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on March 12, 2017
This movie has something unique and that is how the city change itself. You will be wondering many things at the beginning but everything will clear out by the end and final fight. The acting is good but the mood seems like it is an old movie (like really old) Good movie and good quality for blu-ray
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on May 20, 2017
Great movie and blu ray extras
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on September 7, 2017
This is a really good movie!
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on November 1, 2017
I liked this movie
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HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERon February 22, 2007
Cult films don't come much more groundbreaking than "Dark City" -- it was bending reality before the Matrix ever did, and with less obvious messages.

At first glance, Alex Proyas' spellbinding movie seems like a pretty basic story -- a seemingly ordinary man is pitted against the mysterious aliens who control his world. But it is far more than that. It's a dark grimy nightmare where nothing is what it seems, and everything we think is real is just an elaborate illusion, suffused with murky noir atmosphere and a mesmerizingly creepy band of villains. This is one of the rare films that is sublime from start to finish.

The Strangers are pasty-faced, bald, leather-coat-wearing aliens (think Darth Vader, post-mask), whose survival depends on somehow imitating human souls and dreams. So they created the Dark City, to observe and manipulate the unwitting humans.

John Murdoch (Rufus Sewell) wakes up naked in a tub, with no memory of who he is, and a brutally murdered woman in the hotel room outside. Police inspector Frank Bumstead (William Hurt) and the cops are hunting him for a series of murders, but John is sure he didn't murder anyone. He also is the only who seems to notice that the Dark City is perpetually night. And he's the only one who doesn't spontaneously fall into a coma at midnight, which is when the the Strangers appear.

Who are the Strangers? Pasty, bald aliens inhabiting dead bodies who appear every night to rearrange the world. Buildings are reshaped, people's memories change, and some people's whole lives are altered. And before long, John discovers that the strangers are after him because he can "tune" reality as they do.

As John struggles to figure out what is real and what is manufactured by the Strangers, he encounters the eccentric scientist Dr. Shreber (Kiefer Sutherland), who creates the fake memories that the Strangers inject into people's brains. As Shreber tries to help him achieve his destiny, the Strangers send Mr. Hand (Richard O'Brien) -- who has the false memories intended for John -- to find what makes him different from all other humans.

"Dark City" is often considered the predecessor of "The Matrix" -- they both deal with dark-suited people who manipulate the real world, the fluidity of memory and reality, and a single messianic figure who may be the key to stopping them with his reality-warping powers. But "Dark City" is less of a blockbuster, and more of an eerie cult movie that begs to be watched and rewatched, dissected and reexamined.

And Alex Proyas gives this movie a fascinating vibe -- it's dark, angular, and haunted, like if Fritz Lang made a sci-fi noir. The Dark City is a pretty creepy place, like a... well, like a city at night, with some surreal skyscrapers, big cogs and giant clocks. The streets are mostly empty and the citizens seem to walk through life in a half-awake fog, and even everyday actions like eating soup or doing paperwork achieve a strangely unreal quality. When the occasional person like Bumstead -- able to pierce the veil of lies and false memories -- comes along, it seems to cut through the strange eerieness.

But it's also paired with a very suspenseful script, which is equal parts surrealism and gnostic philosophy. All the dialogue is well written ("You know something, I don't think the sun even... exists... in this place"), and very spare, as if the characters have mostly pre-programmed responses to things. But Proyas makes all the dialogue weirdly disconnected, as if the characters are never really communicating fully. It adds to the dreamlike feeling.

Sewell is mesmerizingly good as John Murdoch, moving seamlessly from confusion to skepticism to a pretty wild action scene where he clashes with all the Strangers on a scaffold. He forms a trinity of sorts with Hurt's Bumstead, a capable and intelligent cop who begins to realize that his entire world doesn't make sense, and Sutherland's Peter Lorre-like Shreber as a scientist whose nervous gasps and scarring hint at how the Strangers have treated him. Underused but quite good is Jennifer Connelly, as the conflicted nightclub singer who MIGHT be Murdoch's unfaithful wife... but probably not.

And as the opposition, we have the incomparable Richard O'Brien as one of the Strangers who achieves a small amount of humanity, and seems to like it -- one beautiful little scene has him talking with Emma (whom he now has husbandly memories of) about the nature of memory and how his species has "no experiences to call your own."

Like Kafka on acid, like a dark comic book brought to life, "Dark City" is a fascinatingly dreamlike sci-fi movie, with the mesmerizing design and the complicated plot. What is real? The human soul.
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HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERon January 24, 2008
Cult films don't come much more groundbreaking than "Dark City" -- it was bending reality before the Matrix ever did.

At first glance, Alex Proyas' movie seems like a basic sci-fi little-man-against-evil-aliens flick. But it isn't. Instead, it's a dark grimy nightmare where nothing is what it seems, and everything we think is real is just an elaborate illusion. This is one of the rare films that is creepy from start to finish.

The Strangers are pasty-faced, bald, leather-coat-wearing aliens (think Darth Vader, post-mask), whose survival depends on somehow imitating human souls and dreams. So they created the Dark City, to observe and manipulate the unwitting humans.

Our hero John Murdoch (Rufus Sewell) wakes up naked in a tub, with no memory of who he is, and the police hunting him for brutal murders that he is sure he didn't commit. And worse, hes being pursued by the Strangers, without even knowing who they are or why they're after him.

