUCKS.ok he can't rap at all. He raps like this, it all makes no sense..."I went to the park, then my dog did a bark, and then I played baseball, at the mall, then I bought a Cd with my friend BB!" It makes no sense, but all of his songs make the top ten. No wait, what top ten, what am I talking about. See Will Smith brainwashes you! Anyway second thing this album is a classic, ok if you like pop, if you like country, if you like rock, and of course if you like rap you will like this album. I like all kinds of music, (well I only like some heavy metal, rock, alternitive, rap) and I love this album. The whole album is good, It could make you laugh at some of the humor, or make you get up in front of the mirror and start rapping to the lyrics. Overall this is a classic album that will apeal to people who like pop, rock, pop rock, heavy metal, rap/metal, alternitive, so on and so on...
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on March 17, 2003
Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers) was released back in the days of REAL hip-hop. You know, back when Snoop Dogg's middle name was "Doggy", Jay-Z only had one nickname, Nas's name was Nasty Nas, and Common's name was Common Sense (this is also when RZA's name was Prince Rakeem; see where I'm going with this?). Really, there isn't much that I can say that hasn't already been said by everyone else except for the fact that the most interesting thing on this album is the intro where the Method Man describes the duties of each Clan member. This lets the listeners know that each member has an individuality and that this isn't just a rap group full of indistinct no-names.
The Clan touches on hard-time topics ("Can It Be All So Simple"), old-time mic-rocking ("Clan in Da Front", where Genius really shines), and they even give the first member who would drop a solo album a chance to shine ("Method Man", which uses an interpolation of Hall & Oates's "Method of Love"; where else do you think the "M-E-T-H-O-D" line came from?). The best songs are "Shame on a N", "C.R.E.A.M.", and...well, everything on here is good. And although their follow-ups and solo projects would be hit-or-miss, it's good to look back to this album and see how it all began.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on June 16, 2002
This is without a doubt the best album found in hip-hop today. This is also the LP that inspired me to be a rapper. Some of the hardest and best metaphors can be found on this one CD. (I developed my style from this LP.) What I like about this CD is that every member of Wu has his well-deserved shine. All of these songs can be considered calssics. Wu-Tang has always been my favorite group. A group that has Method Man, GZA, RZA, Inspectah Deck & Ghostface Killah must be the greatest of all-time. A group that has these 5 lyricists AND produces hit after hit; hot album after hot album is definitly somewhat sacred. The top songs on this cut are C.R.E.A.M., Method Man, Can It All Be So Simple, Protect Ya Neck & Wu-Tang Clan Ain't Nuthin Ta [Mess] Wit. If you don't have this LP, then your life just isnt complete. Below is my track rating (1-5):
Track 1 - 5
Track 2 - 4.5
Track 3 - 5
Track 4 - 4.5
Track 5 - 5
Track 6 - 5
Track 7 - 5
Track 8 - 5+++
Track 9 - 5+++
Track 10 - 5+++
Track 11 - 5
Track 12 - 4.5
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on July 19, 2002
"Shaolin Shadowboxing. In the Wu-Tang Sword Style. If what you say is true, the Shaolin and the Wu-Tang could be dangerous. Do you think your Wu-Tang Sword can defeat me?" After this abstract introduction, straight from a Wu-Tang kung-fu movie that gave these nine MCs their group name, the greatest Wu-Tang album ever and probably one of the top ten rap albums ever begins.
This album is brilliant. No understatement. The beats and lyrics are both of an excellent standard, and you can literally listen to the album without pressing the fast forward button because there isn't a single weak track on the CD to skip. Every song is very, very good, and there are a few classic songs on there as well. The RZA shows his production skills best on this album, where he shows a brilliant ability to change the pace of the tracks. After the slow-paced and hard Bring Da Ruckus, in which most of the Clan are introduced to us, comes the fast-paced and dancey Shame On A Nigga. Shame On... also introduces us to the madly eccentric ODB, who rides the beat brilliantly. His almost psychopathic rantings would later become his trademark. "Do you want to get your teeth knocked the ...out?!" Method Man is also fantastic on this song. Clan In Da Front is a chance for The GZA, the oldest and arguably the best MC in the Clan to showcase his skills. "Clan in da front/Let ya feet stomp!!!"
Wu-Tang 7th Chamber is a good but underrated track, followed by a fairly unique track, Can It All Be So Simple. CREAM (Cash Rules Everything Around Me) is a classic track, with Raekwon at his brilliant best, and Protect Ya Neck is one of the best rap songs of all time. The beat is fantastic and every MC pulls their weight, each dropping very hot verses. Tearz is an emotional song where RZA raps an especcially good verse.
