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28 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The End of Therapy, June 14 2003
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This review is from: Loving What Is: Four Questions That Can Change Your Life (Hardcover)
I had a story. It wasn't a happy story. It was about an abusive childhoood. I wore that story like a pair of sunglasses. I saw my world through that story. I kept spoiling my present with those past experiences.
"The Work" a process contained in this book is the only system that allowed me to really get to the truth of my story - ah - the story under such examination just started dropping away.
This book is not in competition with any other. No other book can take its place. The niche is unique. In A Course in Miracles you are told forgiveness is the key but no one gives you a road map for how to do that - Byron Katies does. In The Power of Now Eckhardt Tolle tells us to be fully in the present moment and just be aware of the pain body - Byron Katie tells you to investigate that pain body so that it can drop away.
For me, this was the single best book that I've experienced that genuinely helped me...I went to A Course in Miracles classes for over 7 years - no real change - I read and am doing The Work in Loving What Is - major changes in two weeks....
I'm very thankful for this book, this work.

I'd like to say that now I wear sunglasses so that people won't be blinded by the light coming from my eyes...but that's stretching it a bit - I'm just a lot happier!
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Initial post: Feb 25, 2017, 8:41:58 AM PST
Leila C. says:
Hello Jan. Would you address specifically how this book helped you? I am perplex because I know The Work and my experience with it is that it's not so truly working. Since you expressed that you had an abusive childhood, you may consider that this childhood is more than a story. However you express that through The Work your story just started dropping away. While I wait for your possible answer to my comment, let me tell you what my hypothesis is about people for whom The Work greatly works : some experiences are so painful that some people really want to see them otherwise and so they are very interested into any mental theories that would help them see their life differently. Hence they could more easily be convinced by such theories or fallacies as The Work than other people. I don't know. You tell me. But I'm very interested by a more concrete explanation of how The Work works than this, with all due respect. Because either way we have experienced a terrible thing or we haven't. And if we have, I don't see how it drops away. Can you help us see that? Thanks.
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