And then he starts seeing past the Strangers' illusions. Buildings are reshaped, people's memories change, and the sun never appears. As John searches for hints to his past, he finds that the places he knew never existed -- and it's connected to the Strangers. Now John and a suspicious cop will unravel the truth of the City -- and of why the Strangers want John.

It's not surprising that "The Matrix" and "Dark City" are often compared. They deal with an illusionary "real" world, malevolent manipulation, and one man who might be able to stop the bad guys. But "Dark City" is very much unique -- it's dark, angular, and haunted, like if Fritz Lang made a sci-fi noir.

The Dark City is a pretty creepy place, like a... well, like a city at night, with some surreal skyscrapers, big cogs and giant clocks. Proyas gives all these scenes a creepy feeling, which is only increased by the fact that there are so few people in the streets and houses. Even everyday things like eating soup and going to work become unreal.

But it's also paired with a very suspenseful script, which is equal parts surrealism and gnostic philosophy. All the dialogue is well written ("You know something, I don't think the sun even... exists... in this place"), and very spare. But Proyas makes all the dialogue weirdly disconnected, as if the characters are never really communicating fully. It adds to the dreamlike feeling.

Sewell is well-suited to the role of John Murdoch, moving seamlessly from confusion to skepticism to a pretty wild action scene where he clashes with all the Strangers. Connelly has a good if underused role as his nightclub-singer wife. Kiefer Sutherland is a bit annoying, but he does a good Peter Lorre impersonation with all those nervous gasps.

Like Kafka on acid, "Dark City" is a unique and compelling sci-fi movie, with outstanding direction and an amazing plot. Definitely a must-see.
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TOP 500 REVIEWERon July 9, 2006
In a city where the sun never shines and everyone knows the way to Shell Beach but you can never get there, John Murdock (Rufus Sewell) thinks he knows a truth, with his half remember past he now seeks to find out the cities secret.

It appears to be around the 40's and John is thinking of his wife Emma Murdoch (Jennifer Connelly), that now may or may not be someone else.

We are carried along with the story and just might find the secret out before John. Can we handle the truth?

What happens if john finds out how unique he is and whom he may be threatening?

"Dark City" (1998) seems like a short story (both story and screenplay by Alex Proyas "The Crow") with a simple prime that was fleshed out to movie length. The visuals gothic in feel and style will hold you long enough to allow you to enjoy the slow unfolding of the story. Jennifer Connelly seems like she should have been born in the thirty's/ forties as she looks and acts her part so well that you forget you are watching a movie; At times you forget that it is a sci-fi movie.
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on May 22, 2000
Ridley Scott's "Blade Runner" is perhaps the best-known (and certainly the most beloved) attempt to blend science fiction with gritty film noir flourishes. The future portrayed in this film looked decidedly desperate and retro, and thus somehow more realistic.
"Dark City" takes this concept to the next level, in that for much of the movie you're not even aware that it's science fiction.
The movie begins with a man waking up bloody in a bathtub with no idea as to who he is or how he got there, a plot no doubt familiar to noir fans. He comes to realize he is being hunted by the police for a murder he has no recollection of.
And then things get weird.
Courtesy prohibits discussion of the plot, the unfolding of which is crucial to viewers' enjoyment of the film, but suffice it to say that nothing is what it seems in Dark City, keeping with the best tradition of film noir.
The visuals in the film are terrific. The setting is appropriately dark and menacing, and the lighting is evocative of all those wonderful 40s and 50s movies which so obviously served as the film's inspiration. The acting is terrific, with Kiefer Sutherland taking an appropriately slimy turn as a mad scientist who may hold the key to the nefarious dealings in the city. Jennifer Connelly is at her gorgeous best here as the endangered femme fatale. Rufus Sewell sparkles as the amnesiac protagonist who may or may not be a serial killer, but who holds the fate of Dark City in his hands.
If you loved "Blade Runner", "Total Recall", "12 Monkeys," "D.O.A.", the works of Raymond Chandler and Dashell Hammett, or latter-day noir films such as "Body Double" or "Chinatown", I guarantee you'll love "Dark City", a truly unique film.
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on April 18, 2002
Well it is a lot like the Matrix (however Dark City was first). It starts off with a professor (Kiefer Sutherland) explaining the arrival of "the strangers" a race of aliens, and how he betrayed the human race. A man (Rufus Sewell) awakens confused he is in a hotel room with a murdered prostitute, blood on his forehead, and naked in the bathtub. He then is called by the Professor who warns him to leave. He does as several ominous looking "strangers" head up to his room. He then heads about the streets in a city that is always night. He can't remember who he is, or what he is supposed to be doing. He is being tracked by a detective (William Hurt) who is somewhat doubting his guilt as a prostitute murderer. Rufus Sewell's characters searching leads him back to his wife (Jennifer Connelly) and eventually the detective catches up to him. They then began searching for the answer to what this city (and world) really is. It is an absolutely dazzeling, captivating, fascinating sci fi tale. Its special affects are superb, and the acting is unbelievable. The directing is masterfully handled by Alex Proyas (The Crow). This is one of the most original and breathtaking films to come out recently. I HIGHLY recommend it. It is rated R for violence not very gory, a few choice words, and some naked hookers (mostly dead ones.), but those minor cautions aside if you are adult about this film you will love it, or at least appreciate its vision, scope, and magnitude.
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on June 22, 2017
definitely a good product Great product. Easy to work with, sent quickly, lovely to look at. Couldn't be happier. Plan to order more!!! I strongly and highly recommend them. pleasant service,I love my bands worked as promised These are adorable! Love them! Works extremely well
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