Every single hip-hop fan should have this album in their collection. And if you have every other Clan album but this one, PLEASE BUY THIS, especcially if you think the others are very good because this, the Wu's first album, is their best by far. It shows just how good this album is by the fact that it came out in 1993 and is still excellent. Unfortunately, nobody makes albums like this and Raekwon (from the Wu)'s Only Built 4 Cuban Linx anymore, not even the Wu-Tang Clan. Their latest album, Iron Flag, was good, i gave it four stars, and we can only hope that some time soon the Wu-Tang Clan can recapture the excellence of the days of Enter The Wu-Tang (36 Chambers) in 1993.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on December 13, 2002
This is without a doubt the best album found in hip-hop today. This is also the LP that inspired me to be a rapper. Some of the hardest and best metaphors can be found on this one CD. (I developed my style from this LP.) What I like about this CD is that every member of Wu has his well-deserved shine. All of these songs can be considered calssics. Wu-Tang has always been my favorite group. A group that has Method Man, GZA, RZA, Inspectah Deck & Ghostface Killah must be the greatest of all-time. A group that has these 5 lyricists AND produces hit after hit; hot album after hot album is definitly somewhat sacred. The top songs on this cut are C.R.E.A.M., Method Man, Can It All Be So Simple, Protect Ya Neck & Wu-Tang Clan Ain't Nuthin Ta [Mess] Wit. If you don't have this LP, then your life just isnt complete. Below is my track rating (1-5):
Track 1 - 5
Track 2 - 4.5
Track 3 - 5
Track 4 - 4.5
Track 5 - 5
Track 6 - 5
Track 7 - 5
Track 8 - 5+++
Track 9 - 5+++
Track 10 - 5+++
Track 11 - 5
Track 12 - 4.5
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on October 4, 2001
The Wu-Tang Clan's now classic debut album changed hip hop forever. From RZA's myriad of beats to each member of the group's unique style and flow...
RZA: This cat is the main producer for the clan but he occasionally blesses the mic with his flow. Not one of the stronger members of the clan vocally, he could still rip 90% of the industry on the mic. His solo projects under the name Bobby Digital have been pretty solid.
GZA: It is said that if the Clan "formed like Voltron" then GZA would be the head. He's undoubtedly very intelligent but has a pretty plain voice. Still, he is very gifted lyrically and his solo work is the most introspective of any of the clan's members.
Ol' Dirty Bastard: This album shows off his crazy flow and unique style as none of his solo projects ever have (note that I actually liked "Return to the 36 Chambers, The Dirty Version", his work on this album is just better).
Inspectah Deck: A very underrated member of the clan he consistently comes rough and produces solid verses on many joints on this album. His solo work has been a little disappointing.
Raekwon (the Chef): Now known only as Raekwon. "The Chef" possesses a very unique voice and flow and comes with the best verse on several joints on this album. His solo album "Only Built 4 Cuban Linx" is flat-out incredible.
U-God: In my opinion the least talented member of the Clan. He's still a very solid member of the group and occasionally drops lines that practically force your hand to the rewind switch. Like Inspectah Deck, his solo work has been mostly disappointing.
Ghostface Killah: Although I love his solo projects ("Ironman" and "Supreme Clientele") they can't quite reach the sheer joy listening to his flow on this album evokes in true hip hop heads. He's got a singsongy flow that can come hard and quick at any moment.
Method Man: Probably the most well known member of the clan, his verses on "M.E.T.H.O.D. Man" are some of the highlights of this album. Check out his album "Tical" to see some of his best solo work.
The bottom line is if you like hip hop at all and don't already own this album then it should be the next one you buy. We're talking about three or four emcees that fall in the top fifty of all time, a great producer, and a solid supporting cast here. An absolute must-buy.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on December 16, 2003
This was the album that sparked the legendary careers of the Wu Tang Clan and its members. A type of group that you will only see once because any other 9 member group will be labeled as a Wu rip off and even if someone is able to avoid that title, there is almost no way you could get 9 mc's as good as the members of Wu. This ground breaking record is one of the most raw and creative master pieces ever. With hardcore beats from Rza that are different from any other beats people have put out. The 9 members of the clan have incredible mic skills and some of them are up there lyrically with the best of all time. You will NOT hear any of these mc's rapping about what many modern day rappers do, there lyrics are not about bling and getting krunk, they are thought provoking sentiments from each mc on every track. The rawness is introduced right away on "Enter the Wu-Tang" with the outstanding track "Bring Da Ruckus". Every verse on the track is raw, thought felt, and witty, and Rza chimes in with a yelling chourus of bring da ruckus. The following track take some of the hardcore sense out of it and has more of a funky beat allowing the clan to show versatitlty, "Shame on a N**ga". ODB brings in this track and the untained mc unleashes an excellent verse. "Clan in Da Front" begins to reintroduce the rawness but then it switches up into a hard piano beat where Gza just rips it, maybe lyrcially the best in the group. He stays very intelligent and quick throughout the track, staying calm but still bringing it hard. On "7th Chamber" the clan rips on a hard sortof spooky beat but it is very listenable. Rza brings another type of beat for "Can it be All so Simple" where the group takes you back to their younger days. The beat sounds like a gust of wind blowing in the background with a wind shield wipers sounding bump out front. They bring you back with there witty rhymes of back in the days and you jump into there stories. "Mystery of Chessboxin" brings in some more rawness with a eerie piano key hitting every few seconds. "Wu Tang Clan Ain't Nuthing Ta F' Wit" brings you in like Da ruckus with a yelling out the song title and the same as the opening, you feel it. The clan members that spit on this track each demonstrate their own style over Rza's hard driven beat and chorus. "C.R.E.A.M." the big single on the album has a very easy piano beat from Rza and Raekwon opens up the track and it is also a recolection of the old days, Meth brings in the catchy chourus. "Method Man" is the best track on the album and it is a showcase for the most popular and first solo artist of the group, Meth. He basically spits about getting messed up and he actually sings in the second verse. "Protect Ya Neck" follows the criteria of many of the tracks on the album, and it is a pass the mic track with a pretty good beat. "Tearz" has less of a hard driven beat but it is one of the lesser superb tracks on the album. The album ends with "7th Chamber" over a different beat but at the end of this one, there is clip saying "never teach the Wu tang style" which I feel is a clever way to end the album. This creative masterpiece is not for strictly pop rap fans, the strange beats will throw you off point if you are not prepared for them but for any true rap fan, it is essential for your collection.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse


Need customer service? Click here